all washed up !!

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Dave Cukina, Feb 7, 2002.

  1. Dave Cukina

    Dave Cukina Stunt Coordinator

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    I'm not to sure where this would be best suited so Im posting in here. I have a major home theatre catastrophe, my basement flooded last night about 4 inches but some places are deeper than others. Some of my equipment got wet and I was wondering what is the best method of drying electronics any and all help would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks
    Dave
    p.s. On the brighter side of things my 50h81 is dry as a whistle. [​IMG]
     
  2. Tim Abbott

    Tim Abbott Second Unit

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    Sorry to hear that Dave. I don't have any useful advice, but I understand where you are coming from. My apartment flooded about a year ago with about 3 inches of sewage. Fortunately, the only home theater things affected were speaker stands and my tv stand, and I managed to salvage those.

    I still remember what it felt like when the realization hit. It took about a minute of checking, but once I found out everything was ok, my heart slowed down a little.

    I hope everything works out for you.
     
  3. Legairre

    Legairre Supporting Actor

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    A guy here at work told me a story a couple of weeks ago about an old radio he had in basement. Apparently he was renting an old house and the basement was flooded when they got home due to a broken pipe in the winter. They had an old radio that was in four feet of water. He took the cover off the radio, dried it out with fans and it work fine after that. Not sure if it will work, but it did for him. Also this was a story at work so it may be just a story.
     
  4. Dave Cukina

    Dave Cukina Stunt Coordinator

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    thanks guys, right now I"m bringing everything out of the basement because I need to pull up the carpet so the equipment has to wait until I get rid of all the water. The insurance company sent over cleaners to help so it makes me feel a little better.
     
  5. Jason Wolters

    Jason Wolters Stunt Coordinator

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    My advice would be to get everything to a dry location. Let it dry for a day or two. after this, I would pop the covers off of everyting and check for any water. Even if I didn't see water I would take some compressed air (preferably the canned air) and blow the heck out of everything. Don't worry if you see frost on your components after you blow, this will evaporate quickly.

    After doing this I would put it all back together and then in a day or so go plug it all in and give it a test. I have worked in electronics for years, and this is my advice. Also, DO NOT plug any of this stuff in until you are positive that EVERYTHING is dry. Most likely if no damage was done while it was plugged in than you will be fine.
     
  6. Dave Cukina

    Dave Cukina Stunt Coordinator

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    I'm moving to the sun room so it should be okay to dry there, the insurance adjuster is on his way over so I'm thinking that the equipment will get replaced. I've never done a claim before so are there things that I should watch out for when talking to him?

    Dave
     
  7. ThomasL

    ThomasL Supporting Actor

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    Whatever you do Dave, don't plug anything in until you have absolutely concluded it's as dry as it'll get. [​IMG] Electricity is what fries electronics when it is wet - in most cases. In addition, even things that were not sitting in water should be allowed to dry. The air in your basement will become pretty humid and this can affect things that appear dry. I had an old tv that didn't take kindly to the moisture level in my basement during a springtime flood. It eventually came back to life but I was lucky. I also have an unfinished basement and keep everything off the floor. A sump pump and some portable "floor suckers" also help to keep the water at bay [​IMG]
    good luck,
    --tom
     
  8. Dave Cukina

    Dave Cukina Stunt Coordinator

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    You know as angry as I am it's nice to know that I can come out here and ask for advice and in just a few minutes you guys started to help me out. I think that's what sets HTF apart from all the rest. What a classy bunch of people.[​IMG]
    Thanks
    Dave
     
  9. Bruce N

    Bruce N Second Unit

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    I would strongly recommend AGAINST using compressed or canned air to blow away the water. It seems like a good idea but what can wind up happening is you can drive the moisture inside components that are not sealed and cause way more damage than was there originally.

    It's best to just WAIT and let things dry naturally.

    My $.02

    Bruce
     
  10. JimHal

    JimHal Stunt Coordinator

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    My Dad knows a repairman who got a TV from and older lady because it didn't work.

    The tv was full of straw and dirt from mice. He took the case off it and went to the car wash. Sprayed the thing out and let is sit and dry for a few weeks.

    I don't know if he did any work on it after but it works fine now.

    Just thought I'd add that. And like a previous post said, just let your stuff sit and dry naturally.
     

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