Anyone know a lot about cooking and stuff?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Tim Kline, Jan 19, 2003.

  1. Tim Kline

    Tim Kline Stunt Coordinator

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    I have an old iron/steel/whatever wok that I used to use a lot, but I thought I'd cook something with it today but when I dug it out of the cabinet, it was rusted. There was rust all inside of it. Whoever used it last must have put it away wet or something [​IMG] So, I used some steel wool to get all the rust off, but there's still a rusty color to the metal that no matter how hard I scrub it just doesn't come off.
    So, I'm wondering... is this ruined and I may as well toss it and get a new one, or will I be able to cook with it now the way it is? It's clean as far as I can tell, it just appears to be discolored in parts...
    Any ideas?
     
  2. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    cast iron will do that, personally I'd use it. I don't know if it's bad for you or not.
     
  3. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    if it's rusted, i would toss it and start over. cast-iron skillets are not that expensive. i think you can even get them at target.

    the secret is to season the pan correctly. the first time you use it you'll want to follow the manufacturer's instructions - usually it involves warming the skillet and rubbing oil on the surface.

    then, after you start using it, you are *NOT* supposed to wash it. you simply wipe off the excess. this will allow the pan to season over time. eventually it will become non-stick on its own.

    i have one that i've been using for about three years. it works great.
     
  4. Anders Englund

    Anders Englund Second Unit

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    If the rust is not too bad, you'll probably be able to use it. Just oil it in real good first. Nothing beats a cast iron skillets when it comes to cooking. All those new, fancy, titanium-or-whatever things you can buy just won't compare.

    A friend of mine has a cast iron skillet from 1887. Man I wish that was mine!

    --Anders
     
  5. Eve T

    Eve T Supporting Actor

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    Yes, you can still use it. Just make sure to break it back in and make sure that it's very clean before you use it. (this means making sure the water runs clear with no signs of brown or rust particles)
    It's fine, you're fine, start cooking![​IMG]
     
  6. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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  7. terry deto

    terry deto Stunt Coordinator

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    Location:
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    barkeeper's friend
    in the cleaner isle
     
  8. Scott H

    Scott H Supporting Actor

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    Definitely do not toss it. If it rusted then it is high carbon steel, as any worthwhile wok would be, and rust is what they do. Unless very well seasoned or covered with grease, it would likely rust in storage, so this is not abnormal. In fact, the woks stacked in restaurant supply stores are usually covered with grease or oil so they don't rust while waiting to be sold.

    I recommend that you scrub it hard with green scouring pads, do not use steel wool (steel wool will not hurt it though). Wash and towel dry immediately then put over high heat and season it. For a wok I use Crisco, basically just cooking it onto the interior, until I get a nice hard blackish layer.

    If you wash it again you would have to dry it immediately and thoroughly to avoid rust. You would also not want to clean away your seasoning. I recommend a little water in the hot wok after cooking and wiping it down, but prob not handwashing. Definitely never put a real wok in a dishwasher.

    For a second opinion, if you search Google for information on wok care you should find much.
     
  9. Jon_Are

    Jon_Are Cinematographer

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    Everything Scott said, plus this:
    The discoloration (not talking about the rust here) is due to much use. It is an indication of a well-used wok and is usually considered a source of pride. You don't want a "clean", stainless wok; that would tip you off as a newbie. [​IMG]
    Woks are great, happy cooking.
    Jon
     
  10. David_Moechnig

    David_Moechnig Stunt Coordinator

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    It's just iron oxide, the same stuff that makes your blood red, I wouldn't have a problem using it.

    David
     

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