Advice Needed - Buying a new Car

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Moe Maishlish, May 8, 2003.

  1. Moe Maishlish

    Moe Maishlish Supporting Actor

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    Hey all...

    I'm about to plunk some hard-earned money down onto a brand new car, and was wondering if anyone out there could give me some advice regarding negotiating tactics, and any other issues related to the purchase.

    A little background - my 1994 Honda Civic Si is getting on in years, and I was forced to spend about $2600 in the past year on repairs (radiator, timing belt, muffler, exhaust, water pump, new tires, alternator, battery, bearings, boot, etc. The A/C died on me last summer, and I didn't replace it.). The car has approx. 240,000 km's, and I think it's time to retire her.

    I intend to sell my car privately instead of using it as a tradein. I'll invariably receive more money for it as a sale than any dealer would give me against the purchase of a new vehicle. But selling the old car is a topic for a whole other thread (don't worry, I'll be starting one of those in good time! [​IMG] ).

    I pretty much have my heart set on the 2003 Hyundai Tiburon GT (yes, I know it's a Hyundai, but it's gotten pretty amazing reviews!), which lists for about $25,795 Canadian. But there's no way I'm paying MSRP for the car, and like anyone, I'd like to get the best possible price for the car. I'll be financing it (I don't like leasing), at 3.9% over a 60 month term.

    I should have enough for a down payment by this weekend. I intended to walk into the dealership chequebook in hand, and let the dealer know that I intend to buy a car "today", so long as he were to give it to me for a price I can be happy with. I want them to know that I'm serious, and not just some guy that's there to waste their time. I'm not interested in making friends, and I'm sure that the dealer isn't either.

    I'm well aware of dealer tactics, such as:

    a) "Oh, we can't negotiate past blah blah blah"
    b) "This is a special that ends today blah blah blah"
    c) "This is the last one on the lot blah blah blah"
    d) Leaving you to wait for half an hour while they go to "talk" to their "manager" (they're really having a smoke in the back)

    Considering the price of the car, I was thinking of starting at $23,000. The thing is, I don't know if I should even throw out the first number! Is this a good idea? How should I approach this? This is basically where I need help. I know about dealer invoice (what the dealer pays for the car), but I'm not sure what the actual invoice is. Obviously, they won't sell the vehicle at a loss (or will they?), so the sale should be something a little higher than their purchase price.

    There are several dealerships in the Toronto area, so if a price can't be agreed upon, I fully intend on getting up, thanking the dealer for this time, handing them my business card with my cellular number written on the back, and leaving. I'll be sure to tell him I'm on my way to another dealership. I figure that's a good strategy to let them know that someone else will probably get the sale instead of them, which might motivate them to try a little harder.

    So can anyone here offer me some new-car buying advice? Any would be greatly appreciated!

    Moe.
     
  2. Shane Martin

    Shane Martin Producer

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    Moe,
    Go to Edmunds and it should tell you the invoice price of your car that you want with the correct options. Go with Invoice + Delivery which is what alot of dealers in my area will deal in and you should be maybe under that figure you want easily.
    http://www.edmunds.com/new/2003/hyun... e..1.Hyundai*

    Granted these are US prices but they should put you in the ballpark of where you should pay.

    Be prepared to walk out though. Once you walk out, a dealer will most likely if they are desperate enough call you after the deal and try to get you to come in. Make them in writing tell you they will come to your terms because vocal word isn't worth a flip nowadays(email or fax is good).

    If they don't then keep at them and within a matter of time if this the car you want, they will sell it to you.
     
  3. Keith Mickunas

    Keith Mickunas Cinematographer

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    If you can get the Canadian info available at kbb.com and Edmunds, take that with you. Then they'll know that you know what the car is worth. Edmunds has the true market value which is an indicator of the average price paid for the car in your market. That's pretty helpful.

    Sometimes a dealership will be up front with you and offer a legitimate price without much trouble. Mostly you have to argue. Tell them that you don't need the car, you just want it, and if it can't be bought for what you are willing to pay then you are just going to wait until you have more money. Go to multiple dealerships if necessary. Also, find the internet or fleet sales manager. Those guys tend to provide better prices quicker.

    If you can go in there and say "I want this car with these options in this color for $X" you'll have a better chance of getting a good deal. So unless they are wasting your time, don't start off wasting their's. Initially treat them with respect and show them you have knowledge of the car and your decision is made and it will go better for you.
     
  4. Tim Morton

    Tim Morton Stunt Coordinator

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    I would suggest you walk in and let them know up front that you are looking for the best deal they can give you on the car you want. If that deal is not what you want to pay then walk away, if it is then buy the car. All the rest of that stuff you posted in your topic should be left home.
     
  5. Chris Moe

    Chris Moe Screenwriter

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  6. Eric_L

    Eric_L Screenwriter

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    This worked for me after my last car was totaled.

    "My car is dead. I need to drive for work so I need a car by Monday. The last salesman tried playing games with me, and now he is alone. I like the Concorde. What is the best, no bullshit ticket you can give me?"

    I was actually 100% serious and honest. A guy at another Chrysler dealer tried selling me a concorder lxi for $30,000 with an aftermarket sunroof for a bit more. That is a joke.

    The guy I said this to (mostly out of exasperation) gave me a Concorde Pro-AM (way better than the LXI -sunroof standard) for $25,000.

    Of course, I went in well informed about the price/value of the car, so I could recognize a good deal when I saw it. I got all my info from yahoo auto. I think the salesman just appreciated my no-bullshit approach. he knew I was informed of the value, was ready to buy, and was not going to play BS games with him (or be played with)
     
  7. Andrej Dolenc

    Andrej Dolenc Stunt Coordinator

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    Read up on edmunds.com about dealer tactics and such as well. The site is a huge tome of automotive knowledge.

    Andrej
     
  8. KyleS

    KyleS Screenwriter

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  9. Moe Maishlish

    Moe Maishlish Supporting Actor

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    Ok, I've read up on several of the sites you've all mentioned, and have learned a thing or two (or fifty) about barganing & negotiating tactics. Thank for everyone's input so far! Keep it coming!!!

    There are a couple of websites out there that offer Canadian Invoice information, but they charge a fee to disclose it (http://www.carcostcanada.com & http://www.freeinvoiceprices.com). Still, if I really want to find out what the real invoice price is, I can pay the minimal fee ($24 + tax) and work from there.

    I'm still not quite sure EXACTLY how I'm going to approach this situation though. I plan on walking in and telling the salesperson that I intend to buy the car as soon as possible, and that I'd like to negotiate the price. I don't want to be the first one to mention a price of course, but if I have to I'll start somewhere below/around invoice and work from there. If I don't like the situation, I'll just leave and go elsewhere. Once I get the quote, I'll have the salesperson put it in writing, and I'll check with another dealership to see if they can beat the price.

    From reading the tips on the resources mentioned above, I'm aware of some of the post-sale scams that dealers try and pull (additional fees, warranty costs, financing scams, etc), so I'll be sure to look out for those.

    Anyone else have any other suggestions? Is there anything else I should keep a look out for?

    Thanks again!!

    Moe.
     
  10. Chris Moe

    Chris Moe Screenwriter

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    This is how it went when I bought my car. I had lots of print outs and my research with me and the salesman obviously knew that I had done my homework. When we sat down to negotiate price I asked him what his best offer was. He came back and offered me MSRP, I just said I will give you $500 over invoice. He came back with $1,000 over invoice. I offered $500 over invoice again. He went to go talk to his manager. When he came back he offered $750 over invoice with 0% interest for four years. I took it.

    The whole thing took maybe 15 minutes.

    Do your homework before you go in and bring some research with you so that you can use it if you need to. It will also show the dealer that you are an informed customer. I found the whole process really easy and very painless (it was my first time buying a new car).
     
  11. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    personally I would find the invoice price for the car you want. Never let the salesmen know which you prefer, don't let him know you have your heart set on the white one, I like to be as indifferent as possible (it probably doesn't help, but it sure pisses them off and makes me giggle)

    start at invoice and work up, honestly I don't think the tiburon is a terribly hot seller, as it's not all new for this year, not that there's anything wrong with the car, but trying to get a deal on something like a WRX STi that they can't keep on the lot is a different matter. I would not pay anything over 2% above invoice, but that's just me. If you can get a leftover 2003, even better. Maybe 1000 (cdn dollars) below invoice is reasonable, start there. If they aren't willing to deal, leave.
     
  12. Jason Merrick

    Jason Merrick Supporting Actor

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    Moe,

    I realize this is a little late, but if you haven't purchased already this may help. It will only work if you have multiple dealers within your acceptable driving distance. Figure out the invoice price and what other people are paying (check the tiburon forums on the internet) for the same car in your area. After having a reasonable idea of what you want to pay, fire off an e-mail to all of the dealers in your area with that price and tell them you are ready to purchase immediately upon their acceptance. If you receive multiple offers from different dealers, then you can play one off the other until you get to the rock-bottom price.

    As long as you are reasonable in your desired price, you should get results. Don't send out an offer for $2000 under invoice or they will just laugh at you instead of seriously attempt to make a deal. One benefit of this approach is taking out the middle-man (front line salesperson) so you don't have to deal with all the games they try to play or the hard-sell tactics.

    Good luck!
     

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