Anyone else notice how the tv screen is not completely filled in?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Youssef, Nov 23, 2001.

  1. Youssef

    Youssef Stunt Coordinator

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    This has bothered me for the LONGEST time. i still have yet to get a definite answer. here is my problem.
    i have a ps2 hooked up to component inputs on my brand new toshiba 24" flat screen tv. now whenever i play ANY game, the left edge and the right edge of the screen is NEVER completely filled up! It always seems to be curved! BTW, it happens to my dreamcast too. Does this happen to your set also? Does anyone know why? [​IMG]
     
  2. Morgan Jolley

    Morgan Jolley Lead Actor

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    On some of my TVs, the left edge is not completely filled in. On the "big" TV (I dunno what it actually is, its a projection screen) the left and right edges of the screen are not completely filled.

    Its not a big deal, quite common from what I know.
     
  3. AndyVX

    AndyVX Supporting Actor

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    I get something similar to this happening with every console. What happens to me is I have a roughly one inch black border around the entire image, and the image is shifted slighly to the left.

    This happens with every console I have hooked up. (Gamecube, Xbox, and PS2... and on my DC, before I moved it to my computer monitor in my bedroom)

    And no, I don't know what causes this. Sorry.
     
  4. Ugo Scarlata

    Ugo Scarlata Stunt Coordinator

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    Virtually all TV sets have a small percentage of the picture on all sides that is "hidden" from view (i.e. it goes beyond the physical edges of the screen.) This is known as overscan.
    Console manufacturers compensate for this by leaving picture information out of the overscan areas almost completely. They do so to ensure that valuable information that might appear close to the edges (such as health bars, points, etc...) is not lost due to a set's overscan.
    If your TV set overscans less than what the console manufacturer had anticipated, you will end up with a certain amount of underscan, or unused areas, around the edges of the picture.
    Most modern TV sets allow you to adjust the amount of horizontal and vertical overscan through their service menu. To get rid of the blank spaces in your video games, you would have to increase overscan until the picture reaches the edge of the screen on all sides.
    Increasing overscan is not a good idea however, since you would be losing even more picture information when watching DVDs or TV broadcasts. In fact, some home theater tweakers tend to do the opposite... We try to reduce the amount of overscan as much as possible, in order to get more picture information at the sides when watching DVDs. Unfortunately, this results in obscene amounts of underscan in video games. [​IMG]
    Cheers,
     

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