Anybody here diabetic?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Leif Wall, Oct 23, 2002.

  1. Leif Wall

    Leif Wall Second Unit

    Joined:
    May 4, 2000
    Messages:
    402
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I ended up getting diabetes right before my 19th birthday. (now 23) It was tough at first, but I'm so used to it, it doesn't bother me too much anymore. Gotta shoot up twice a day and all. Both my grandmas have/had it, so I guess I got it through genetics. I miss chowing down on candy though, especially around halloween time.
     
  2. Frank Zimkas

    Frank Zimkas Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2002
    Messages:
    888
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Leif,
    My wife has diabetes had about 20 years now. She handles it better than I ever could. It amazes me that so few people understand how terrible it is. Most people think you take a shot and everything is cool. They have no idea what it does to your body over time! We hope and pray that a cure is found soon.

    I have been trying to talk here into getting the pump, my uncle uses it and has had really good results managing his sugar levels with it. He has better control now than he ever did!

    I realize that you hear this all the time from your family and from your doctor but here goes anyway...
    Stay in control of your sugar level!! A pain in the ass..yes! But so worth it!!
     
  3. Cameron Seaman

    Cameron Seaman Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 1998
    Messages:
    708
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I am! I got Type 1 about 6 years ago when I was 17. Not that big of a deal any longer, and I don't miss any of that crap I used to eat. My diet is much healthier now.

    For the past several months, I've been trying to get on an insulin pump, but have not been able to right now because of some insurance problems. I'm going to attempt again early next year.
     
  4. Jenna

    Jenna Second Unit

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2002
    Messages:
    485
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Leif, I'm not diabetic, however, I am a nurse and have seen the consequences of non-compliance by diabetics young and old. The complications that are brought on by those who fail to adhere to diet and medications are serious.

    Sure, it's a "bummer" to have to deprive yourself of sweets, not to mention those daily injections and fingersticks - BUT the alternatives are much, much worse! Stay with it!

    BTW, Halle Berry is a diabetic. I'm sure there are others who can provide motivation and support for you.

    Best of luck and hang in there!
    There are MUCH worse things in life to face....
     
  5. Mike__D

    Mike__D Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2000
    Messages:
    617
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    My father is... and I fear I will be, through genetics. Unfortuately, he doesn't have a great diet, and is obese as well. My family tries to get him to eat better, but most efforts fail [​IMG] He's got an "old-school" mentality that he'll be fine. He's a walking time-bomb... if only he'd recognize that...
    Mike D.
     
  6. LDfan

    LDfan Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 1998
    Messages:
    724
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    My wife is. She had surgery this summer and had problems controlling it afterwards. Ended up in the ER with DKA. It's a very serious disease but the majority of the public has no idea about.


    Jeff
     
  7. andrew markworthy

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 1999
    Messages:
    4,762
    Likes Received:
    12
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Psychologically speaking, type II diabetes is one of the hardest conditions for health professionals to get patients to maintain compliance on, because the effects of non-compliance are rarely immediate.

    I gave up *all* sugar in any shape or form and started curtailing my starch intake a year ago (not because of I have diabetes, but in part because I don't want to get type II in later life, and in any case starchy foods like bread and potatoes really don't suit my digestion). I can't claim I've suffered (barring once when a friend had to prise me off a patisserie window), but maybe I've just got odd tastes. However, I can sympathise when giving up these things is forced rather than voluntary. However, as others have said - stick at it.
     
  8. Cameron Seaman

    Cameron Seaman Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 1998
    Messages:
    708
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    A few people in my family have Type 2, and they aren't very motivated to keep it under control.

    People who get Type 2 usually get it later in life, and it is due somewhat to their diet. There for, it seems that it's hard to get a Type 2 to stay on track and not "cheat".

    There is also the misconception that since Type 2s do not have to take shots that their condition is less serious.
     
  9. andrew markworthy

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 1999
    Messages:
    4,762
    Likes Received:
    12
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  10. Cameron Seaman

    Cameron Seaman Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 1998
    Messages:
    708
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    You're exactly right Andrew, just a few facts I failed to mention/clarify.

    Diabetes runs in my family, and I am told that my Type 1 is purely genetic but not hereditary. Basically just something that I was born with which is somehow triggered and causes the diabetic condition.

    Have there been any theories on the cause/trigger of Type 1?
     
  11. LDfan

    LDfan Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 1998
    Messages:
    724
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I've heard/read that Type I MAY be caused by the Immune system attacking the pancreas which hinders or even destroys the ability to create insulin.


    jeff
     
  12. Frank Zimkas

    Frank Zimkas Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2002
    Messages:
    888
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I'm Frank's wife (he mentioned earlier that I am a diabetic). I was diagnosed as a Type I diabetic while in college. Even though some believe that it is hereditary no person in my family (as far back as we can trace) has ever been diagnosed with the disease, I'm the only "Lucky One". Yes, life does suck at times with diabetes but life can also go on. I have been blessed with two wonderful children since being a diabetic. I have felt like a guinea pig at times with trying different insulins in managing my sugar level. I have had to test up to 20 times a day (my fingers have looked like and felt like pin cushions), this was mainly while pregnant. Right now I take a shot every time I eat anything and another every night before bed. I also take a pill every day.

    Even though I have been a diabetic for almost 20 years, the struggle to stay away from sweets is at times daily. Yes, holidays (Halloween, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Easter, Valentines Day, etc.) seem to be centered around either candy or food. Those times are always the hardest. But, after a while you begin to feel good about yourself when you are able to pass up the things you know will screw up your system. Because we all know we pay and pay dearly for not abiding our diet!

    You may not notice any effects of high sugar levels now but after a while they do catch up with you, luckily I have not yet experienced any of the major side effects. However, I have experienced extreme lows where Frank has had to call 911 because he could not wake me up in the morning. So the drops in your sugar levels can be just as dangerous!

    Keep yourself busy to keep your mind away from the candy! You will Thank yourself years down the road!
     
  13. Leif Wall

    Leif Wall Second Unit

    Joined:
    May 4, 2000
    Messages:
    402
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    The really bad thing is when I turned 23 (last May) I was kicked off my parents insurance. So here I am with no health insurance. I need to find a job that offers it. I can't just afford it on my own. My hemoglobin A1C tests have generally been pretty good. For awhile they were in the low 7s, but the last two I had done they were in the 8s, which is not so great.
     
  14. Cameron Seaman

    Cameron Seaman Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 1998
    Messages:
    708
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  15. Sean P

    Sean P Agent

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 1998
    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Count me in as a type 2 diabetic. The wierd thing is how I was diagnosed. I had lost 40 pounds or so in about a month and a half. Looked a bit too thin, but didn't feel bad at all really. When I saw the Dr. he thought it was a thyroid thing until he checked my blood sugar-it was a bit over 400. I am going to agree that it does make you very aware of your diet. And it is wierd to think of candy as bad as a potato. And that Coke is worse than candy. But, over the last year or so, I've been cutting back more and more on carbs.

    Sigh. I do miss them sometimes. I can't get over the feeling like they're like that girlfriend in middle school that you knew was bad and you fought with 95% of the time. But that other 5% ...

    Sean P
     
  16. Jon_Are

    Jon_Are Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2001
    Messages:
    2,036
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Leif (and others),

    I'm not diabetic, but I'm an RN and part of my job is teaching new diabetics. Typically they're young adolescents, but we get some toddler-age as well.

    One thing I tell them - and their parents - is that, with this diabetic diet, they'll be eating far healthier than all their friends. Even to a non-diabetic, following the ADA is sound dietary advice.

    It is so important to monitor your blood sugars and keep it on an even keel. I've seen lots of non-compliant kids who already are showing advanced complications of the disease. Their futures are not bright.

     
  17. Stephen Orr

    Stephen Orr Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 1999
    Messages:
    1,099
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I was diagnosed with diabetes in late 1998 at the age of 39 (although my military medical records indicated that I had numbers over 145 as early as 1996.) I recently retired from the Navy and completely modified my diet to a low carb/high protein regime to get the diabetes as completely under control as possible (Working, BTW. I've lost 20 lbs in three months and my sugars are in the 80-130 range pretty much all the time, except for right when I wake up.) Insurance is a big issue, and the only things that are really helping me out is that I can convert my military insurance over to whole life at the same rate without my health being a consideration. My teaching job also provides insurance equivalent to two years of my pay automatically. So I'm covered up to about $320,000 without my diabetes being a factor.
     

Share This Page