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"Alot": Something the Internet informed me about.

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Jack Briggs, Aug 17, 2006.

  1. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

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    but isn't it really determined by what precedes the quote?

    "Of all the passengers on the plane, none were wearing life jackets" - It's the word "passengers" (i.e. 'none of the passengers') that determines wether it's singular or plural, thus "wearing life jackets" is ok.
     
  2. Yee-Ming

    Yee-Ming Producer

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    Odd that the article doesn't mention possibly the most famous instance of a trademark gone generic, "aspirin" (originally trademarked by its creator, Bayer AG).
     
  3. Dave Simpson

    Dave Simpson Second Unit

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  4. BrianB

    BrianB Producer

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    So fix it [​IMG] The joys of Wikipedia.
     
  5. BrettGallman

    BrettGallman Screenwriter

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    Yeah, I meant to add that I agree with you that this gets messed up a lot, especially in the media and print. As I've said earlier in this thread, journalism people get to break rules all the time. Just today, I was reading a book we use at school and it recommended leaving out commas when writing for journalism. That drives me nuts.

    Regarding "none:" it's a weird word, considering it operates differently depending on the situation. Sometimes it's quite clear which way to go.

    For example, "None of these books are interesting" is correct.

    However, "None of this food is good" is also correct.

    Basically, just go by the noun found in the prepositional phrase. "Books" is plural, therefore, go with the plural verb; "food" is singular, so go with the singular verb.

    There's always one exception to every rule in English. "None" is one of them, because in other cases, it can be both singular and plural, and sometimes you just have to go by what sounds right. For example, technically both of these are right:

    None of you belongs to this class. or
    None of you belong to this class.

    Generally, however, most people go with the plural form (like the second sentence here). Dave, I would say that the sentence you present in your last post actually makes sense to me, because we know the "none" refers to a number of "passengers."

    Did I mention English is weird? [​IMG]
     
  6. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

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  7. Dave Simpson

    Dave Simpson Second Unit

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    Brett and Mark,

    Whoa guys, consider me illuminated. Other than my twin brother, I can think of no one with whom I could enjoy such a discussion, so thanks for that. Cheers.

    DS.
     
  8. Yee-Ming

    Yee-Ming Producer

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    Ya know, that simply had not occurred to me. I've never contributed ot Wikipedia that way (writing or editing entries), guess it might be time I did.
     
  9. Mike Frezon

    Mike Frezon Moderator
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    As well you should. It was pretty bad. As other have already pointed out, "number" is the subject and the verb should be "compels". Come to think of it, "wide" is a pretty lousy modifier. "Vast" would have been better.

    And, Dave, it should be "those more erudite than me"! [​IMG] And who you callin' "erudite" anyhoo? I ain't no more erudite than the next fella.

    [​IMG]

    This could go on forever! [​IMG]
     
  10. Dave Simpson

    Dave Simpson Second Unit

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    Mike,

    I guess I don't really talk so good [​IMG] Thanks for the correction, sir. Cheers!

    DS.
     
  11. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

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    I didn't want to start a new topic, so here is the best place I could find...

    I just read this and thought it was amusing:
    "Gerald Ford is the oldest living former President." [​IMG]

    I understand why they use the word "former", but it just sounded funny to me when you think about the current President...

    I mean, what would be the point of saying "George W. Bush is the oldest living current President."? Isn't he also the "youngest living current President"? as well as the "ONLY living current President"? [​IMG]
     
  12. Chris Lockwood

    Chris Lockwood Producer

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    > I mean, what would be the point of saying "George W. Bush is the oldest living current President."?

    There would be no point, & I assume nobody said that.
     
  13. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

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    Nobody did, it was just a goofy observation. Kinda like my own version of stand-up. Don't put too much thought into my ramblings because it was just a goof.
     
  14. Bob Turnbull

    Bob Turnbull Supporting Actor

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    You really need to tell us that? [​IMG]

    "Another post by Mark...Aah, eases the pain..."
     
  15. Mike Frezon

    Mike Frezon Moderator
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    Mark: I'll take the Gerald Ford line one step further. Did the writer mean Gerald Ford is the "oldest living current former President"? Or, did the writer mean that Gerald Ford has become the "longest-living former President of all time"? [​IMG]

    Youse guys think this news-writing stuff is easy! [​IMG]

    I would suspect the writer means the former. That is, that Ford is older than the rest of the current crop of former Presidents (Clinton, H.W. Bush, Carter).

    The latter is nearly true. Reagan lived 93 years, 120 days (he was 77 when he left the presidency as our oldest-president-ever). Ford is, today, 93 years, 48 days.
     
  16. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

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    So if he is older than the current president, do you need to say "Former"? Technically he is the oldest living president. Although, while he isn't the current president, can you still call him "President Ford" or do you HAVE to say "Former President Ford"?
     
  17. Holadem

    Holadem Lead Actor

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    No. He is not a president.

    --
    H
     
  18. Mike Frezon

    Mike Frezon Moderator
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    Etiquette and protocol dictate that in a face-to-face meeting he is, indeed, "Mr. President". And I suppose even those close to him might still refer to him as "the president" as in, "is it your turn to go up and bring the president his dinner?" But, writers and journalists--when referring to events current in his life or that occurred after his presidency--would refer to his as "former president" to avoid any confusion with the incumbent.

    For example, if a Michigan paper or radio journalist wrote that "the president was taken to the hospital today" meaning Ford..it could easily be misunderstood by the reader/listener.

    I'm tellin' ya. There's LOTS of rules! [​IMG]
     
  19. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

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    So he's "Mr. President" and not "The President" ; He's not A president, but you can still call him president; and he's "Former President" if you don't use 'Mr.', 'The', or 'A'....

    Ah screw it, he's OLD! Enough said. [​IMG]
     
  20. Mary M S

    Mary M S Screenwriter

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    Dear Sirs,

    Today I come before you in shame.

    Do any remember a scene from The Wind and the Lion when Candice Bergen laughs loudly over Sean Connery’s fall from a horse??
    ..........Until the Berber holding her draws a dagger across her throat?

    I enrolled this afternoon for a couple of classes. A toe’s dip to determine if I am suited to continue my education, after many moons away, in prep for a second career.

    All my mock in this and similar threads now sends shudders of cold trickling down my spine, why did I practically delight in constant and casual disregard towards this most fundamental accomplishment?!
    Currently overwhelmed by a sensation of contrite submission to ye resident Lords of Communication.

    I humbly apologize, (particularly to Monsieur Briggs) feel free to ‘correct’ me - any time.

    No – longer – a – scoffer
    -a-lot.

    Sincerely,
    Your Nit Wit
     

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