haineshisway

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Well, I know for quite certain how popular the Australian Sony BD release of "Oliver!" was because I had to go on a wait-list. The store I ordered it from couldn't get in enough copies to fill the demand.
It's all relative, isn't it? You went to a store that probably ordered ten copies and sold them - seriously. Even if they sold 100 copies and you were on a waiting list, that doesn't make it a popular Blu-ray bought by 5,000 people, does it?
 

classicmovieguy

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Sigh... I think this has gone as far as it needs to, don't you? I simply made one reasonable statement, that I'd wished Fox or one of its retail affiliates would have released "Anastasia", but that I was happy regardless. And I get howled down.

Matt Hough, I deeply apologise that your marvelous review has been derailed in this way. It was never my intention for it to do so.
 

Robin9

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And yet other labels are racing ahead with their classic output. Again, I say (and it's a hopeless wish now) that I'd have preferred "Anastasia" to be via Kino and then watch the sales figures rise. It's too good a movie to be limited to 3,000 copies. If that offends anybody I am deeply sorry.
Yes, other labels are proceeding rapidly with releasing titles. But have you noticed at what price levels? Check the prices on the latest releases from Kino and Olive, and then check the latest boutique label prices in the U. K.
 

Robin9

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Ben Hur, Touch of Evil and countless other classics are available at any Barnes and Noble, etc if you walk into their stores. You know exactly what I'm talking about.
I don't buy Blu-ray discs from stores so I'm out of the loop, but in the past two or three years several posters here at HTF have informed us that their local super stores have massively reduced their stock of Blu-ray discs. I'm sure some of those posters will tell you they don't have a Barnes & Noble near them.

As for "countless other classics" may I remind you that the standard complaint here at HTF is that there aren't countless classics available on Blu-ray disc.
 

Billy Batson

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Well, having not opted to go multi-region, I much prefer it when TT releases an old favourite, it means that I can play it, unlike Kino's region A locked releases, & by the time the disc arrives, the pain of paying a few extra quid has passed.
 

Billy Batson

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I saw this in HD on the telly a couple of years ago, & the scene that sticks in my mind is when they're in a Paris apartment with a huge window that has a panoramic view of Paris. It's not a painted backdrop as there's as train that moves (there's also a night shot where everything is lit up). I thought it was a very clever miniature, but reading that some of it was shot in France, could it be the real thing?

I thought it looked great on the telly, but reading comments here, the Blu-ray looks even better.
 
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Robert Harris

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And yet other labels are racing ahead with their classic output. Again, I say (and it's a hopeless wish now) that I'd have preferred "Anastasia" to be via Kino and then watch the sales figures rise. It's too good a movie to be limited to 3,000 copies. If that offends anybody I am deeply sorry.
I'm apparently missing something.

I've just taken a look at Twilight Time's release of Anastasia, it is not typical catalog fodder, as might be released by other licensees.

There are licensees because the owner of copyright has no belief that the particular title will make a profit.

In the majority of cases, especially for MGM titles, no funds are expended to create new masters, and as far as I'm aware, NO domestic licensees, with the exception of Criterion and Twilight Time, expend any funds regarding upgrade of image or audio quality.

Both work to do what they can to upgrade quality, based upon what has been delivered.

While others will pay a similar amount for the license, that's only the beginning.

There are costs involved for extras -- commentary tracks, the creation and printing of monographs, additional video material, and then, isolated scores, which are of major import to collectors of Twilight Time releases.

3,000 units published, is usually far in excess of the number needed, but is a necessity to achieve a rational production cost.

In those few instances, in which a title sells out, a new contract must be signed, and funds paid for the license to reprint.

I would advise anyone who truly loves catalog titles, to start their own label, negotiate with rights holders, purchase licenses, take delivery, do your initial QC, accept or reject masters, locate and create extra materials, produce, market and distribute the final product, and wait for the cash to roll in.

Want to see your discs sold via Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Deep Discount, Best Buy?

Take your proposed list price, and cut it by at least 50%.

Then calculate your license fee, all internal expenses to cull through studio masters, the upgrade of those masters, the research, costs and production of extras, and see what's left as a potential profit.

Once you've done all of the above, take another financial hit by pressing to BD50s, to hold quality.

Any idea how many catalog titles are compressed, and pressed to BD25s to save costs?

Give it a try, and then you'll know why I hold publishers like Twilight Time in high esteem.

And a final word of advice. Be aware of the reality of your potential audience. Most people will have zero idea who Ingrid Bergman was, and have no interest in purchasing antique films, so when you order your first pressing of 10,000 copies, be prepared with warehouse space.

Lots of it, as inventory piles up.

RAH
 

Douglas R

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I saw this in HD on the telly a couple of years ago, & the scene that sticks in my mind is when they're in a Paris apartment with a huge window that has a panoramic view of Paris. It's not a painted backdrop as there's as train that moves (there's also a night shot where everything is lit up). I thought it was a very clever miniature, but reading that some of it was shot in France, could it be the real thing?

I thought it looked great on the telly, but reading comments here, the Blu-ray looks even better.
The window view of Paris is definitely a backdrop and model train. There is, in fact, very little location shooting.

I thought the UK HD broadcast looked very good as well until I saw the TT release, the picture quality of which is better overall and has more vivid colours.
 

Twilight Time

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I'm apparently missing something.

I've just taken a look at Twilight Time's release of Anastasia, it is not typical catalog fodder, as might be released by other licensees.

There are licensees because the owner of copyright has no belief that the particular title will make a profit.

In the majority of cases, especially for MGM titles, no funds are expended to create new masters, and as far as I'm aware, NO domestic licensees, with the exception of Criterion and Twilight Time, expend any funds regarding upgrade of image or audio quality.

Both work to do what they can to upgrade quality, based upon what has been delivered.

While others will pay a similar amount for the license, that's only the beginning.

There are costs involved for extras -- commentary tracks, the creation and printing of monographs, additional video material, and then, isolated scores, which are of major import to collectors of Twilight Time releases.

3,000 units published, is usually far in excess of the number needed, but is a necessity to achieve a rational production cost.

In those few instances, in which a title sells out, a new contract must be signed, and funds paid for the license to reprint.

I would advise anyone who truly loves catalog titles, to start their own label, negotiate with rights holders, purchase licenses, take delivery, do your initial QC, accept or reject masters, locate and create extra materials, produce, market and distribute the final product, and wait for the cash to roll in.

Want to see your discs sold via Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Deep Discount, Best Buy?

Take your proposed list price, and cut it by at least 50%.

Then calculate your license fee, all internal expenses to cull through studio masters, the upgrade of those masters, the research, costs and production of extras, and see what's left as a potential profit.

Once you've done all of the above, take another financial hit by pressing to BD50s, to hold quality.

Any idea how many catalog titles are compressed, and pressed to BD25s to save costs?

Give it a try, and then you'll know why I hold publishers like Twilight Time in high esteem.

And a final word of advice. Be aware of the reality of your potential audience. Most people will have zero idea who Ingrid Bergman was, and have no interest in purchasing antique films, so when you order your first pressing of 10,000 copies, be prepared with warehouse space.

Lots of it, as inventory piles up.

RAH
Thanks so much, Robert, for the much needed infusion of common sense!
 

Billy Batson

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The window view of Paris is definitely a backdrop and model train. There is, in fact, very little location shooting.

I thought the UK HD broadcast looked very good as well until I saw the TT release, the picture quality of which is better overall and has more vivid colours.
Thanks, that's what I thought at the time. A nice bit of craft there, it must have been a lot more fun working on that than sweating over a computer screen arranging pixels.
 

Robert Crawford

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Thanks so much, Robert, for the much needed infusion of common sense!
Sigh... I think this has gone as far as it needs to, don't you? I simply made one reasonable statement, that I'd wished Fox or one of its retail affiliates would have released "Anastasia", but that I was happy regardless. And I get howled down.

Matt Hough, I deeply apologise that your marvelous review has been derailed in this way. It was never my intention for it to do so.
Can we stop picking on classicmovieguy? Many valid points were made by RAH, Twilight Time and some others about the realities of the marketplace for classic films on Blu-ray. Let's move on please.
 
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haineshisway

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I hope it hasn't come off as picking on anyone - what people have been picking on is the notion that this would somehow have been better served on a different label. And I'm sorry, that kind of thing must be refuted. And Mr. Harris was finally the one who introduced the most salient point: While it's nice to have stuff available via Amazon, Amazon doesn't take 50% they take 60%. So you can imagine what comes back to a label after 60% and it's why the major studios are licensing out their titles, big and small. It's why I stopped selling Kritzerland titles on Amazon and only do so now as a third-party seller, where I charge what I need to and the fees are much less.

In other news, I'm anxiously awaiting my viewing of Anastasia. I have a somewhat long history with Anastasia, having recorded a cast album of the reworked version of Anya, called The Anastasia Affaire, and then finally issuing the original Anya album. It's a grand story and the film is really a great example of what nobody did better than Fox.
 
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classicmovieguy

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I hope it hasn't come off as picking on anyone - what people have been picking on is the notion that this would somehow have been better served on a different label. And I'm sorry, that kind of thing must be refuted. And Mr. Harris was finally the one who introduced the most salient point: While it's nice to have stuff available via Amazon, Amazon doesn't take 50% they take 60%. So you can imagine what comes back to a label after 60% and it's why the major studios are licensing out their titles, big and small. It's why I stopped selling Kritzerland titles on Amazon and only do so now as a third-party seller, where I charge what I need to and the fees are much less.

In other news, I'm anxiously awaiting my viewing of Anastasia. I have a somewhat long history with Anastasia, having recorded a cast album of the reworked version of Anya, called The Anastasia Affaire, and then finally issuing the original Anya album. It's a grand story and the film is really a great example of what nobody did better than Fox.
Yes, I have the Kritzerland album of "Anya" (plus the Bay Cities release of "The Anastasia Affaire") and both are a delight.
 
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Matt Hough

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Yes, I have the Kritzerland album of "Anya" (plus the Bay Cities release of "The Anastasia Affaire") and both are a delight.
I have them both, too. LOVE Anya. I'll never forget Lillian Gish appearing on Mike Douglas (or was it Dick Cavett?) and chiding a theater critic who was on the show as a guest with her about his pan of Anya saying, "We all loved the show so much and didn't want it to close. Shame on you for helping to close it!" I can't remember who the theater critic was who was there. I don't think it was John Simon, but it might have been.
 
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classicmovieguy

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I have them both, too. LOVE Anya. I'll never forget Lillian Gish appearing on Mike Douglas (or was it Dick Cavett?) and chiding a theater critic who was on the show as a guest with her about his pan of Anya saying, "We all loved the show so much and didn't want it to close. Shame on you for helping to close it!" I can't remember who the theater critic was who was there. I don't think it was John Simon, but it might have been.
Good on Lillian for saying that! From the score it deserved a much longer run.
 
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Virgoan

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"Anastasia" is one of three films that mark my earliest memories of movie-going. The other two are "The Ten Commandments" and "War and Peace". I was 7 going on 8, the year was 1956, and I remember being mesmerized by the stories and the scope of the films.

"Anastasia" by Alfred Newman (on LP) was an early soundtrack acquisition and has remained a favorite all these years.

Bergman, Brynner and Hayes are all splendid. Hayes SHOULD have been Oscar-nominated for supporting actress.
 

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