Any none electricians install their own breakers here?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Kevin. W, Sep 25, 2001.

  1. Kevin. W

    Kevin. W Screenwriter

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    I am contemplating installing a seperate line for my HT and was wondering if anyone in this forum has done it him/herself? I have found a website that demonstrates it but was curious of others experiences.
    Kevin
     
  2. Wes

    Wes Screenwriter

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    Wes Peterson
    I just installed 3 new breakers in the main panel at my house, 3 of which goes to the dedicated theater. I have the (I believe is a) new type of the Square D brand. The breakers themselves just hook on one side then press into the space. Its real easy. I did install the breakers with the panel still hot/live. But I shut down the main breaker out side the house to wire them. I took perhaps a half hour to wire all 5 new circuits I put in. I bought the breakers that are doubled, they are the exact size of a regular single pole breaker. I only had 3 empty spaces in the panel so these worked great and gave me 4 new 20amp and two new 15 amp breakers. Just for info I ran one 20amp to the boys new bedroom outlets, a 15amp for their lights, two 20amp for the theater equipment and one more 15amp for the theater lights.
    Wes
     
  3. Kevin T

    Kevin T Screenwriter

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    i'm considering installing a dedicated circuit as well for my home theater...what is the website address that gives info about doing this? also, what's the difference between a 40a, 20a, and 15a circuit (besides the amp rating of course)? would a 40 or 30 amp circuit be overkill for a home theater or is there no such thing as too much? i'm not much an electrician i know but i have easy access to all the wiring in my attic so i'm certain i can do this myself. any info would be greatly appreciated. thanks.
    kevin t
     
  4. Kevin. W

    Kevin. W Screenwriter

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    Kevin,
    Below is the link for the website. I basically did a yahoo search and came up with this. I think the difference between breakers(40,30,etc) is just the load that it can carry. Although the higher you go in rating I believe the lower the gauge wire you have to use.
    Kevin
    http://www.hammerzone.com/archives/e...er/install.htm
     
  5. Gene Severn

    Gene Severn Stunt Coordinator

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    I've installed many new circuits, lighting as well as outlets. No big deal. Two or three dedicated 20A circuits would be adequate depending on the current requirements. Many good books are available in Home Depot on the subject. A 20A circuit requires 12 AWG conductors. Romex is much easier to work with than BX. An inexpensive voltmeter is mandatory in order to check your work BEFORE you plug in any equipment.
     
  6. Brandon B

    Brandon B Second Unit

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    I am adding the same ones as Wes above. I would add that unless you have a component that draws more than 20 amps all by itself, you should stay at 20 amp breakers, not 30 or 40. You can get "thin" breakers that have 2 20's in one space, whereas any 30 will at least take one space by itself. You will have to run 2 sets of romex this way, but you get 40 amps of power.
    If you have a 30 or 40 amp breaker, and something goes pfft at the other end and it's the only thing plugged in, you'd probably rather it didn't have access to 40 amps all by itself.
    BB
     
  7. Derrick G

    Derrick G Stunt Coordinator

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    Kevin W.
    You are correct about needing larger wire. The National Electric Code calls for 14 AWG (gauge) wire for 15A, 12 AWG for 20a, 10 AWG for 30A, and 8AWG for 40A.
    Kevin T.
    You can't use 20A circuits on standard 110V outlets. Standard electrical outlets like the ones you get at Lowes or Home Depot are only rated at 15 or 20 amps. When you buy the outlets look carefully on them for the amperage rating and get the 20amp versions. If you need more than 20 amps then install multiple circuits. I would also suggest spending the 4 or 5 dollars for an outlet checker. Its the little yellow thing with the leds that you plug into the outlet and it tells you if the outlet is wired correctly. Its a handy little gadget.
    Get a how-to book from Lowes or Home Depot. Wiring is pretty simple, just be careful, go slow, and you won't get electrocuted.
    Derrick G.
     

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