Arcade Coin-Op Advice

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Brett Hancock, Jun 11, 2003.

  1. Brett Hancock

    Brett Hancock Supporting Actor

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    I did a search on this and found a few helpful links but wanted some more so I decided to make a new thread. I am convinced that I am going to buy a stand up arcade machine for my house. I am going to be a street fighter 2 one because of 6 buttons, relatively low price, and its JAMMA, then I can upgrade to the current capcom system(I forget what its called with the A boards and the B boards though) I just wanted to know if anyone had some good links relating to Repairs and Maintanince, where to buy, or anything else that might be helpful. Also of course if anyone has one for sale on the west coast or knows of a place that sells cabs let me know.
     
  2. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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    Our local dealer is outstanding on service, repairs and quality units. At the very least they could probably recommend you a reputable dealer in your area

    http://www.tntamusements.com
     
  3. Scott L

    Scott L Producer

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    www.happcontrols.com for individual parts.
    www.arcadecontrols.com click cabinets on the left for some good info.
    www.ebay.com for used cabinets, hopefully in your area.
    www.shoryuken.com many of the members have a lot of experience with JAMMA's and even making their own cabinets (plus a lot of California players there).

    A lot of people will tell you to go for a MAME cabinet but it's all up to you. It will take a lot of work & money to set one of those bad boys up.
     
  4. Mike Pollmann

    Mike Pollmann Stunt Coordinator

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    I built a MAME cabinet (converted from an old TMNT) and love it. It was quite a bit of work, and not cheap since I bought most of the parts new. But I'm very glad I did it. Let me know if you guys want pictures/more info/etc.

    - Mike
     
  5. Brett Hancock

    Brett Hancock Supporting Actor

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    I would definitely like more info.
     
  6. Scooter

    Scooter Screenwriter

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  7. Mike Pollmann

    Mike Pollmann Stunt Coordinator

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    Here's some pics of my MAME cabinet:

    http://home.wi.rr.com/dg64738/mame1.jpg
    http://home.wi.rr.com/dg64738/mame2.jpg
    http://home.wi.rr.com/dg64738/mame3.jpg
    http://home.wi.rr.com/dg64738/mame4.jpg
    http://home.wi.rr.com/dg64738/mame5.jpg
    http://home.wi.rr.com/dg64738/mame6.jpg

    Materials cost for this project was about $2000, not including the computer:

    Original TMNT Arcade game (auction) - $450
    27" Wells-Gardner VGA Arcade monitor - $500
    Controls/buttons/mounting plates - ~$500 (priceiest items are trackball for $95, spinner for $65)
    IPAC interface - $70
    Artwork - $180

    The rest of the cost was lumber, paint, t-molding, and other supplies.

    Building was a lot of woodworking. The control panel I have was built from scratch but mounted on the original "control panel box". I also had to make a new rear door for the machine to accommodate the monitor frame sticking out about 1". (Plus the door that I got with it was in terrible shape). Most of the wiring goes through an "IPAC" keyboard interface. This basically translates button/switch presses into keyboard strokes that are assignable. This way the computer sees every button as a separate letter. The spinner and trackball I hooked up by hacking up old mice. They plug into a USB port and PS/2 port. Power (12V and 5V) I got from a hard-drive connector in the computer. 12V is used for the light-up trackball and coin door lights. 5V is required for the trackball to work. That's the crash course on the details. [​IMG]

    The most work was in the control panel. This took a ton of planning, careful measuring for clearance underneath, and decision making. It also was a lot of time to actually build it. The joysticks are mounted on mounting plates that support "restrictors" that limit movement for 4-way/2-way games. The restrictors pop on or off the top of the panel. I learned a lot about woodworking while building this.

    Artwork I got done at a professional sign printing shop. It is reverse-printed on polycarbonate.

    FYI: The dual sticks on both sides allow 2 player Smash TV, and also allow each player to play right or left handed.

    Let me know if you guys have more questions!

    Here's some links:

    http://www.oscarcontrols.com - They make great spinners and joystick mounting plates/restrictors
    http://www.ultimarc.com - They sell the IPAC
    http://www.happcontrols.com - Sells arcade joysticks/buttons/etc.
     
  8. Trenton McNeil

    Trenton McNeil Second Unit

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    That is incredible!

    Do you do commissioned work? [​IMG]
     
  9. Mike Pollmann

    Mike Pollmann Stunt Coordinator

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    With as many hours as this took? Heck no! [​IMG]

    (I estimate this took about 40-50 hours to complete.)
     
  10. Michael Warner

    Michael Warner Supporting Actor

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    I also finished up my first MAME cabinet a few months ago. Not nearly as polished as Mike's but not bad for a klutz like me. I already had an old computer and TV so cost of controls and materials was only about $400 (I wasted a lot of wood on bad cuts). The cab gets daily usage and pounding from the kids, and me of course, and so far it's holding up under the abuse. There's just something about having thousands of classic arcade games at your fingertips.

    The reason the player one & two controls are laid out with the buttons on different sides is that with some games I prefer to use my left hand for the buttons and for some the right. That's the nice thing about doing your own cabinet, you can set it up exactly how you want it.

    And yes, Capt. Picard is wearing a matador hat. (don't ask)

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Greg_R

    Greg_R Screenwriter

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  12. Brett Hancock

    Brett Hancock Supporting Actor

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    Holy friggin crap!!!

    Those are sweeeet!! Are those MAME games arcade perfect?
     
  13. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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    MAME is Multi Arcade Machine Emulator, it uses copies of the ROM boards from the arcade machines, so it quite literally is the arcade machine

    That being said, any discussion of obtaining said ROMs ain't happening here
     
  14. Brett Hancock

    Brett Hancock Supporting Actor

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    I wasn't interesting in obtaining them but I was just wondering how good of translations they were.
     
  15. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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    Brett, you're not understanding

    These are the original arcade games, running in emulation

    They are arcade perfect.
     
  16. Tony_P

    Tony_P Stunt Coordinator

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    Brett,

    The emulator program (MAME) serves to translate the data from the original rom code and display the graphics and sound. It works very, very well. The games themselves are not adapted in any way, so they look, sound, and feel (gameplay) exactly as you remember them.

    For those of us who grew up in the 80s, this is extremely cool... [​IMG]
     

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