Amperage question

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Joe, Sep 29, 2002.

  1. Joe

    Joe Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2002
    Messages:
    139
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm looking at using this HT setup but am concerned about the amps it draws.

    Rotel RSP-1066 (pre/pro), RMB-1075 (5 channel amp), RB-1080 (2 channel amp), DVD, Tuner, Sub, VCR.

    All together, this setup draws about 16 amps. I only have a 15 amp circut. I imagine though I would only demand 16 amps if the volume was maximized (or at a peak).

    Can someone help explain how all of this would actually work out? Can a 15 amp circut actually take up to 15 amps or is it something less in reality.

    Thanks for your input.
     
  2. Brae

    Brae Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2002
    Messages:
    509
    Likes Received:
    0
    I would be using a 20A breaker if I were you. I would also make sure the wiring supporting your needs is 12AWG and not 14. Maybe you will consider splitting this across two circuits? [​IMG]
     
  3. David Berry

    David Berry Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    May 9, 2002
    Messages:
    150
    Likes Received:
    0
    I would agree. If you have the room on your breaker panel, I would run a dedicated 20 amp circuit. That way, when you have the system up and running you will not have to be concerned about continuously flipping the breaker.
    I am in the middle of running a 20 amp line to my setup. It does not cost a lot of money ($80 Cdn.) and 3-4 hours of time (difficult fishing run).
    Do you know what other loads you have on that circuit?
     
  4. Yogi

    Yogi Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2002
    Messages:
    1,741
    Likes Received:
    0
    I started a thread only a few days ago after observing that one doesn't need a dedicated 20 A circuit under normal conditions.
    http://www.hometheaterforum.com/htfo...nt+consumption
    A single 15 A circuit will suffice for sure in your case. A dedicated 20 A circuit will ofcourse give you additional peace of mind but is not required. When you say that the combined draw in your setup is 16 A. do you mean max draw? At the store, that I am talking about, there was the following equipment, that I can remember, connected to the same output:
    1) B&K Ref 30: max current draw 0.5 A.
    2) Amp Ref 7250II (200W x 5): max current draw 18.5 Amps.
    3) Amp 2220 (220Wx2): Max current draw 7 Amps.
    4) A Pioneer DVD player.
    5) A REL sub: dont know the power draw on this one but must have been a couple of amps max.
    All this was connected thru a Monster power conditioner that had a current draw indicator on it and during loud and I mean really loud action scenes (in the the fairly large theater room) the max draw never went above 12 A even though the combined max draw on all this equipment is close to 30A!
    There are also some members that posted in that thread that had an electrician measure the max draw on their circuits and none of them reported more than 9 amps.
     
  5. David Berry

    David Berry Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    May 9, 2002
    Messages:
    150
    Likes Received:
    0
    Good morning Yogi,

    I did read the thread that you started. Thank you for posting that information - very useful. As you mentioned, even though the ratings on the back of the equipment state a certain wattage or amperage, that does not mean that when you plug that piece in, that is what it is going to draw regardless of how it is being used (unless it is a full Class A amp).
    On a couple of occasions, I flipped my 15 amp breaker due to the fact that I have other loads on that circuit and there was no easy way to split the loads (i.e. plugging in the loads into other outlets wired to a different circuit breaker). This led me to my current situation of wiring a 20 amp dedicated circuit for my AV system, thus removing that load from the original 15 amp circuit.

    Joe, if you truly do not have any other loads on that circuit, there is a strong possibility that you are fine. If not, you will know it because during certain situations you will flip your breaker. At that point, I would strongly recommend a dedicated 15 or 20 amp circuit.
     
  6. Brae

    Brae Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2002
    Messages:
    509
    Likes Received:
    0
    The poster's maximum draw potential is 16A, but he should be sizing his circuit to draw no more than 80% of the circuit's maximum rate, which is 80% of 15A, or 12A. This means he cannot breach more than 12A/16A = 75% of his equipment's capacity.

    Although he may or may not cross that boundary, I would think that preparing for, say, a 77% (of 16A), which is condition of 82% of the 15A rating of his potential 14/2 or 14/3 circuit wiring.

    It is not enough to insure the breaker can handle the maximum load, according to code, but also that the wiring can, too. Additionally, one would be wise to isolate the equipment from AC-motor devices, whether this is at the panel or in-line coming off the circuit in question.
     
  7. Joe

    Joe Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2002
    Messages:
    139
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for the information guys!
     
  8. Kevin. W

    Kevin. W Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 1999
    Messages:
    1,534
    Likes Received:
    0
    David,

    Are you putting in the 20A circuit and doing the wiring yourself? I'm looking to do it just to get me system on its own line. Did you use specialty parts or just the stuff from your local HomeDepot/CT?/etc.

    Kevin
     
  9. David Berry

    David Berry Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    May 9, 2002
    Messages:
    150
    Likes Received:
    0
    Good morning Kevin,

    I am just using parts from the local (Cambridge) Building Box. They are:

    1. 22 meters of 12/2 flexible armoured cable (it is exposed about 5 meters on the outside of a wall - thus armoured). About $1.60 per meter.

    2. One 20 amp slimline Federal Pioneer circuit breaker. About $9.

    3. One 20 amp rated duplex receptacle and a metal box to house it. About $15.

    4. Two clamps (one for where the cable enters the breaker panel and one for where the cable enters the duplex box). About $2.

    5. About 3-4 hours of my time (difficult fishing and I triple check my connections - no rushing here!). Cost: one Sleeman Honey Lager beer.

    I notice that you are from Dundas. Have you ever been in Alternative Audio?
     
  10. Kevin. W

    Kevin. W Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 1999
    Messages:
    1,534
    Likes Received:
    0
     

Share This Page