Anyone catch the Hurricane Katrina doc on HBO last night

Discussion in 'TV Shows' started by DaveF, Aug 22, 2006.

  1. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2001
    Messages:
    17,967
    Likes Received:
    1,542
    Location:
    One Loudoun, Ashburn, VA
    Real Name:
    David Fischer
    I strumbled onto a Hurricane Katrina / New Orleans doc on HBO last night. I came in about halfway through, and I was rivoted. I was on vacation when the hurricane hit so I didn't catch the breaking news, nor the blow-by-blow of who screwed up, who was heroic, etc. So this was eye opening, giving a better understanding of the susbequent politcal fallout.

    I beleive there's a second part tonight, which I will try and catch.

    Thoughts?
     
  2. Dave Scarpa

    Dave Scarpa Producer

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 1999
    Messages:
    5,351
    Likes Received:
    59
    Real Name:
    David Scarpa
    I have it on my DVR and will catch both parts later in the week.
     
  3. ErichH

    ErichH Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2001
    Messages:
    1,163
    Likes Received:
    0
    Great Work - not a typical Spike project, and certainly not as race heavy as it could be.

    Love that triple take Bush statement, and the where's Condi, Chaney, George section. Woops! The last few minutes are powerful and a hard slap in the face if you can imagine your community in the picture.
    Part 2 should be interesting when they get into all the fraud.

    E
     
  4. Randy Tennison

    Randy Tennison Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 1999
    Messages:
    1,099
    Likes Received:
    0
    Real Name:
    Randy
    Couldn't make it through a lot of it. The finger pointing, feel guilty portions were just too much. Accusing someone of blowing up the levee's is just too ridiculous.
     
  5. Dave Scarpa

    Dave Scarpa Producer

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 1999
    Messages:
    5,351
    Likes Received:
    59
    Real Name:
    David Scarpa
    I'm to the Point I would'nt put it past any of them to do anything. I hope to sse the Doc later this week.
     
  6. ErichH

    ErichH Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2001
    Messages:
    1,163
    Likes Received:
    0
  7. Nkosi

    Nkosi Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2003
    Messages:
    104
    Likes Received:
    0
    From a directorial/ technical perspective I thought the doc was very well made.

    As a piece of social commentary I thought it was a revelation. I disagree with the "finger-pointing" assessment previously made. To me that misses the deeper point of the doc.

    What the doc portrays is the real sadness, anger, frustration, helplessness, and disbelief felt on the part of the immediate victims of Katrina. What I saw presented were the lives of people... a community... Americans... affected by the worse natural disaster in this country's history. People who felt abandoned by their government/ safety-net. Yet through this visceral ordeal, were still able to muster up the courage to press on and endure. I saw the story of the indomitable spirit of the people of that region. I was humbled.
     
  8. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2001
    Messages:
    17,967
    Likes Received:
    1,542
    Location:
    One Loudoun, Ashburn, VA
    Real Name:
    David Fischer
    HBO has been off the air from my subscriber the past 24 hours, so I couldn't watch last night's episode. How was it?
     
  9. Brook K

    Brook K Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2000
    Messages:
    9,467
    Likes Received:
    0
    It was an outstanding film all-together. Act III did go a little off track getting into some of New Orleans music and cultural traditions, but otherwise it continued telling the ongoing story of Katrina's aftermath and the lack of resources for New Orleans' recovery.

    There were telling interviews with the Army Corps of Engineers and engineering experts from several universities that basically said the levees aren't being rebuilt any stronger than they were pre-Katrina. One expert talked about going to tour the flood defense system in the Netherlands which is built to withstand a 1-in-10,000 years weather event, and being embarrassed when he was asked to speak about the work being done in New Orleans.

    The Mardi Gras scenes were particularly moving, reflecting the festival as an integral part of the cultural and social identity of the city for its residents, rather than how most outsiders see it as a big party to get smashed and see some tits.

    Another powerful sequence is when a young man describes finding his mother's body in her house.

    I really liked the artfully done end credit sequence with each participant holding up a picture frame around their face and stating their name and where they're from.

    Nkosi is right about the "finger-pointing". The film gives voice to the voiceless, allowing them to express their frustration at being treated like 3rd class citizens. For a number of the interviewee's, they feel as if they've gotten the short end of the stick their whole lives. Of course they are going to be angry. They have many good reasons for being so.
     
  10. Henry Gale

    Henry Gale Producer

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 1999
    Messages:
    4,628
    Likes Received:
    1
    Just about halfway through this documentary.
    I have a favorite interview subject.
    Phyllis Montana Leblanc.
    Go ahead and give this woman her own talk show, she's the real deal.
     

Share This Page