Anyone not using Sony's 16:9 mode?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Andy Kim, Aug 5, 2002.

  1. Andy Kim

    Andy Kim Second Unit

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    Hi,
    When I first got the television and tried the 16:9 mode, I was blown away and told myself I would never go back to 4:3 mode. With 4:3 you can see the scan lines and such.

    But recently, I've noticed with some discs that 16:9 mode will cause more artifacts (?) to appear in certain scenes, most notably scenes with water and scenes with smoke.
    For example in "Fly Away Home" near the end when Anna is flying by herself and the shot is from above looking down, in certain scenes when the glider is passing water, artifacts will appear in lake below as if it was badly compressed. In 4:3 mode, its not as apparant.
    It seems like 16:9 does increase the picture quality but also increases the visability of poor compression.

    Has anyone else noticed that? I'm using component connections and the 36FS13 Sony.
    Andy

    UPDATED:
    After going thru some examples of compression artifacts on the web, I think the point I'm trying is that I've noticed 16:9 mode makes these artifacts more noticible.
     
  2. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Can you describe these artifacts, Andy? It might be the player or the disc involved; I've noticed no artifacting on my WEGA that can be attributed to the 16:9 vertical compression mode.
     
  3. Andy Kim

    Andy Kim Second Unit

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    For example in the Fly Away Home scene, the camera is moving across the lake. The lake is very dark, and you can see these dynamic blotches or patches of dark. They stay pretty much the same size but their edges are kinda pixelized and moving about as the camera moves.
    I guess they look kinda like the poor compression you see in dark scenes or on VCDs.
    16:9 mode seems to make them more prominent to the eye. In the particular scene I mentioned, 16:9 actually makes it quite visible compared to watching in 4:3.
     
  4. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    I'm certain this artifacting is endemic to the disc itself, Andy--it's an authoring issue.

    The reason you can see it more clearly in in the 16:9 mode is probably because that when the scanning lines are squeezed closer together certain refined details are more apparent. When you look at the disc in 4:3 letterboxed mode you are losing more than a third of the picture resolution--meaning the artifacting is probably still there, but you just can't see it.
     
  5. Lew Crippen

    Lew Crippen Executive Producer

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    What Jack said. This is the video equivalent of the early days of hi-fi (and something that still happens with new audio enthusiasts). It took new amplifiers and speakers for us to be able to hear how bad many of our LPs sounded.
     
  6. Andy Kim

    Andy Kim Second Unit

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    Great!
    Thanks for the clear up guys. Your explaination of the artifacts being more noticable in 16:9 makes sense. I guess that Fly Away Home scene in particular caught me off guard. The transfer is pretty amazing otherwise.
    I'll be switching back to 16:9 now.
    Thanks!
     
  7. JayF

    JayF Stunt Coordinator

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    The other thing about Fly Away Home is that it was one of the initial DVDs released in the spring of 1997. DVD authoring has come a long way since then.
     
  8. RyanDinan

    RyanDinan Stunt Coordinator

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    Andy,

    Along with what the others have said, you may want to double-check and be sure that your brightness is set to its optimum point -

    These "blotches" are MPEG artifacts, and tend to be caused by dark areas, and areas of solid color.

    The artifacting in the dark areas should be much less noticeable if your brightness is set correctly.

    If you havent allready - Get a copy of Avia or Video Essentials, and calibrate the set.

    -Ryan Dinan
     
  9. Andy Kim

    Andy Kim Second Unit

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    I should've mentioned it was the Fly Away Home:SE version.
    I've got my TV calibrated to the THX Optimodes.
    I've been thinking about getting atleast the Sound and Vision disc but that just went up in price to ~$30 CAN.
    I'm going to wait for a sale and then pick up the S&V as the Avia disc is too pricey for me.
    Thanks.
     

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