Anybody have pics of Parts Express 250 watt amp??

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by SteveSpoon, Jul 29, 2002.

  1. SteveSpoon

    SteveSpoon Stunt Coordinator

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    Specifically, looking for the "business end" of the amp. I've seen pics of the outside of the amp (where you plug everything in at, knobs, heat sinc, etc.), but would like to know what the other side, or the inside of the amp looks like.

    Trying to figure out whether or not I'm going to cut a hole in my new enclosure, or "piggyback" the amp onto my sub. Any help appreciated.

    Thanks.

    Steve
     
  2. Joe Meissner

    Joe Meissner Stunt Coordinator

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    the back is all electronics. you should build a box to piggy back it.
     
  3. Joe Meissner

    Joe Meissner Stunt Coordinator

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    here is a pic from patrick suns plate amp box project that kinda shows the amp.
    [​IMG]
     
  4. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    This is a better shot:
    [​IMG]
     
  5. SteveSpoon

    SteveSpoon Stunt Coordinator

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    Oh man, you guys are beautiful!! Thanks a lot!!

    One question, though. If I decide to "piggyback", wonder how hot the amp would get in the smaller enclosure? I realize the cooling fins are on the outside, but was curious if putting the amp in the "piggyback" enclosure would make the amp run hotter.

    Actually, might as well come clean with this question as well: Do you think you lose that much sound by cutting a hole in the rear of the enclosure and mounting the amp vs. "piggybacking"? Or asking the same question in another flavor, do you think it's worth it by "piggybacking", or should I just go ahead and cut the hole in the rear of the enclosure, mount the amp, and be done with it? Am I getting carried away with my project?

    Thanks again.

    Steve
     
  6. Joe Meissner

    Joe Meissner Stunt Coordinator

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    i think its just a matter of personel preference. I see no problems with cutting the hole in the box. thats what i did and couldnt be happier. but if you have the room for a seperate amp and someday might want to power your sub with a different amp then by all means piggy back it.[​IMG]
     
  7. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Producer

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    Steve,
    You're thinking WAAAAY too hard about this! The amp is made to be inside an enclosure. How large or small isn't an issue as long as the amp fits. That's what the heatsinks on the plate are for. There's no need for extra ventilation or anything. IMH), the only reason to mount the amp in a separate enclosure "piggybacked" on the subwoofer is if you want to have the option of upgrading the amplification later on. If that's not an issue, then cut a hole in the box and screw that puppy in place! [​IMG]
    Brian
     
  8. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    If you piggy-back the amp, you won't subject the amp to internal bass stress. If you pop in hole, you will.

    What you could do it pop in some ventilation holes on the top/bottom/sides of the piggy-back enclosure portion if you're really that concerned about the heat build-up of the amp.
     
  9. Ryan Schnacke

    Ryan Schnacke Supporting Actor

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    I piggy backed mine. Built an almost cube sealed sub with the DVC and made the right/left sides extend beyond the back panel. Then I attached a 2nd back panel to hold the amp. The 2nd back panel is about 2/3 as tall as the other vertical panels and is mounted flush to the top so that there's a big hole at the bottom to draw in fresh air. Then I covered most of the gap at the top (between the two back panels) leaving a thin slot for warm air to escape.

    3 advantages I see:
    No loss of stuctural integrity by cutting a big hole in the box.
    Better cooling.
    No polyfill stuffing against the warm/hot transformer.

    The transformer on my 300-794 stays very warm all the time - even after hours in standby mode. If I ever make a stand alone box for the amp it'll definately have vents.
     

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