Acoustic Room Treatments?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Ryan Peddle, Feb 6, 2001.

  1. Ryan Peddle

    Ryan Peddle Second Unit

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    I have finished my upgrades for the next few months and now would like to look into improving the sound of my room.
    Right now I have very flat probably sound reflective pannel walls.
    In most of the listening area you can hear and echo in the room (of you own voice).
    One thing I always notice when going to a good listening room, there is one at the dealer I go to, is that the sound is more accurate.
    I do not want to tear anyting down, but was wondering what I can add to help out the sound be more "pure" in my room.
    any suggestions,
    Ryan Peddle
    ------------------
    Oops...I dropped my eardrums
    could you pick them up for
    me
     
  2. Phil A

    Phil A Producer

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  3. Lee Whitman

    Lee Whitman Auditioning

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    Ryan
    I just recently finished fine tuning my dedicated room. First I used RPG's room optomizer software to identify speaker location and wall reflection points. The software is excellent as just re-locating the speakers as per the program made quite a difference. For the reflection points on the side walls I built some low cost frames using mdf boards and crown moudling and made 3" thick panels up with a product called "drain board", which is compressed rock wool (they use on the outside of foundations in new home construction). I cover the panels in a acoustic fabric and even mixed in some movie posters in between the panels, the posters are enhanced with that rope light around them turn out pretty cool. It did appear to make quite the diference in the room as I had to re-vist my speakers levels and raise them up. I got real crazy and actually built a large diffusor for the back wall by machining wood blocks(all different sizes) from pine and placed them on their ends it also caused me to re-adjust all the speaker levels. It was a lot of work but I think the results are worth it. If your room is not dedicated you may have a difficult time doing thinks as most wives don't appreciate this kind of decorating.
     
  4. Stan Marcewicz

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    Jon is off the deep end on wires and the like but the DIY room acoustic stuff is sound. He once sent me some magic Risch wire interconnects. I did a lengthy comparison with RS gold tips. I though they might sound better if I knew for sure they were being used but blind tests came up random.
    http://members.xoom.com/Jon_Risch
    Stan
     
  5. Ron-P

    Ron-P Producer

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    Ryan,
    I raided the projector room of an IMAX Theater and pulled off the sound panels before the wrecking ball hit. This stuff is basically 1" thick insulation. It looks very similar to the hard panel insulation you can pick up at any home improvement warehouse. I found the early reflection points, cut the panels to the size I needed, wrapped them with some black felt and hung them on the walls.
    For the back wall, I bought some black medium density drapes from a local home store and used a 1" wood dowel to hang them. I hung them across the entire back wall.
    I cannot tell you enough the tremendous improvement these simple tweaks had on my sound system. It was literally like having an entirely new sound system.
    I had problems with reflections, echoes, mains overpowering the surrounds, I had little direction from the front sound stage. The panels and drapes solved all those problems.
    Check out my website and you can see what I did.
    Peace Out~ [​IMG]
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    [​IMG] The Green Room
     
  6. Ryan Peddle

    Ryan Peddle Second Unit

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    What type of equipment/program do you need to find out where the echos and "bad sounding" spots are. I mean I know there is a pretty bad echo and the fact that the room has just crappy wall panels from Home Depot, I know it is not the best for sound. I don't really have the authority (it's my parents house) or the resources to completely do over the room again, but I thought of using some carpet or thick curtains to cover the walls to dampen out the relection.
    Your thoughts?
    Ryan P
    ------------------
    Oops...I dropped my eardrums
    could you pick them up for
    me
     
  7. Steve U

    Steve U Extra

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    I was hoping to hear some thoughts on the "carpet" I've seen on HT walls. Can simple Home Depot basic carpet suffice? I'm halfway through construction, and I'm going to end up with sheetrock walls, thick slightly-textured paint, and two raised columns on each wall to minimize reflection, but if thin carpet is the way to go, now would be the time to know...
     
  8. Phil A

    Phil A Producer

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    If you have slap echo from things bouncing off hard surfaces back and forth then you may want to consider some treatment such as Sonex or whatever brand you prefer. Sonex Jr. is a 2 ft. by 2 Ft. foam sheet about 2 inches thick that can be hung on a wall and I think is about $80 for a set of 4 and they come in colors. If you can put bookcases in the room and fill them with books that would help too. Carpeting will help a little as well.
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  9. Thomas Ward

    Thomas Ward Auditioning

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    Greetings Ryan and members of the list.
    (My first post... I'm a tad nervous)
    Please take a moment and check out this link...
    http://www.headphone.com/EditorialHe.../RoomTubes.asp
    I have never bought any of their products, but they sure have a great website!
    Any how...We just converted a 12'x12'x8' "room from acoustic hell" into a home theater. We discovered that the 48 Hz (1,0,0 and 0,1,0 modes) resonances would "rip your head off"! After some reading it became apparent that simple absorption techniques would not provide sufficient attenuation below 200 Hz.
    Well...It was AMAZING how you can cancel the room resonances using 12" and 16" sonotubes cut to proper lengths. You can wave these "giant toilet paper tubes" around (in and out of the nodes) and observe a 10db swing on your Radio Shack sound level meter (SPL)! You'll also need a function generator (mine is a $9.95 DIY from the local electronics shop). Just mount your SPL on a tripod and position where your head would be while listening. Sweep your oscillator to find the peaks. Refer to the HeadRoom website for specifics regarding modes and nodes. Get some sonotubes and trim to proper lengths, and tune your room! Move your subwoofer(s) around too! We were able to achieve a fairly flat room response below 200Hz with only four traps. We are thinking about adding traps for the 0,0,1 mode, but it is not significant according to our measurements so far.
    For attenuation above 200Hz, we have added three BIG homemade absorption panels along the walls, one on each side, and one behind the listener's seats. The panels are two layers of R13 with the kraft paper "back to back" in a 4'x7.5' frame made of 1"x6" pine boards. The fiberglass is covered with poly batting and finished with flame retardant burlap. The panels are VERY effective (probably adding well over 100 total Sabins above 200Hz). Clapping hands or talking in the room gives the aural impression of being outside, rather than in a tiny room (echo chamber). The stereo imaging improved dramatically when the panels were placed in the room...You get that "wearing headphones" sensation. Pretty cool.
    Also, "The Master Handbook of Acoustics" TAB Books, has lots of cool info.
    Cheers!
    ------------------
    Ya know that "burned resitor" smell?!
     
  10. GaryM

    GaryM Agent

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    The most effective treatment for my living room turned out to be five sections of bookcases and about 2 tons of books. We had the books all over the house and stored in boxes in the attic - now they have absolutely killed reflections from the rear of the theater room (aka the living room). It seems to be a combination of the weight (books and hardwood bookcases) and the random nooks and crannies that trap the sound.
    Best part was - the wife wanted them in the room - or at least out of the other rooms - and I compromised. Then it sounded lots better - I was surprised. Total cost was less than $800, we got five 7X3 foot cherry bookcases on sale at Sears - the dark cherry also absorbs light rather than reflecting it. Best part - it was the furniture budget, not the home theater budget.
    Gary
     

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