Anyone installed crown molding on a vaulted ceiling?

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by ken thompson, May 29, 2003.

  1. ken thompson

    ken thompson Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2000
    Messages:
    251
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I have a vaulted ceiling in my family room and I want to install crown molding. The room has a beam that spans the length of the ceiling along the apex. I was able to find out how to make the transition at the corner where the ceiling begins to rise but I can't visualize how to miter the corner at the apex where the wall meets the beam. I want to run the molding along the beam which cuts the ceiling into two separate sections if you will. Can anyone help?
     
  2. Jeff Engel

    Jeff Engel Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2002
    Messages:
    205
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I was wondering the same thing for my vaulted ceilings and while perusing new home construction in my neighborhood I saw how the pros do it. What you have to do is make a 3 piece corner. 2 sections of molding will not bridge a gap like that well. I'm not sure what angles you will need to cut but basically you cut both pieces close to the corner(about1-2 inches away) at some angle you will have to determine for your own situation. Then you a cut a small triangular piece(it looks like and upside down triangle when instaled) that has the complementary angles to the 2 other pieces already installed and voila, it done.

    I have no practical experience with this as my project is a few weeks away but I hope that will get you started to where you can figure it out.
     
  3. Mark Barnhill

    Mark Barnhill Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2003
    Messages:
    87
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    that situation requires a custom (raked) crown which would be a different width mould. The width depends on the angle of the crown where it meets the straight crown. I deal with that situation occasionally on structures where the crown comes down the eave of a building and dies into the gutters (or a trim matching the gutters).

    The only other alternative is to use corner blocks and let the crown die into those at the corners. Of course the blocks would have to be cut on an angle to fit the ceiling angle.
     

Share This Page