Another sound question for Guy

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by John Tyrone, Oct 22, 2001.

  1. John Tyrone

    John Tyrone Agent

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    Hi. O.K I've got a sony str-de845. Looks like I can adjust crossover frequency in 30hz steps from 60hz-180hz. Inital settings are 120hz for all speakers. Does this sound right?
    Also it has a sub level adjustment from -10 to +10db, initial setting is 0db.(Will I want to make volume adjustments from the reciever or the powered sub volume level?)
    LFE mix level is set at 0db, states that 0 outputs the full lfe signal determined by the recording engineer. But it can be adjusted in 1 db steps from -20db to 0.
    DTS LFE mix level is set at 0db, but can adjust from -20db-+10db. The manual states that the dts lfe mix is set to +10db and LFE is at 0 because there is an intial difference of 10db in the overall mix between dolby digital and dts lfe channel levels.
    Now where I'm really confused is the equalizer if it's used or not? The manual says I can adjust bass level and frequency, midrange and treble. I haven't messed with any of these.
    Do I need to mess with the equalizer when watching movies? All I do now is use the auto format decode button, and use the main volume??
    John
     
  2. Guy Kuo

    Guy Kuo Supporting Actor

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    >>>Looks like I can adjust crossover frequency in 30hz steps from 60hz-180hz. Inital settings are 120hz for all speakers. Does this sound right?
    You have a system that allows the crossover point to be adjusted. That is nice if your mains and sub don't happen to meet their middle ground at the standard 80 Hz. The way I would approach finding the best crossover would be to make frequency reponse plots of the sub alone with crossover set as high as possible, and a plot of a main alone with the crossover set as low as possible. You'll have to either disconnect or turn off the other speaker to fully isolate the readings so the plots are only from the speaker being examined. Then it is a matter of selecting a crossover point at which both the sub and mains still have good response. Leave about an octave of response beyond the crossover for each speaker. It's debatable which main speaker to choose as the standard. I tend to use the center whenever it is practical since it carries the majority of signal in movie tracks, but if stereo music is more important, then I'd choose either the left or right main.
    Unless you are willing to go do the isolated plots, it's probably best to just go with the usually safe 80 Hz. As the crossover freq goes up the risk of higher freq sounds from the sub becoming localizable increases. If you choose too low a crossover freq, your mains will be stressed unnecessarily into low bass reproduction while the sub goes underutilized.
    >>>Also it has a sub level adjustment from -10 to +10db, initial setting is 0db.(Will I want to make volume adjustments from the reciever or the powered sub volume level?)>>LFE mix level is set at 0db, states that 0 outputs the full lfe signal determined by the recording engineer. But it can be adjusted in 1 db steps from -20db to 0.
    DTS LFE mix level is set at 0db, but can adjust from -20db-+10db. The manual states that the dts lfe mix is set to +10db and LFE is at 0 because there is an intial difference of 10db in the overall mix between dolby digital and dts lfe channel levels.>>>Now where I'm really confused is the equalizer if it's used or not? The manual says I can adjust bass level and frequency, midrange and treble. I haven't messed with any of these.
    Do I need to mess with the equalizer when watching movies? All I do now is use the auto format decode button, and use the main volume??
    The equalizer in the reciever is just a slightly more fancy tone control. It may be useful for crudely shaping the sound, but it usually lacks sufficiently fine separation of control bands to be really effective. I suspect most people will tell you to just leave it flat or off. If your speakers are positioned in the rooom for flattest response, you shouldn't need the equalizer to make things enjoyable. Then again somebody out there probably does like the big "smile" across the eq band controls.
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    Guy Kuo
    www.ovationsw.com
    Ovation Software, the Home of AVIA DVD
     

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