Any $500-ish receivers out there that can handle 4-ohm speakers?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by BenG, Feb 20, 2002.

  1. BenG

    BenG Agent

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    Thinking about getting some of those wonderful Magnepan MMGs, and I'm pretty sure that my old receiver will not handle them. Here is what I am looking for:
    - Great sound quality. My usage is about 70% music, 30% HT.
    - Enough wattage to push the power-hungry MMGs (like 87db sensitivity, I think), although I dont push my speakers anywhere near ear-bleeding levels at all.
    - Dolby Digital/DTS, nothing fancy there. If it were 6-channel, all the better, but not absolutely necessary at this point.
    I've come to the conclusion that most (all?) "good" speakers seem to be 4-ohm, so this is rather important to me. However, I dont have much money to spend at the moment [​IMG] Is it unrealistic to expect all of the above features out of a receiver at this price point?
    I appreciate any suggestions!
     
  2. RichardH

    RichardH Supporting Actor

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    Well, I set up my friend's home theater with an Onkyo 595 and Ascend Acoustics speakers all around (they are all 4 Ohm). There is a 4 Ohm switch on the back of the 595, which I enabled. It has no problem cranking out serious volume with all 5 speakers being 4 Ohm, so I wouldn't worry about the MMGs. BTW, the MMGs as a 4 Ohm load is supposed to be easier to handle for amps than most dynamic 4 Ohm speakers. This has to do with their reactance and the impedance curve with respect to frequency.
     
  3. Eujin

    Eujin Supporting Actor

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    Off the top of my head, I know that Sony and Yamaha support 4ohm loads. Not sure of the specific models, but the Yammie HTR-5490 will definitely do it and is around your price range.
     
  4. Kevin P

    Kevin P Screenwriter

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    The Outlaw 1050 has a 4/8 ohm switch. The 65 watt per channel rating is very conservative; this unit will punch out cleaner power at 65 watts than most so-called "120 wpc" receivers out there. It seems to fit your criteria, and it's well built to boot, for $500.

    KJP
     
  5. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    I would expect Marantz, Denon, Onkyo and Harmon Kardon receivers in that price range to be able to handle 4ohm operation. All have relatively stout amps for their price range.

    I listen to more music than HT, so I chose Marantz. IMO, they do the best job at music of those I listed. Give the SR5200 and SR6200 an audition.

    Yes, people will say that there are quality issues with Marantz, but I have heard issues for each and every manufacturer, so you it is the same chance you take with each. I am very happy with my 6200.
     
  6. ReggieW

    ReggieW Screenwriter

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    I agree with John. The Marantz AVR's are the best when it comes to two-channel music imho. I have a Denon 1802, and though it sounds good, I managed to give the Marantz units mentioned here a listen, and they definitely excel in the music department. If you would primarily use it for HT, I'd say go with Denon or Onkyo. I don't know what Marantz has done, but they certainly have an edge over their competitors when it comes to music. Hoever, I think all of these manufacturer's should be able to handle a 4-OHM load.

    Reg
     

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