Appliance Epoxy paint woes........... :(

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Chris Carswell, Sep 16, 2002.

  1. Chris Carswell

    Chris Carswell Supporting Actor

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    I usually use just appliance epoxy for my projects b/c it dries the hardest, but at $4.5 a can it gets expensive. This time I decided to use a primer (Kilz odorless interior oil-base) then some cheap black spray paint (walmart $.88 special) for a base coat over the Kilz, then go with a final coat of appliance epoxy. All was fine until the final coat of epoxy. When I sprayed it on it looked like it had a reaction of some type and bubbled up. It only did that in a few spots. I don't think it reacted with the paint b/c there was an even coat all over. I think where the paint was real thin from sanding the most it got down to the Kilz and reacted with it. Any ideas?
    I plan on just sanding it down and painting over it with epoxy again (I doubt it will get down to the Kilz & bubble up) for a final coat. -OR- Forget the epoxy for this one and just finish up with some Krylon?
    Thanks
     
  2. John E Janowitz

    John E Janowitz Second Unit

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    Chris, I'm not sure what kind of epoxy paint you are using. You need to check the solvents that it has in it. Some will react with Kilz. After using Kilz for awhile, I realized it is not the best option if you're painting over with anything but latex. One thing that works better is a Bin primer. It seems very similar to Kliz at first glance, but is actually schellac. Kilz was a cheaper, easier to make primer that they came up with as a substitute for schellac. It works just as well at covering stains, etc, but is more subject to reacting with different top coats.

    One thing I like to use is a Laquer sanding sealer. Laquer thinner is about as universal a solvent as you can get. It eats up just about everything. As a result, when laquer is dried, most other paints won't eat into it.

    Another option is to seal with a clear polyurethane. Polyurethane seems to be very chemically dead once dried. I've found that I can put lots of top coats over it without much of a problem. It's also very good at sealing the porous surfaces on MDF.

    Just try a few things out on scrap before you end up doing the whole enclosure. Someone I have working for me ended up spraying 12 speaker cabinets, and all of them needed to have the paint sanded off. Then they needed to be resealed and repainted. He won't make that mistake again.

    John
     
  3. Mike Strassburg

    Mike Strassburg Second Unit

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    Sounds like you sprayed enamel over a lacquer basecoat. Not a good idea as the lacquer needs to breath as part of the drying process. The enamel seals it tight and then you get....bubbles and other nasty things. At least that's been my experience.
     
  4. Chris Carswell

    Chris Carswell Supporting Actor

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    Thanks guys for the info. I'll try to post a pic soon of what it actually looks like.
    John,
    I have an automotive spray gun at my shop in Orlando that I use to spray on Polyurethane [​IMG] Problem is the sub is in Gainesville & I don't feel like lugging that beast down there to paint then back up again.
    Where can I get some of that "Bin Primer"?
    Also I sent you an email about the terminal size of the speakers I ordered (SA071 & SATW1). I going with .250" for the woofers & .187" for the tweeters. Sound good?
     
  5. Kyle Richardson

    Kyle Richardson Screenwriter

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    Just ask Pat S. what happens when you mix to incompatible paints, he can even show you pictures [​IMG]
     
  6. Chris Carswell

    Chris Carswell Supporting Actor

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    Live & Learn ( and have extra sand paper [​IMG] )
    I won't be making this mistake again.
     
  7. Ken Cline

    Ken Cline Stunt Coordinator

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    I believe the 88 cent paint is the culprit. I've used Kilz oil based with epoxy over it with no problems.
     
  8. Chris Carswell

    Chris Carswell Supporting Actor

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    You think so? I will do some test pieces tomorrow & see what happens. How much dry time did you give it?
    Thanks again.
    C-man
     
  9. Ken Cline

    Ken Cline Stunt Coordinator

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    Chris,

    I believe I let the Kilz dry overnight before applying the epoxy. What epoxy are you using? I'm using the stuff from Home Depot.
     
  10. Chris Carswell

    Chris Carswell Supporting Actor

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    I let the kilz dry for 2 hours. It was completely dry. Then I lightly sanded it then sprayed it with 1 can of the cheap Walmart spray paint. Looked fine, no bubbles or problems at all. Let that dry for 2 days then sanded and sprayed on ACE Appliance Epoxy. Bubbled up in some spots. Like I said I think where the paint was thin from sanding in those spots it might of reacted with the Kilz not the Walmart spray paint which was all over. I just sanded it down again so I'm ready for my final coat. Should I try and go with the epoxy again or Walmart special since I've never had any problems with that stuff?
     
  11. Ken Cline

    Ken Cline Stunt Coordinator

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    Well Chris,

    I think the epoxy paint is much more durable than the cheap 88 cent paint. I know the epoxy paint is more expensive, but probably worth it.

    I also have been playing araound with the hammer finishes (also from HD). Real tough stuff, and it looks real nice too. Hides a lot of small blemishes/imperfections in the wood. But again, it's more expensive.

    Another finish would be the bed liner stuff available from Kragen (and some other auto places). This is another real durable finish. It's about about a $1 or so more than the epoxy paint.

    I would say if you're happy with the Walmart paint, then go with it. I'm always for the most inexpensive way to do things.

    Good luck!
     
  12. Chris Carswell

    Chris Carswell Supporting Actor

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    I'm not too worried anymore. I'm just going to use the cheap stuff for now. Later on when I feel more motivated & have the time I'll take it to the shop and shoot it with a couple coats of Polyurethane using my automotive spray gun. Piano like finishes are easy with that thing. I just want to get this bad boy up & running so I can get on with my other speakers ( building a complete 5.1 setup from scratch [​IMG] ).
     

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