Any Burn-In Reduction Technology Coming?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Brennan Hill, Feb 15, 2002.

  1. Brennan Hill

    Brennan Hill Stunt Coordinator

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    Is there any technology on the horizon that will reduce or even eliminate the problem of screen burn-in with RPTV's?

    I'm looking to buy a RPTV in about a year and am just starting to do some research. I would prefer a widescreen set, but with kids in the house we do a lot more Disney Channel then DVD.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Steve Zatkoff

    Steve Zatkoff Stunt Coordinator

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    Reduce the contrast to about 30%. When you first turn on the RPTV it will be in Burn mode(about 80 to 100%contrast). This is the way these TV's are shipped and usually displayed in the stores.
     
  3. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

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    I would think more RPTV manufacturers will be moving to LCD or DLP projection(or even the reclusive GLV... hello SONY! where are you with that?)which has no burn-in. There are a few out there now, but the prices are high.

    I can't say what you will see out there in a year, but I think eventually they will become more common and the prices will drop. Possibly when the next wave of new technology is released (GLV & LCOS?) the DLPs and LCDs will become more available.
     
  4. Kevin P

    Kevin P Screenwriter

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    Unless someone comes up with a phosphor formula that doesn't degrade with use, the only viable burnin-resistant technologies at present are LCD, DLP, and DILA (and possibly other similar technologies that don't use phosphor).

    Unfortunately these technologies are still expensive and don't quite live up to the quality CRT can provide (esp. in black level and contrast). Also, at present these technologies require an expensive bulb replacement every 1000-2000 hours or so. CRTs with care will last 10,000-20,000 hours.

    KJP
     

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