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Am I Harming My Blu Rays? (1 Viewer)

TJPC

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Many Blu Rays also come with the DVD version of the movie, but some do not. When they do not, I borrow the DVD version and make a copy to be stored in the same case in one of those paper envelopes lined with plastic.
There is quite enough room in the standard Blu Ray case for this so pressure is not a problem, but I wondered about something today. Paper and plastic degrade and turn yellow. Could chemicals be released from these envelopes over the years which could harm the Blu Rays?
 

Alf S

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By the time that would even happen (assuming it even does), odds are you will be streaming the same movies anyway and not even bothering with physical discs.
 

Josh Steinberg

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Some commercial disks I've bought come packaged that way by default - main disc on a hub, bonus disc in a sleeve. It's not something I'd worry about, but I don't have any expert knowledge on the subject one way or the other.
 

jcroy

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I still have a few music cds which came in cardboard sleeves. (There was no plastic cd case). I haven't played these cds in over 15 or 20 years.

When I checked them on the computer recently, they seem to play fine.

I don't know how much more "fragile" dvds and blurays are, compared to music cds.
 

Race Bannon

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I can remember this same sort of question coming up with comic books -- when I was a kid, we were all starting to "bag and board" them, and there was much hand-wringing about what the bags and boards should be made of. After all, there was no way to run a test of what 30 years in a certain kind of bag, with a certain kind of cardboard, would do to a comic book.

As it turns out, it doesn't really matter too much. The really old comic books are made of of newsprint that decays over time if exposed to air. The newer books are made out of paper that doesn't do much no matter what you do. I've got comic books that I personally bought 30 plus years ago, not bagged, and they still look to me like the day I bought them. (They've of course been inside, in a box, temperature controlled).

So I don't think regular cardboard and paper put off much these days in terms of active compounds.
 

TJPC

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Thanks this puts my mind somewhat at rest.
When the ability to burn your own CDs developed, my hobby was to make wave files of my records and burn them to disc. I also scanned the front and back covers of the LPs and made CD booklets.
I couldn't afford acid free paper, so I just used regular office printer paper. I wondered at the time, but even the oldest CDs today seem to be fine, and the booklets haven't even yellowed.
 

jcroy

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I can remember this same sort of question coming up with comic books -- when I was a kid, we were all starting to "bag and board" them, and there was much hand-wringing about what the bags and boards should be made of. After all, there was no way to run a test of what 30 years in a certain kind of bag, with a certain kind of cardboard, would do to a comic book.

As it turns out, it doesn't really matter too much. The really old comic books are made of of newsprint that decays over time if exposed to air. The newer books are made out of paper that doesn't do much no matter what you do. I've got comic books that I personally bought 30 plus years ago, not bagged, and they still look to me like the day I bought them. (They've of course been inside, in a box, temperature controlled).

So I don't think regular cardboard and paper put off much these days in terms of active compounds.

This appears to be the case ^, before I gave away my comic book collection a number of years ago to some younger relatives.

I did the bagging thing for my comic books back in the day, but not really the board thing. The bagged stuff I picked up more than 30+ years ago appeared to have very little to no browning of the paper. Even the early-80s era comics which I didn't bag up and left in the long cardboard boxes for more than two decades, didn't show much if any browning.

I didn't have a temperature controlled room. The comics were just in basements, away from the water pipes and heating/cooling vents. (I didn't live anywhere which had semi-regular flooding problems).
 

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