another TV salesman comment to debunk

Discussion in 'Displays' started by kurtZoom, Feb 14, 2005.

  1. kurtZoom

    kurtZoom Stunt Coordinator

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    I was checking out TVs at Ultimate electronics last night. I was trying to compare Sony LCD RP and Mits DLP RP in both HD (via cable) and SD. I asked the salesman what sort of calibration they do.

    He said the new "digital TVs" don't need any calibration they are perfect out of the box. They don't do any adjustments to the TVs on display. He said only the older rear projection units need to be calibrated.

    BTW - as they sat at that store...the Mits DLP looked much better in SD than the Sony. But since they evidently were not calibrated...who knows. I could only get 6 feet back from either TV to view so could not replicate what I'll actually be seeing.

    Any thoughts?
     
  2. Alf S

    Alf S Cinematographer

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    You don't need to ISF calibrate either type of set from what I've read. You only really need to hardcore tweak the old style CRT rear projection units.

    My parents got the Mitsu 52725 DLP and after a few adjustments on the menu, the picture quality looks pristine.

    BTW, SD pic quality is GREAT on all the non-HDTV cable channels...Mitsu has some kind of technology built into these sets to help make that happen. It's listed on their website.

    Note that they are using the Cox Cablecard.
     
  3. Michael TLV

    Michael TLV THX Video Instructor/Calibrator

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    Greetings

    I don't know about ISF'ing, but the grayscale on these units is just as screwed up as on any other technology.

    "My new car never needs a tune up or oil change."

    If you want accurate colour rendition, you still need professional calibration ... or rent the test equipment yourself and do it. You won't be getting it out of the box.

    The marketing of TV's to the general public has very little to do with presenting accurate images. It's about giving people an image market research says people will buy.

    Regards
     
  4. Steve_L_B

    Steve_L_B Stunt Coordinator

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    Unlike CRT based RPTVs, digital TVs do not need to have the convergence and geometry adjusted (in most cases, these cannot be adjusted). However, they still benefit greatly from having the gray scale, color, brightness, black level (and in some cases the focus) adjusted properly. Most of these adjustments need to be done for each input and signal type (e.g. component, svid, 480i, 480p, and HD signals). ISF techs have the special equipment (which costs much more than most TVs) and knowledge to make all of the necessary adjustments.

    ISF calibration isn't required, but it will certainly enable your display to provide the best PQ possible.

    -Steve
     
  5. Michael TLV

    Michael TLV THX Video Instructor/Calibrator

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    Greetings

    Pretty much sums it up. It's not a requirement ... but if you want the most out of the set ... it should be considered. Or else you won't be getting the most out of the set.

    Typically, a conventional crt based rptv might come OOTB in a 60% state ... with the potential of reaching 100% when fully calibrated.

    A typical digital RPTV might come OOTB in a 75% state ... but only with the potential of reaching 90% when fully calibrated.

    Regards
     
  6. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    WRONG!

    Not to mention that with some single-chip DLPs, the things you can move around manually is pretty stunning. You can alter the primary chromaticities, and sometimes the secondaries as well. *ALL* displays benefit from proper calibration, and sometimes tweaking too.

    But the comment from the sales guy isn't at all surprising.
     
  7. kurtZoom

    kurtZoom Stunt Coordinator

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    interesting..I'm glad I found this site and am not solely depending on salespeople for info

    How does using the commercial set up DVDs (like Avia) compare to a ISF calibration?
    How much does it generally cost to have a LCD RPTV ISF calibrated? and where do you locate these guys?

    OK and to display my ignorance...what does ISF stand for?
     
  8. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    Imaging Science Foundation: http://www.imagingscience.com/

    ISF calibration usually involves grayscale calibration, which requires colorimetry equipment. Calibration discs like Avia, DVE, Avia PRO can all be used in conjunction with colorimetry equipment to get accurate and precise grayscale tracking, but without the equipment, you are limited to what you can get by eye on grayscale, which is not so precise. However, these discs are *EXCELLENT* for getting white levels, black levels, color saturation, color balance, and sharpness(if necessary) correct, as well as checking many aspects of a display's performance.
     
  9. RomanSohor

    RomanSohor Second Unit

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    As someone who works part time in a Best Buy Home Theater department I am assuming the salesman thought calibration meant convergance... Unless the guy is an HT professional, then it's just sad that he didn't know what you meant.

    Best Buy (at least the one that I work at) gives no one any real technical training.

    I don't know how many co-workers I've astounded with my "vast" knowledge of what 3:2 pulldown is....
     

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