are computer techies just ignorant of a/v?

Discussion in 'AV Receivers' started by JediFonger, Feb 28, 2006.

  1. JediFonger

    JediFonger Producer

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  2. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    I agree with the article. I had 7.1 once in my house and the rear soundfield was distracting. 5.1 works better for me. When people ask my advice I always recommend 5.1 and don't worry about anything more.
     
  3. JediFonger

    JediFonger Producer

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    what about HD-DVD/BR's new "7.1" replacement of 5.1?
     
  4. Bobby T

    Bobby T Supporting Actor

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    the article completly ignores the 2 new formats on the horizon which will both be 7.1
     
  5. SethH

    SethH Cinematographer

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    You're making the assumption that the average consumer is going to buy into either of these new formats. I sincerely hope that they do, but I have serious doubts that it will happen anytime soon.

    I tend to agree with much of the article for general consumers. People have enough trouble setting up and dealing with 5.1 -- much less 7.1

    There was a thread awhile back that just asked people to list the amusing things they'd seen friends do with surround systems. One of the more common is setting the two surround speakers on top of the front main speakers. My point is that for many consumers 7.1 is just going to mean a taller stack of speakers in the front of the room.

    I hope 7.1 catches on, but I do agree that you've got to have a room for it. If you've got a small room and your seating area is against the back wall 7.1 can be difficult to implement.
     
  6. FeisalK

    FeisalK Screenwriter

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    i think what is important is lettng people know that 7.1 receivers work fine when set up 5.1 - and they don't HAVE to buy the two additional speakers if they {don't want|can't accommodate} it

    i can imagine though, someone going to a store and being stampeded by the salesman into buying 7.1 - all receivers nowadays are anyways.

    but regular joe won't know to say "No. I only want 5.1, regardless of the receiver" With a set budget this probably leads to compromising on the overall quality of the individual speakers, compromising placement and setup.
     
  7. JediFonger

    JediFonger Producer

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    hrm... i expected diff. responses...
     
  8. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    How so? From HTF's membership?
     
  9. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

    Moderator

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    Where did the “ignorant computer techie” come from? In case you couldn’t tell from his knowledge writing, Mr. Fleischmann is an audio guy. He works for Home Theater Magazine.

    I also agree with his assessment – the extra channels are only useful in larger-than-average rooms. Note that one respondent commented that he had heard 7.1 in a small room and it didn’t sound any different than 5.1

    Personally five speakers in my living room is the maximum I’m willing to go with.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  10. Jongyoon Lee

    Jongyoon Lee Stunt Coordinator

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    Exactly what I was wondering too. I think the intention of the original poster was to disagree with M. Fleischmann, but ended up insulting us, the computer techies. [​IMG]
     
  11. Dick Knisely

    Dick Knisely Second Unit

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    to the original question:

    NO

    In fact, my experience is just the opposite. Tech folks are much more likely to also be into audio and video gear.
     
  12. LanceJ

    LanceJ Producer

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    I don't have a 6.1 or 7.1 set up and have only heard these in retail environments including a hi-end one with all B&W Diamond Series speakers and Classe electronics, but I was never really impressed. So lack of in-depth personal experience kept me from saying anything but I still had my doubts about their usefulness for most people.

    So I am a little relieved that a professional reviewer has doubts too, along with quite a few members here (and on that site too, following the article). I remember when I sold HT in the mid 90s in the Dolby Pro-Logic days: it was difficult enough trying to sell a 5.1 system. But these days, when audio in general is suffering such a major downturn in popularity??? I would totally hate to try to sell those expanded formats.

    For example, Best Buy sells several HTiBs consisting of a separate receiver, dvd player and 7.1 speaker systems. These all sit on the display shelfs and when you walk up to one of them, the first thing you see is - literally - a *pile* of speakers. This has to be intimidating to the casual HT customer.....and almost scary to the do-it-yourselfer who has to run all that wire everywhere (and 95% of these HTiBs feature silver finished speakers - how many people want a bunch of silver boxes clinging to all the walls in their living room??). So just like the writer of the article said, I also believe the industry is shooting itself in the foot by pushing the 6.1/7.1 formats so hard.

    And personally speaking the rear soundfield, or surround in general I guess, is just an *enhancement* for the movie's story & that's all. Going through so much extra trouble and extra $$$ just so I can hear crickets chirping a bit more realistically just isn't for me.
     
  13. SethH

    SethH Cinematographer

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    I think you probably underestimated the number of computer geeks on this site. [​IMG]
     
  14. Ryan Peddle

    Ryan Peddle Second Unit

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    Same here. I love 5.1, and in any room that I have ever been in it has been the perfect setup for home theater. Even the high end audio store where I shop (Whitby Audio) has all listening rooms set up in a 5.1 configuration.

    The main and yet simplest reason why I am not interested in more that 5.1 and that I would have more wires to deal with and figuring out how to get them across my living room.

    Until, at least, I have a barebones room to start with where I can preplan where wires go (ei behind the walls) it's 5.1 for me.
     
  15. Srinivas Reddy

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    I added a rear center and it has added more depth to the surround. This is a very recent addition [​IMG] and have not yet got time to listen to 6.1 encoded DVDs yet. LOTR and T2 (Special Edition) have this I think.

    My HT room is fairly large (18x22) and so that might have helped.

    I am a techie too but was into audio and electronics way before that. Never learned the theory behind audio - it was always experiemntal. Thats why I am more of a reader than a poster here. In high school, with no money, we inverted a speaker into a 3 foot deep jar and susupended it where it would give the maximum bass. Trust me, it worked pretty well. [​IMG]

    Srinivas
     
  16. JediFonger

    JediFonger Producer

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  17. Reginald Trent

    Reginald Trent Screenwriter

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    "Personally five speakers in my living room is the maximum I’m willing to go with.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt"

    I agree with Wayne. 5.1 is the maximum I'm willing to have at this point.
     
  18. LanceJ

    LanceJ Producer

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    Y'all need to read that very long article in Widescreen Review Magazine this month that contains (most) of the transcript of the discussion between a writer for the magazine and a panel of several heavyweights in the recording industry. They also agreed the 5.1 format was enough. Ironically, the discussion was sponsored by DTS - I wonder how they felt about all this?!

    Or, you can purchase the entire transcript here (scroll down):

    "Home Theater Cruise: A New Surround Sound Standard Recap"
     
  19. JediFonger

    JediFonger Producer

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  20. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Sir, I am not at all following what you're trying to say. Can you please state it more clearly in a post?
     

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