AC Outlet/Hardwiring Question(s)

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by DaleI, Jan 17, 2002.

  1. DaleI

    DaleI Stunt Coordinator

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    My room has nothing but AC outlets, but would like to use One item that is better suited for hardwiring. Is it possible to get an electrician to hardwire in this room? Can it be done just at one location on the wall of my choosing or must it be near an outlet. Is it expensive?

    The item I need it for is a backlit Poster Marquee; I don't want an AC cord to be visable; I was told hardwiring was the way to go.
     
  2. Mike LS

    Mike LS Supporting Actor

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    It might be difficult to find an electrician that would come out for such a small job, but I'd make some calls.

    Your best bet for the marquee is to have it wired to a regular light switch, which can be put in an unobtrusive place pretty much anywhere in your room.

    Should be an easy job.
     
  3. ace peterson

    ace peterson Second Unit

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    Why would hardwiring be the way to go? Are you using something special? Wouldn't it be better to simplify your project if you could? If you did hardwire, would you wire in a switch or would it be lit 24/7?
     
  4. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    I thought he was pretty clear as to why he wanted to hardwire, Ace:
     
  5. DaleI

    DaleI Stunt Coordinator

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    Exactly. With home theaters, ultimately, you want to duplicate a theater as much as possible. So you wouldn't want AC cords visable if you can help it. A switch on the wall could turn it on or off--depending on placement and how much you want to pay an electrician.
     
  6. ace peterson

    ace peterson Second Unit

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    Nod, I wasn't totally sure what you meant by that when I first read it. It would be pretty cheap if you could do it yourself, but they are right. I think it would be a challenge to find an electrician to come out for such a small job. But I bet they could do it fairly cheap for you. They charge by the hour right? The closer to the outlets you put the box, the easier the job will be. Each stud further away you go, that's just one more hole in the wall to patch afterwards. The ideal thing would be to put the box directly above the outlet. Then he'd just have to run the wire straight up.
     
  7. MarkMaestas

    MarkMaestas Agent

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    This is usually an easy job, but the difficulty will be based on you specific home. If there is an easy way to run the wires, and there is an available hot line to tap into nearby, then it should be easy. Your profile doesn't say what area you are in, but you shouldn't have any trouble finding an electrician to do the job. Call a few. With a description, some will probably be able to give you a ballpark idea of what it will cost. There should be others that will give free estimates. In my area, it would cost about $75-$200 depending on if you wanted it hooked to a light switch and the difficulty involved in running the wire.

    One other consideration...Flexibility...How long do you plan on staying in the house? Will this detract from the sale of the home? Will you always want the poster in that location? There are covers that can somewhat hide power cords. They are available at lighting supply stores. Paint it the color of your wall and it blends easily. Just a suggestion if you want more flexibility or if the electrician proves to be more expensive that it's worth.

    Good Luck

    Mark
     
  8. Don Foley

    Don Foley Auditioning

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    Here's a suggestion. Of course, keep in mind that if you don't have the ability to run a wire in your house, you may not have the ability to do this, but...

    ...make a battery powered light box. I would even take it one step farther and suggest a rechargable-battery powered lightbox.

    A little lumber, black paint, acrylic glass, perhaps some frosted acrylic to diffuse the light, a string of battery-powered christmas lights (Michael's craft store sells them) and bingo. Of course having a miter saw, drill and a router around would help a great deal.

    Hmm. Be right back, think I'll go build one.

    df

    ps. running a wire is easy, it's patching the drywall back that's a pain. on the other hand, this is a good project to learn the fundamentals of home repair. think of it as an opportunity.
     
  9. Mac F

    Mac F Agent

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    You may already be aware of this, there is a compromise between a standard socket and hardwiring. It is called a 'clock receptical'. It has a single socket like a standard 120 v outlet, but it is recessed about an inch into the outlet box. the idea is a place to plug in an electric clock and conceal the plug, the clock hangs over the outlet to completely hide it. The outlet can be controlled with a switch if you like, but if your display has it's own switch, that is all you need. This would simplify adding an outlet just above an existing outlet: all you would have to do is make a small hole in the wall for an outlet box, and drop the wire. There would be no repair to the sheetrock required.

    These sockets are also used to hide plugs for lighting over paintings.
     

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