Alright, its FINALLY done, and finished.

Owen Bartley

Second Unit
Joined
Nov 11, 2002
Messages
487
Yep, I finally completed my Tempest and moved 'er into place. So I found out that the Rustoleum hammered finish is a lot harder to work with than I thought, and it has some definete streaks, but I tried to make them look as much like wood grain as possible and I actually think it looks really cool. If I decided to use this finish again, I would go right to the roll-on and apply it in a grain-looking pattern. One coat, put it on thick, and fast.

There are a few differences between the sides I used different methods on, but overall I'm happy with the way it turned out.

My site is updated with new pics of the ~210L project. Let me know what you think!
 

Adam C.

Stunt Coordinator
Joined
Apr 10, 2002
Messages
113
looks great!!

comparing the hammered to the bedliner I used. the bedliner is not nearly as shiny.
 

Andrew Pratt

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Dec 8, 1998
Messages
3,806
Owen looks good! Is there any way we can convince you to pull those main's out a little from the wall?
 

Ken_R1

Auditioning
Joined
Jan 30, 2003
Messages
4
That is one nice looking subwoofer! Would you provide some more info on the construction of the feet? Me being the newbie that I am cannot quite grasp how you put them together, using the pocket holes and all.
 

Owen Bartley

Second Unit
Joined
Nov 11, 2002
Messages
487
Thanks everyone!

Andrew: they actually have almost a foot of room behind them.

Ken: all I did was cut the tapered pieces from the leftover MDF, and since my father was pretty anxious to try out his new kit we went a bit overboard on the pocket holes. Basically, there are 2 screws sunk inside the smaller one, and they go into the larger piece to make a butt joint, and that makes both sides of the 'foot' the same length. (not the clearest explanation, but if you look at the pics it should be easy to follow...). Then, both halves of the foot have one hole sunk in that allows them to screw into the bottom of the sub (I left a 3/4 inch lip on the bottom). Then, just for extra strength, we glued a little triangular bit in. And I hot-glued the strips of rubber sheet on the bottom for grip. Clear as mud!
 

Ronnie Ferrell

Second Unit
Joined
Jul 16, 2002
Messages
355
Does your dad have the Kreg pocket hole jig? If so did you have to pre-drill a pilot hole in the piece the screw bites into? Kreg tools says you don't have to. I am just wondering if it works that way with MDF.

There is a Woodworking show coming next weekend and I am thinking about getting the Kreg jig.


Ronnie
 

Brian Bunge

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2000
Messages
3,716
Ronnie,

I saw the Kreg jig at the show in Atlanta last year and it was pretty cool. For most uses I'd just as soon use a biscuit joiner. But you'd still need to use clamps with biscuits. Not that that's a problem for you!
 

Owen Bartley

Second Unit
Joined
Nov 11, 2002
Messages
487
Ronnie, I'm not sure if its a Kreg or not, but I'll find out. He did get it at a woodworking show that was in TO a couple weeks ago. And we didn't need to predrill at all, we just used some coarse (I think drywall) screws and it worked like a charm.
 

Forum Sponsors

Forum statistics

Threads
345,226
Messages
4,735,126
Members
141,416
Latest member
Bigbob7777