Anyone here brew your own beer?

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by greggor, Jul 10, 2003.

  1. greggor

    greggor Second Unit

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    My wife recently bought me a home brewing kit that I have been wanting for awhile and I just bottled my first batch which I should be enjoying in about one week.

    I was just curious if there are any other members of the forum who are brewing their own beer that would like to exchange some tips and maybe some recipes???

    I'll let you all know how the beer turns out

    Greg[​IMG]
     
  2. Daren Welsh

    Daren Welsh Supporting Actor

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    A buddy gave me a kit and I haven't used it yet. Where do I go to get ingredients?
     
  3. Paul_Fisher

    Paul_Fisher Screenwriter

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    I'm sure Ron does, he loves beer! [​IMG]
     
  4. Andrej Dolenc

    Andrej Dolenc Stunt Coordinator

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    I've been brewing for probably 5 or 6 years now. So far so good, every batch has been a success. Lots of ales, in the winter the basement gets cold enough to brew a lager beer. Recipes, tips, advice, got it all, just ask away!

    One thing that I've found is that beer does take a bit to mature in the bottles. They always say wait 2 weeks for carbonation in bottles, then you're ready to go. There's only a few beers that will be ready that quick, kinda depends on the yeast & how active it is. Most beers I wait 3 weeks until trying, by about a month in bottles it'll be awsome. Since this is your first batch, I'd say try one in a week or so, and see what it's like. If it's still flat, give it more time.

    Also try and save a few bottles of the batch, stash them and drink them in 4 or 5 months. The beer will keep improving for a while. May be hard to not drink them all, but it's worth it!

    I've had good luck finding recipes online here: http://brewery.org/gambmug/

    Daren, look in the yellow pages for homebrew supply stores. Barring that, you can mail order ingredients. I've had great luck with stuff from http://www.northernbrewer.com

    Andrej
     
  5. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    I've always wanted to brew my own, but lack of space as well as laziness on my part have precluded this.

    With lagers, how would you rate the home-brewed in terms of taste compared with a commercially available micro-brew?
     
  6. greggor

    greggor Second Unit

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    Thanks for the tips Andre. I just started brewing a Lager last night and I have it fermenting in a refrigerator at about 40 degrees. How long do you think it will take to ferment?
    I know I can gauge roughly when the fermentation process is complete by looking at the container for bubbles still rising. How long do lagers generally take to ferment?

    Darren,
    I have been using the canned hopps and barley in the form of syrup that came with my kit, however I would really like to get some fresh hops and barley and brew from scratch once I learn the basics.

    Greg
     
  7. Andrej Dolenc

    Andrej Dolenc Stunt Coordinator

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    Cool beans on having a fermenting fridge, I want to get one so I can do lagers year round.

    If you can raise the temperature in the fridge some, I'd say do so. Lager yeast has an optimum fermentation temperature of 50-55F or so. It will still ferment at a lower temp, but more slowly. The lagering process itself is when after fermentation is complete, you slowly lower the temperature, say a couple of degrees every few days. I wasn't able to do that, but the basement was cold enough to ferment it.

    Anyway, fermentation took about a week, then I transferred the beer to secondary to help clear out more of the sediment - clearer beer that way. Once in secondary, I let it sit there for 2 or 3 weeks, then bottle. It took a long time to carbonate, about 4 or 5 weeks. Beer was bottled in february (I think, will have to check at home to be sure), and it's still improving.

    One thing I do with my bottles is I write what type of beer and the bottling date on the bottle cap. Eliminates the guesswork of what beer will I be drinking next!

    On that note, it's time to get outa here and drink a beer!

    Andrej
     
  8. Grant B

    Grant B Producer

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    I tried it in college and spent quite a bit time on it. Never could get something I liked.
    Then I got a job and said the hell with it, buying it is easier .
    Good Luck
     
  9. greggor

    greggor Second Unit

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    Buying is much easier, but is it as much fun [​IMG]

    I have always enjoyed a good quality micro brew and I look forward to the day I create a master piece I can call my own.

    I think the enjoyment I get from making my own beer is worth a few less than perfect batches in the process.

    Greg
     
  10. greggor

    greggor Second Unit

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    By the way Andrej your links have been very helpfull. I'm learning alot, thanks.

    Greg
     
  11. Travis-J

    Travis-J Agent

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    I have done some brewing of my own beer, but I have always done it at a store, the first type I tried was god awful. Did it in college had them high-test it, (more sugar, more alcohol) man was that bad. My dad make a Corona style beer at a local place, and it's darn good.
     
  12. Jeff Ulmer

    Jeff Ulmer Producer

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    I've only made beer from kits some years ago. Had a couple of really good batches, but then something in the gear got screwed up and the batches started going bad on me. I was open fermenting, which I think was the problem. I should start up again, it is a fun hobby, although it would be better if I could set up a canister/CO2 system, rather than bottling, which is a bit of a chore, and never needed when I have spare time.

    My fave was a stout. Most of my other types were somewhat mediocre.
     
  13. greggor

    greggor Second Unit

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    Well I just drank a few beers from my first batch and I am pleasently surprised. The beer turned out very well, although its not the best beer I have ever had its actually pretty good. The color is darker than what I expected it to be which was a nice surprise since I prefer the darker ales over the lighter ones.

    This weekend I am going to attempt to brew my first all grain batch. A dark ale (Bass taste alike hopefully). Wish me luck!

    Greg
     
  14. Andrej Dolenc

    Andrej Dolenc Stunt Coordinator

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    I've stayed away from all grain because it just takes too damn long. With extract and /or partial mash, I can pick up the ingredients over lunch, and brew that same evening. All grain takes several hours longer for the mash process. True, you do get finer control over your finished beer that way, but partial mash can give you some great results.

    Andrej
     
  15. TimG

    TimG Second Unit

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    I have to agree with Andrej, all grain is just too time consuming. With work and two kids (1 and 4 yrs old), a partial mash is the only way to go. I finally got an old pop machine to hold my fermentor in so I can brew year round now and control the temp. Not to mention being able to distribute bottles out of the same machine. (Its two, two, two machines in one. :b ) Now I just need to dig out the old equipment and clean it up.

    TimG

    PS. A little hint, throw away that dry yeast that comes with the kit and buy some liquid yeast. It will improve the fermentation considerably and also makes the final product much tastier.
     
  16. greggor

    greggor Second Unit

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    I did that before brewing (fermenting) both batches of beer. Luckily I was advised to do this prior to making my first batch.

    Alot of people have said the same thing about brewing all grain. I just thought it would be fun just to see how the beer would turn out. I have down loaded some malt extract/partial grain recipes maybe I'll give one of them a shot. Probably the best way to go since I am just a beginner. Thanks for the advice.

    Greg
     
  17. TimG

    TimG Second Unit

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    Don't get me wrong, all-grain is fun to do, especially if you like to tweak recipies. But unfortunatly I just don't have the time to do it anymore. I also find it much more enjoyable if you have good equipment to work with. Go here:
    www.morebeer.com and check out their all-grain brewing systems. Very sharp [​IMG] Good luck, and don't forget to have a few pints while you are brewing.

    TimG
     
  18. greggor

    greggor Second Unit

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    Very nice Tim just a little out of my league right now.

    Do you guys have any good extract/partial mash recipes for a nice brown ale you would like to share with me? I know there are plenty of recipes online, but something proven would be nice.

    I found a relatively simple mash/extract recipe for a bass ale taste alike I'm going to make this weekend. I may have some questions for you guys once I obtain all my ingredients.

    Greg
     
  19. Andrej Dolenc

    Andrej Dolenc Stunt Coordinator

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    Here's a nut brown that I've done several times. Judging by how fast it dissapears, it must be a success!

    6.6 lbs gold malt extract (light)
    1 lb dark brown sugar
    1/4 lb roasted barley malt
    1/4 lb special b malt
    1/4 bisquit malt
    1/4 lb chocolate malt
    1 oz perle hops (@ 60 mins)
    1 oz fuggles hops (@ 1-2 mins)
    white labs burton ale yeast (or a similar wyeast strain)

    Andrej
     
  20. greggor

    greggor Second Unit

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    Andrej is this a 5 gallon recipe? how long are you boiling everything for prior to adding your hops? What is the OG and FG of the wort? Sorry for all the questions (I'm a newbie) Sounds like a great brew thanks.

    Greg
     

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