Are DVD players now disposable?

Discussion in 'Playback Devices' started by RobR, Jul 17, 2004.

  1. RobR

    RobR Second Unit

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2000
    Messages:
    275
    Likes Received:
    0
    My Sony DVP-S560D DVD player that I've had for 4 years or so recently stopped working. I was going to take it in for repair until I discovered that DVD players have now gotten so cheap that I wonder if it makes sense even to repair the old one. For example, Sony DVD-NS575P/S prog scan is only $80. Are DVD players now disposable like toasters and can openers? Once they die, you just replace them?
     
  2. RobR

    RobR Second Unit

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2000
    Messages:
    275
    Likes Received:
    0
    Sorry, could you move this thread to Audio/Video Sources?
     
  3. Chris Gerhard

    Chris Gerhard Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2002
    Messages:
    1,281
    Likes Received:
    4
    Real Name:
    Chris Gerhard
    Yes, for all but the most expensive DVD players, they are now throw away rather than fix. You should be able to find a better player for less than it would cost to fix your Sony.

    Chris
     
  4. Shane Martin

    Shane Martin Producer

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 1999
    Messages:
    6,017
    Likes Received:
    0
    If you are going to continue to spend less then $300 for a dvd player then yes they are disposable. For some reason past that point I've noticed a large jump in quality. That is if you can find a decent player that works and has quirks you can deal with for less then $300.
     
  5. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 1999
    Messages:
    16,738
    Likes Received:
    129
    I sort of guess I agree.

    Shane puts the yes-they-are-disposable price point at $300. I might do him one better and suggest that "quality" as we prefer it in a player starts at around $150 or so.

    DVD players, except for the rugged, top-of-the-line units from the established OEMs, have never been noted for their ruggedness and durability. The build quality on most players — again, except at the very top — is laughably flimsy, most of them weighing less than the shipping cartons in which they arrive.

    But if you take care of these machines, operating them conservatively (no all-day-long movie marathons) and keeping them clean and free of dust, they should last reasonably long.

    It's those $30 wonders from Wal-Mart that truly are disposable, though. Once one of them wears out (in about three months of use), just get a new one. Better still, get a good player from one of the "acceptable" manufacturers.
     
  6. Terry H

    Terry H Second Unit

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2001
    Messages:
    316
    Likes Received:
    0

    They always were. If you (the user) can't update the firmware, it is disposable, regardless of price.
     
  7. Rachael B

    Rachael B Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2000
    Messages:
    4,697
    Likes Received:
    27
    Location:
    Knocksville, TN
    Real Name:
    Rachael Bellomy
    Wouldn't the ultimate disposable DVD player be sans a power button? You'd just plug it in or pull the tab to activate it's battery and use it till it expires a few hours, day/s, week/s later. A $9.99 DVD player??? Doesn't seem all that unlikey and certainly not impossible anymore... A good template might be disposable cameras? As daft as I feel about writing this, in 1-5 years it really could be true?[​IMG]
     
  8. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 1999
    Messages:
    11,571
    Likes Received:
    24
    Location:
    NorCal
    Real Name:
    John
    I've had my 560d (my daughter is using it now) for years, but at this time, less expensive players can actually give you better results. At the time this player was a middle of the road, but by today's standards it is in the $100 player category, despite being a good player. It REALLY would not be in your best interest to repair this player, it is a piece of nostalgia or landfill now. Today, in the $100-300 range, yes, by the time your player breaks down, you are better off getting a new one rather than buying an extended warranty...
     
  9. StephenHa

    StephenHa Second Unit

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2003
    Messages:
    364
    Likes Received:
    0
    most companies don't even sell parts to their dvd players they have to be sent to the manufacturer, we couldn't even get a schematic for a $300 player and we were authorized for warranty repair
     

Share This Page