Apparantly Titanic's the worst film ever...

Tino

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And yet even though we have documentary evidence that Margaret Brown threatened to throw Hitchens overboard after he shot off his mouth and she then took charge of organizing the women rowing Boat #6, that *wasn't* included. Curious indeed.
I actually agree that that scene should have been included. But I just chalk it up to a directorial decision. I’m sure Cameron had his reasons.
 

Tino

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I'm a big fan of the 1997 movie too, but I honestly don't understand why you take it SO personally when someone disagrees with you?
Easy answer. I don’t.

The opinion is irrelevant to me and I never challenge it. Disagreements are healthy and lead to great discussions. However attacking the film for being inaccurate when it isn’t forces me to defend it.
 

Tino

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I recommend this. I will note that this Titanic historian is equal opportunity for *all* productions, even the ones he favors.

Minor nit picks, goofs and flubs imo. Doesn’t change the fact the Cameron’s Titanic is still the most historically accurate Titanic film ever made. A statement echoed by many Titanic historians including Don Lynch and Ken Marschall (who provided the commentaries for both A Night To Remember and Cameron’s Titanic).
 

Jack P

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He freely admits some are trivial. Collectively they along with the film's biggest flaw adds up to a lot more from my standpoint (They at least show it's not out of bounds for someone to characterize the film as "inaccurate" in many respects). I won't reprint his concluding section which addresses this subject in more detail as to why these inaccuracies as a whole do matter especially if we're supposed to congratulate Cameron for being an exceptional genius on all things regarding the "look" and the background accuracy. But this sentiment at the beginning sums up the bigger picture best for me.

"For many, this author included, the biggest "mistake" was the decision to focus on fictional characters rather than any of the other 2200 people on board, many of whom had lives just as interesting as Jack'n'Rose."
 
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Tino

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For many, this author included, the biggest "mistake" was the decision to focus on fictional characters rather than any of the other 2200 people on board, many of whom had lives just as interesting as Jack'n'Rose."
This I disagree with strongly. The author imo obviously has an agenda against Cameron and the film as evidenced by his tone. That aspect of the film is obviously what made it so successful resulting in a fresh take on telling the Titanic story. In my ( and millions of teenage girls obviously;))humble opinion.
 

Tino

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By the way @Jack P , apologies if my comments sounded harsh or insulting in any way. Not my intent. Obviously we are both huge Titanic buffs and we can agree to disagree. Cheers. :)
 
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James Luckard

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This I disagree with strongly. The author imo obviously has an agenda against Cameron and the film as evidenced by his tone. That aspect of the film is obviously what made it so successful resulting in a fresh take on telling the Titanic story. In my ( and millions of teenage girls obviously;))humble opinion.
I agree completely. Titanic was the highest grossing film of all time in 1997, and remains the third highest grossing film ever, precisely BECAUSE of its fictional love story, woven through the true story.

The fictional love story is intentionally an elemental story, like a folk tale. Cameron pitched it as "Romeo & Juliet on the Titanic." It's a melodrama, with a sweeping fictional romantic narrative that gets an audience to invest in the film, and then layers in a great deal of historically accurate additional beats along the way.

Within the context of a $200 million studio film, with the desire to entertain, it's 100x as accurate as any other filmmaker would have ever made it. A scrupulously factual narrative would have been a docudrama like A Night to Remember, and would never have found a wide audience. Cameron had no interest in remaking that film, he specifically said at the time that his desire was to make his own Dr. Zhivago, another fictional love story set within a major global event.

I think Titanic is a masterpiece. Does it have some scenes with on-the-nose dialogue? Sure, but it was written for a mass audience, and every one of the seventeen times I've seen it in theaters during its original release and various re-releases, those scenes are usually the ones that get the biggest reactions from the audience.

Cameron is a very smart man. Just two years before Titanic he wrote, edited and produced Strange Days. It's nuanced, subtle, bracingly original... and grossed $7 million, losing tens of millions for Fox. Titanic has grossed $2 billion. The elemental simplicity of its storytelling is precisely how it did that.
 

Jack P

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This I disagree with strongly. The author imo obviously has an agenda against Cameron and the film as evidenced by his tone.
Paul Lee is a very distinguished Titanic scholar. He has no "agenda" against Cameron. He knows more about the disaster than any one of us could ever hope to and I have the highest respect for his knowledge and his commitment to scholarly research about the sinking.
 
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Tino

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Paul Lee is a very distinguished Titanic scholar. He has no "agenda" against Cameron. He knows more about the disaster than any one of us could ever hope to and I have the highest respect for his knowledge and his commitment to scholarly research about the sinking.
His comments and tone in that article suggest otherwise. Let’s just agree to disagree on your opinion.
 
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Jack P

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Saying someone has an "agenda" carries with it an implication of dishonesty on the part of the author. That is what I object to. The totality of his website which contains dozens of articles on the Titanic about various things (of which analyzing the Cameron film is just one small part) shows that his passion is devoted to one thing only, and that's providing helpful scholarly reference to those who care about the real story of the ship and those who were on board.
 
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Tino

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Ok. Perhaps agenda is the wrong word. Bias is better. He obviously knows his Titanic stuff but his clear dislike of Cameron’s film is apparent. He even admits he is nit picky and comments like “ Long after the sentimental fawning over the film had thankfully faded,” and calling the rereleases “cash grabs”. Also Calling other Titanic historians cronies and sycophants for working with Cameron on the film is also bad form. Like this comment:
“I now suspect that the following is true; throw a lot of money at a project, gloss over the inaccuracies in your work, surround yourself with historian pals (or sycophants who like to casually namedrop their association with "Jim", "Don", "Ken" etc. into messages like Parks Stephenson just to remind you of their superiority), and arrange multiple dives to the wreck, and you'll be considered an "expert" yourself.” There are plenty more dismissive comments like these in that article that to me show that “bias”.
 

Jack P

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Done. And for the record pages back I suggested bringing this discussion to a Titanic ‘97 thread instead of here but that suggestion was discarded.
Because I had no desire to get into a lengthy discourse about a film I hate (and that is putting it mildly) because I already went through that 20 years ago. And for the record the only reason a "discussion" got triggered was because one throwaway line of mine in a post that was devoted to "SOS Titanic" was seized on to go off-topic.

And I'm not saying anything more in this thread because I couldn't be paid to sit through Cameron's film again.
 
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benbess

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Cameron's Titanic is one of my favorite movies of the last 30 years. For some reason over the past few days I've been watching videos from the wreck of the real Titanic, as well as video recreations of the sinking. I guess I overdid it, because last night I dreamed I was on the Titanic as it sank, and it was very spooky. I'm still amazed that the electrical system held out until shortly before the ship sank. Something that Cameron captures is that very eerie feeling that must have existed in real life as beautifully set tables in the first class dining hall were sinking into water under a blaze of electric lights. It's an amazing movie about dreams, technological hubris, love, life, death. I don't think I've watched the whole movie since it came out in 3D in 2012. After 8 years I think I'm ready to go back....I have my blu-ray, and it will be my first time watching it on our 60" 4k tv.
 
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