Any problems with sand fillable stands made of wood?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by jeff lam, Jan 24, 2002.

  1. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    I need to build stands for my MB1 monitors and am throwing around some ideas. I was told to get good quality sand fillable stands because they were worth it. I don't really like the round metal pole look and am wondering if there will be any issues with building the column with wood and filling it with sand. I saw these in Sound & Vision and thought they looked nice. I would like to build some like these(below) but with wood where the Black is and glue oak or another exotic wood to the sides. I would make the wood column hollow for sand. Would this be OK to do or should I forget the whole sand idea and just use a solid wood column?

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    Sand-filled is preferable because you can adjust the center of gravity to keep the stand more stable from being tipped over. Remember to put the sand in a bag (less messy) before sticking it in the hollow portion of the stand.
     
  3. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    Thanks for the reply Pat. What kind of bag would fit in a long tube? Did you mean 1 bag or many small bags? so, do you think sand in wood will be OK?
     
  4. Brian Steeves

    Brian Steeves Second Unit

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    Something like this perhaps...?
    Stands under construction In the first, second and fouth photos, behind the stand, you can see the top plates that have been painted but not mounted yet. The stands were filled entirely with sand that had been baked in the sun to dry out. There was no way for me to put "bags" in the stands as they are heavily braced all the way down with opposing pieces of 4/4"x8/4" Popalar (one one way then the other all the way down about every 4").
    Finsihed product
     
  5. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    Sweet Brian! Very nice. Very much like what I'm shooting for except I think yours are bigger than I'm planning for mine. My monitors are only 8"X10" on bottom so I figure my top plate should be maybe 6"X8", so my center column would be 4"X6". I think that should work nicely.

    Thanks for the construction pics, they should help out a lot.
     
  6. Dan Wesnor

    Dan Wesnor Second Unit

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    Do yourself a favor and don't spend too much time looking for oak in the "Exotic Woods" section of your local lumber yard. [​IMG]
     
  7. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    Well, you know what I mean. I'm not a very knowledgeable guy when it comes to wood other than MDF, but I am learning. BTW, what type of wood do you suppose are on the stands anyway?

    Brian, what did you use for the sides in your stands?
     
  8. Brian Steeves

    Brian Steeves Second Unit

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  9. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    Brian,

    Is it difficult to veneer a roundover? How did you get the veneer to stay and not crack or split? I haven't done any veneering yet and it seems like it would be difficult to veneer a roundover, especially if the roundover is where the veneer stops.
     
  10. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Producer

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    Jeff,

    Well, I'm not Brian Steeves but I think it you use a 10mil paper backed veneer and at least a 3/4" roundover you can easily bend the veneer around it. Anything smaller than 3/4" and you may have to wet the veneer to get it to bend.

    Brian
     
  11. Brian Steeves

    Brian Steeves Second Unit

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    Jeff,

    The round-overs on both the speakers and the stands are 1/2". Doing the veneering was a little time consuming because I used the dry bond method (thinned yellow glue on both surfaces, allow to just dry, with a lot of pressure iron the 2 pieces togther).I probably could have used contact cement but its not as forgiving and may someday loose it's hold, especially if I used a solvent based finish.

    As long as you don't try to bend against the grain you shouldn't have any problems with splitting.

    Another option instead of veneer for the sides was solid wood but that can be expensive and besides I already had the venner left over from the speakers.
     
  12. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    Brian,

    Thats what I thought you did(use a solid peice of wood). That's why I asked what type of wood you used. I think this may be easier for me considering I have never done veneering before. BTW, how much more expensive is it to get a solid peice of OAK or whatever else would look nice?
     
  13. Brian Steeves

    Brian Steeves Second Unit

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    Well in your case it's probably cheaper to get the solid wood vs. veneer. But it really depends on what species of wood you're going to use. Oak is relatively inexpensive compared to some of the more exotic woods. Now if you wanted to go exotic then I would defintely say veneer is cheaper.

    I would suggest going to your local lumber yard and look around at some of the different species to get an idea. Home Depot and Lowes usually only have Oak, Poplar, and Pine. You may need to look in the Yellow pages under builder supply to find a place that has some more selection.
     
  14. Chuck_C

    Chuck_C Stunt Coordinator

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    Instead of sand, how about using small gravel? The weight would be about the same and you wouldn't have to worry about leakage.

    I bought some filled "Sand Bags" for the rear of my wife's car for more rear weight for driving in the snow. When one got broken, I found that it was loaded with small gravel and not actual "sand". This would seem to be about the right size aggregate.
     
  15. Brian Steeves

    Brian Steeves Second Unit

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    Kitty litter can also be used.
     
  16. Tom Held

    Tom Held Agent

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    Jeff,

    Only use Play Sand, found at any home improvement store, and you should bake it at low heat in the oven on a shallow pan to remove any moisture.

    Tom
     

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