Acceptable proximity of speakers to wood stove?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Scott Stephens, Nov 28, 2001.

  1. Scott Stephens

    Scott Stephens Stunt Coordinator

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    I've got a pair of Paradigm Monitor 7's, and unfortunately, they are required to be placed around 2 feet from my wood stove (whose temperatures generally reach around 400 degrees Farenheit). I've monitored the speakers closely when the stove gets a-cookin', and the cabinets don't seem to be getting excessively hot.

    But, as all HTF-philes probably would be, I'm a bit paranoid about heat damage to my speakers. If anyone has any info on this, please let me know your thoughts. I'll continue to keep an eye and a hand on my speakers. Thanks...
     
  2. Jon_B

    Jon_B Screenwriter

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    Wow, another MT member. As you know a wood stove puts out quite a bit of heat. If it was my home theater I wouldn't have it in the same room as the wood stove. But if you can't avoid it, put it as far away as possible.

    Jon
     
  3. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

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    [​IMG]
    Those are some nice looking speakers. I would agree with avoiding the stove if at all possible. 2 feet is pretty close.
    If it is unavoidable, I would measure the temperature inside and out (snake a thermometer in the port) while the stove has been operating for a while. Then, I might call Paradigm and ask them what the recommended operating temperatures might be. And hope you are within that limit. If not, you should look into putting something in between the stove and the speaker as a shield. (perhaps you could call nasa and they could spot you some extra aerogel. [​IMG])
    Another thing to consider: even if the heat is within reason... you should also watch out that your enclosures don't get dried out. I would hate to see that finish start to peel over time. Or worse, the enclosure itself start to warp due to the dry heat from the stove.
     
  4. Chad Isaacs

    Chad Isaacs Supporting Actor

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    I somewhat think you are ok..I say this only because growing up,we had a wood burning stove in the living room.It was in the corner of the room so one side and the back of the stove was probably within a foot of the wall.The walls were paneling and they never suffered at all.
     
  5. SteveMc

    SteveMc Stunt Coordinator

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    Most wood stoves I have seen were on bricks and probably for good reason. The heat won't affect the electronics much, but the wood may suffer over long periods of heating/cooling repeatedly. Keep it as far away as you can, but i wouldn't expect much to happen until years down the road.
     
  6. Mac F

    Mac F Agent

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    I agree with everyone else, keep them as far away as possible- great advice in a perfect world. If you have to live with compromise like the rest of us, 2 ft may be as far as possible.
    To prevent drying of wood, wipe it regularly with real lemon oil, Homer Formby is one brand. Oil with silicone will help the shine, but doesn't add any moisture resistance. Fireplaces or wood stoves remove a lot of moisture from an entire room, just notice how much static electricity you have.
    For heat protection, try draping a sheet of aluminum foil over the near side of the speaker (shiney side toward the stove). As an experiment, put a thermomitor on one side of the foil and then the other to see if it lowers the temperature enough to bother with. This is guaranteed to look strange to your visitors, but might prolong the life of the wood.
    [​IMG]
     
  7. John-Miles

    John-Miles Screenwriter

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    I would do everything possible to keep your speakers at room temperature. While i do agree this heat should not do too much damage, as long as it is within reason as you have said the ehat WILL effect your speakers and i would guess their performance.

    since i dont personally have any experience with using speakers at varying temperatures it is reasonable to infer that as the indivudal components would each be affected by heat so too would the speaker as a whole.

    (if you dont want to listen to a good natured and theoretcal rant here , its theoretical because ive never done, nor have i read of expiriments on this... but it would be interesting, then kindly skip this post)

    first of all I am going to draw your attention to an old saying "Its cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey" I dont know how many of you know what this means as you most seem to be very intelligent people id say alot of you do, but if you are like me, until someone explained this i thought it was some obsecure and weird crude sexual reference. in fact it refers to a time on ships when cannons were still in use. typically cannon balls (made of lead or iron i believe) would be kept on a rack made of brass that was in essence two parallel bars, this rack was called a brass monkey. what would commonly happen at sea when the temperatures dropped low enough the cannon balls which have a different rate of thermal contraction then the brass bars would get small enough to slip through the brass rack. thus freeze the balls off a brass monkey.

    now when metals get hot they will expand, so depending on how exactly your speakers are made, and exactly what they are made of (which i truly have no idea the answer to) then the connection if made of different metals may begin to work loose over time, as well depending on the metals and alloys themselves it is remotely possible (I really dont think so but i dont have my metalurgy book handy to check) but depending on the temperatures soem alloys when exposed to an elevated temperature will change their structure and properties in varying ways. (I am 99% sure this wont be an issue for you, but why not mention it)

    anothr issue to consider mightbe the electrical resitivity of your wiring WILL change with an increase or decrease in temperature, what if any effect this might have on sound i cant tell you, but for those reasons id keep your speakers at room temperature the way they were designed to work.

    Cheers

    John
     
  8. Mac F

    Mac F Agent

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    John,
    Thanks for the history behind the expression. I had heard the expression years ago and just took it at face value, similar to "colder than a well digger's a**". You can learn all sorts of good info here.[​IMG]
     
  9. Scott Stephens

    Scott Stephens Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks everyone for all the advice. Again, I must state that there really is no other option of location for the speakers, so my hands are tied.

    But, something someone else suggested is this: place a small plastic fan on the floor behind the speakers and run it whenever the wood stove is burning. This will serve 2 purposes:

    1.) Most importantly, it will help keep excessive heat off the speakers (I tried it, and it seems to work...the speakers seem to be at or closer to room temperature).

    2.) And, perhaps more theoretically, the proximity of the fan to the wood stove will act like an indicator for excessive heat. Since the fan is plastic and closer to the stove than the speakers, if any heat damage occurs to the fan then one can expect the speakers might suffer as well.

    I have tried this method for the past 4 days and it seems to be helping quite a bit, though long term effects will obviously not be able to be measured. I'll also take the advice of the lemon oil to prevent drying (I'm also using a humidifier in the room as well). Also, if anyone has any tips on something to use as insulation for the speaker wires, please let me know.

    I'm awaiting response from Paradigm on this matter, so if they have any interesting info I'll be sure to post it here.

    Thanks again.
     

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