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Any other two Technicolor films pre 1930 that could look at as good as King Of Jazz? (1 Viewer)

RobertMG

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Any other two Technicolor films pre 1930 that could look at as good as King Of Jazz? First of all do negs exist on any of the HUGE musicals pre 1930 the type all studios were doing and are any as enjoyable as KIng Of Jazz
 
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Arthur Powell

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Going off of my memory, the only surviving two-color features with surviving camera negative elements are King of Jazz (cut for the 1933 reissue), The Toll of the Sea, The Black Pirate, Whoopee!, and Follow Thru.
 

RobertMG

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Going off of my memory, the only surviving two-color features with surviving camera negative elements are King of Jazz (cut for the 1933 reissue), The Toll of the Sea, The Black Pirate, Whoopee!, and Follow Thru.
The best of the bunch seems to be Follow Thru wonder who owns the negs Paramount or Universal -
 

RobertMG

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Would be great if Criterion is reading this!
Though many of these films have been lost or were destroyed by the original studios, the original camera negative of Follow Thru survives in its entirety and in excellent condition. It has been preserved by the UCLA Film and Television Archive.
 

compson

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I tend to think that it would be Universal due to the 1950s MCA acquisition, but I could be wrong. From what I have heard, there are some rights issues with Follow Thru that currently preclude any release.
From a site I’ve not heard of:

“One of over 700 Paramount Productions, filmed between 1929 and 1949, which were sold to MCA/Universal in 1958 for television distribution, and have been owned and controlled by Universal ever since. However, because of legal complications, this particular title was not included in the original television package and may not have ever been televised.”


Sounds like a worthwhile project:

“[T]oday, when its contemporaries survive in severely compromised versions or have been lost outright, the original camera negative of Follow Thru remains intact, yielding a restoration that beautifully reproduces the limited but ethereal palette of early Technicolor.”

 

Arthur Powell

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From a site I’ve not heard of:

“One of over 700 Paramount Productions, filmed between 1929 and 1949, which were sold to MCA/Universal in 1958 for television distribution, and have been owned and controlled by Universal ever since. However, because of legal complications, this particular title was not included in the original television package and may not have ever been televised.”


Sounds like a worthwhile project:

“[T]oday, when its contemporaries survive in severely compromised versions or have been lost outright, the original camera negative of Follow Thru remains intact, yielding a restoration that beautifully reproduces the limited but ethereal palette of early Technicolor.”

https://www.cinema.ucla.edu/events/2015/11/01/follow-thru-becky-sharp
This is how the UCLA restoration of Follow Thru is credited:
Restored by UCLA Film & Television Archive in cooperation with Universal Pictures with funding provided by the AFI/NEA Preservation Grants Program, The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and the Mary Pickford Foundation.
 

RobertMG

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From a site I’ve not heard of:

“One of over 700 Paramount Productions, filmed between 1929 and 1949, which were sold to MCA/Universal in 1958 for television distribution, and have been owned and controlled by Universal ever since. However, because of legal complications, this particular title was not included in the original television package and may not have ever been televised.”


Sounds like a worthwhile project:

“[T]oday, when its contemporaries survive in severely compromised versions or have been lost outright, the original camera negative of Follow Thru remains intact, yielding a restoration that beautifully reproduces the limited but ethereal palette of early Technicolor.”


https://www.cinema.ucla.edu/events/2015/11/01/follow-thru-becky-sharp
This is how the UCLA restoration of Follow Thru is credited:
Restored by UCLA Film & Television Archive in cooperation with Universal Pictures with funding provided by the AFI/NEA Preservation Grants Program, The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and the Mary Pickford Foundation.
Does anyone know when the copyright expires? This would be right up Criterions alley
 

compson

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I believe a copyright like this generally lasts 95 years. Until copyrights involved here expire, the situation appears complicated:

”The 1930 Paramount musical ‘Follow Thru’ was based on a stage musical by the songwriting and producing team of Da Sylva, Brown and Henderson. In order to produce its film version, Paramount agreed that rights would revert to Da Sylva, Brown and Henderson after a specified length of time. With the cooperation of Universal Pictures, which now owns the Paramount film library from that period, UCLA preserved ‘Follow Thru.’ Universal claims, however, that it has been unable to locate the current owners of the stage version in order to negotiate a new contract. Today, the studio allows UCLA to exhibit ‘Follow Thru’ in its own theater, and to loan prints to other archives, but at its own risk. To protect itself, UCLA requires that borrowers sign a letter of indemnification, but it is uncertain how much protection this would actually afford if a copyright claimant came forward and objected to UCLA distributing the film.”

 

RobertMG

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I believe a copyright like this generally lasts 95 years. Until copyrights involved here expire, the situation appears complicated:

”The 1930 Paramount musical ‘Follow Thru’ was based on a stage musical by the songwriting and producing team of Da Sylva, Brown and Henderson. In order to produce its film version, Paramount agreed that rights would revert to Da Sylva, Brown and Henderson after a specified length of time. With the cooperation of Universal Pictures, which now owns the Paramount film library from that period, UCLA preserved ‘Follow Thru.’ Universal claims, however, that it has been unable to locate the current owners of the stage version in order to negotiate a new contract. Today, the studio allows UCLA to exhibit ‘Follow Thru’ in its own theater, and to loan prints to other archives, but at its own risk. To protect itself, UCLA requires that borrowers sign a letter of indemnification, but it is uncertain how much protection this would actually afford if a copyright claimant came forward and objected to UCLA distributing the film.”

UNBELIEVABLE! No one can find relatives of DaSylva he was a Paramount exec for years! DaSylva passed 1950 Ray Henderson 1970 guess we have to wait to any chance of copyright expires looks like no heirs so good chance no more copyright
 
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RobertMG

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I believe a copyright like this generally lasts 95 years. Until copyrights involved here expire, the situation appears complicated:

”The 1930 Paramount musical ‘Follow Thru’ was based on a stage musical by the songwriting and producing team of Da Sylva, Brown and Henderson. In order to produce its film version, Paramount agreed that rights would revert to Da Sylva, Brown and Henderson after a specified length of time. With the cooperation of Universal Pictures, which now owns the Paramount film library from that period, UCLA preserved ‘Follow Thru.’ Universal claims, however, that it has been unable to locate the current owners of the stage version in order to negotiate a new contract. Today, the studio allows UCLA to exhibit ‘Follow Thru’ in its own theater, and to loan prints to other archives, but at its own risk. To protect itself, UCLA requires that borrowers sign a letter of indemnification, but it is uncertain how much protection this would actually afford if a copyright claimant came forward and objected to UCLA distributing the film.”

In a weird way that would be good if a claimant came forward a deal might be doable
 

RobertMG

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UNBELIEVABLE! No one can find relatives of DaSylva he was a Paramount exec for years! DaSylva passed 1950 Ray Henderson 1970 guess we have to wait to any chance of copyright expires looks like no heirs so good chance no more copyright

It was originally Paramount. Paramount remade it in 1956. I don't know whether they still own it.
Good chance Paramount if they remade it
 

ajabrams

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Both of these films (Follow Thru and The Vagabond King) would be great releases. I've seen both theatrically - Follow Thru looks great and The Vagabond King has come stunning color design. They need to be more available!
 

RobertMG

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Both of these films (Follow Thru and The Vagabond King) would be great releases. I've seen both theatrically - Follow Thru looks great and The Vagabond King has come stunning color design. They need to be more available!
King Of Jazz was stunning wish these others would come to video sad they are locked away ---
 
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