Angle Iron for Sub bracing?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Fred Seger, Feb 8, 2001.

  1. Fred Seger

    Fred Seger Stunt Coordinator

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    Is there any reason not to use angle iron as sub bracing?
     
  2. Dean Cooper

    Dean Cooper Supporting Actor

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    Don't think so, the sound waves comming from a sub should be too low to excite them so give it a shot.
    Dean
     
  3. Rick P.

    Rick P. Stunt Coordinator

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    Problem with angle iron is that you need to fasten it to the wood, presumably with screws. So, although the angle iron itself is more than capable of making an effective brace you wil be limited by the holding strength of a few screws. I'd use strips of 3/4" hardwood glued into the corners instead. If you do go with the angle iron, be sure to pre-drill the wood and put some silicone or liquid nails into the holes before inserting the screws. This will ensure that the screws don't back themselves out over time.
    Rick
     
  4. Aaron D

    Aaron D Stunt Coordinator

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    Fred, is it possible for you to weld a piece of metal across the ends? You could drill some holes to allow bolts to go through them and fasten it that way.
    ------------------
    "Once you label me, you negate me." - Soren Kierkegaard
    "Those who see any difference between soul and body have neither." - Oscar Wilde
     
  5. Joseph_D

    Joseph_D Auditioning

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    You can weld the angle iron to pieces of 5" x 5" plate. these plates (on either end of the angle iron) can be mounted to the enclosure. I personally like to use cylindrical piping due to its' strength.
     
  6. Chris Hoppe

    Chris Hoppe Stunt Coordinator

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    Angle iron should work great for bracing a sub!
    The only thing I'd worry about is flexing at the attachment points. To cure that, just glop some epoxy in there!
    One nice thing about angle iron in this application is that it displaces very little volume!
     
  7. Fred Seger

    Fred Seger Stunt Coordinator

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    I would like to use it for cross-bracing, with plates at the ends and as bracing accoss the walls to prevent wall flexing. The pipe is a great idea. I don't mind bolt holes at all, just fill them with silicon caulk or something. I too was thinking of using epoxy in the spaces between the bolts. Just trying to save as much internal space as possible.
     
  8. Joseph_D

    Joseph_D Auditioning

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    Another thought. You can use kitty hair, matting and resin to fiberglass the complete interior of the enclosure. This will displace very little as the thickness only needs to be a 1/16-1/8" and will add considerable strength to the enclosure. It is a great way to fully seal the enclosure as MDF is very pourus.
     

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