acceptable low freq level for front speakers?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Mark LP, Jan 12, 2003.

  1. Mark LP

    Mark LP Agent

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    Is there a general consensus on the lowest frequency that a pair of front speakers used for two channel and HT should generate? I'm wondering this because I noticed that the new reference line of Kef speakers seem to be in the 55hz range for the mid-line version. The two highest get you lower.50hz and 45hz. Comments?
     
  2. Mark LP

    Mark LP Agent

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    no thoughts?
     
  3. Jose G

    Jose G Supporting Actor

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    For two ch. stereo with no sub- you want to have mains that go as low as possible- the lower they go, generally the more you pay for them and the more you hear from them- we hope. For HT, you want to set all speakers to small, again generally, and let the sub take care of the lows. It's best to let the receiver handle the crossover for you and set the sub above the receiver's crossover. If your mains can go down clean to 50Hz, you want a sub that can go down to at least 25Hz clean (but lower is better)- I believe two octaves below the mains here would suffice taking you down to about 12Hz- now that's a sub! The point is with a good sub- the lows are not as much of an issue- a good sub will handle that, and without a sub, the lows are a bigger issue for HT, less so for music but still an issue, because there is music that can produce bass down to the 25Hz range, just not a lot of it that goes that low, unless you listen to a lot of eletronic and pipe organ music. Anyway- get sub, will help. Speakers that can truly go down to 20Hz cost a pretty penny and still sometimes struggle at those lower Hz. I would say get mains that go down to at least the 50Hz area and the center to about 70Hz (80 is ok, but the low cut off shouldn't be more than this).
     
  4. Mark LP

    Mark LP Agent

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    Thanks Jose,

    My current fronts are Kef reference 2~2's. They go down to about 45hz. My rears are Kef RDM two's that go to about 75hz, matching center channel. My sub is velodyne fsr-12.

    I'vd enjoy the 2~2's for my fronts immensely. I'm probably going to be changing them out here soon though. I didnt want to comprise by getting speakers that weren't reaching quite as far. I do enjoy two channel music as much as 5.1 channel.

    Would you hold to the same 50-55hz range for good two channel music listening? For what its worth the new kef reference plays up to 55khz. I asked why they now go above audible listening frequencies, they responded that the above 20khz can combine with other frequencies to produce audible music. There by adding previously unheard tones. Sound right?

    Mark
     
  5. Mike_Ch

    Mike_Ch Stunt Coordinator

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    Mark,

    Your Kef Reference 2.2's are bandpass designs, so they sacrifice bass extension for higher output. One of the first things I learnt when I got into this hobby was, at least for stereo speakers, not to rely on specs, but to listen. A lot of the FR results provided by manufacturers are BS, and do not relate to how they will sound in a room. I haven't heard the new so-called "super-tweeters" from companies like KEF or Tannoy, but I do know that the Uni-Q driver and other coaxial drivers have limited upper frequency extension, so augmenting this with a dedicated driver that extends to ultrasonic frequencies can only be a good thing.

    Lower frequency extension in a pair of speakers will cost more money, for larger diameter (and more heavily built) drivers, bigger cabinets for more volume, and more extensive bracing to reduce extra cabinet resonances. I am betting however, when you actually listen to the new KEF reference line, the 5Hz difference will seem a lot more than what it looks on paper.

    Cheers,
    Mike
     
  6. Jose G

    Jose G Supporting Actor

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    My comments were posted in more general terms only. Mike knows more about the KEF speakers than I do, and I would agree with him on the let your ears be the judge part of his post and on the reason that lower extension speakers will cost more. Since you have a sub- I wouldn't worry much about the lows and focus on the highs- looking for clean, crisp, well imaged, well balanced sound, especially between the mids and the highs. I would audition any speakers with a variety of music but would concentrate on using vocal tracks to check for accurate sound reproduction in these areas.
     

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