1. Sign-up to become a member, and most of the ads you see will disappear. It only takes 30 seconds to sign up, so join the discussion today!
    Dismiss Notice

A Quiet Place (2018)

Discussion in 'Movies' started by Tino, Mar 11, 2018.

  1. Malcolm R

    Malcolm R Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2002
    Messages:
    18,049
    Likes Received:
    4,835
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Real Name:
    Malcolm
    That's exactly what I got from the trailers. Colin's reveal that this was a planet-wide infestation of aliens that had decimated all of humankind was a surprise reveal (to me, anyway). I think that's a significant spoiler to most (though spoilers don't bother me much, personally).
     
    Tino and Josh Steinberg like this.
  2. Josh Steinberg

    Josh Steinberg Executive Producer
    Reviewer

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2003
    Messages:
    17,674
    Likes Received:
    21,493
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Real Name:
    Josh Steinberg
    I think this is a great discussion about what constitutes a spoiler - and I also think it's clear from this discussion that reviewers probably shouldn't spend too much time being concerned about this.

    For those readers who want to go in blindly (or as close to that as possible) no amount of vague writing will make everyone happy. But on the flip side, the less detail one brings up in writing a review, the less ability one has to critique that film. A review, in a sense, is like an argument or an essay - I'm trying to convince you of something and I'll cite evidence to make my point. If I can't cite any evidence, it's very hard to make an effective point. Someone who doesn't care about reviews anyway won't be bothered by that, but those who do look to reviews will be. So as a writer, I feel like my concern needs to be for the people who intend to read, who are gladly trading total surprise for a little bit of context, and do my best to use the movie's own stengths and weaknesses to express my reactions.

    What's interesting to me about this discussion with this specific film is that I believe talking about the film's prologue allows a critic to analyze the entire film while only revealing details from the first ten minutes or less. For most movies that I see and write about, I feel like I need to be able to freely discuss the first 20-30 minutes to get a handle on it. And that doesn't necessarily mean transcribing every detail from the film and writing it down. A review is more than just a summary, or should be, at any rate. But I feel like there usually is a certain amount of detail that's needed. A review needs to work for people who have seen the movie too and want to reflect on what they've just watched. I find it difficult and unenjoyable to read reviews where the writer feels that they can't say anything about the film at all.
     
    Colin Jacobson likes this.
  3. Dick

    Dick Lead Actor
    Supporter

    Joined:
    May 22, 1999
    Messages:
    8,272
    Likes Received:
    4,940
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Maine
    Real Name:
    Rick
    Someone above this post may have already talked about this, but here goes...

    I saw this yesterday and would have loved it unconditionally except for...a number of jarring sound jolts.

    John Krasinski has made a generally awesome sci-fi film, choosing incredible effective sound manipulations and some absolute silence in many places. We get that so seldom that I can't actually name another movie off the top of my head that revels in its silent passages as much as this one does since, say, RIFIFI.

    However, at about a half-dozen points, the director/composer choose to fall back on the tired cliche of accompanying a quick visual occurrence with a loud burst of music or sound effect. This film DID NOT NEED THAT. One specific example: in a cornfield, a child's hand suddenly reaches into the frame and grabs another's by the wrist. On the soundtrack there is a ridiculously loud sound that in no way resembles what a person grabbing another by the wrist would sound like, plus a burst of music. The simple visual of that hand appearing to grab the wrist is -- in and of itself -- completely adequate for startling the crap out of us...the composer and sound editor need not have been involved.

    What makes this film so otherwise dynamic and almost unbearably tense is the absence of sound, not the augmentation of it. There were other momentary instances of such augmentation throughout the film that nearly deafened me. I asked the manager if he was running the film at reference sound levels and he insisted he was. If so, that is a major weakness (aside from plot holes) that keeps this from being a four-star effort.

    Aside: I paid for (in advance) a seat in my local Regal in row B center, my favorite seat. Two seats down from me sat an older couple with their popcorn and candy. Although they didn't talk after the trailers, their goddamn popcorn bag and candy wrappers really distracted me for about fifteen minutes. Aren't these assholes aware that they might actually be annoying to other people who came to see a movie called A QUIET PLACE?
     
  4. Colin Jacobson

    Colin Jacobson Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2000
    Messages:
    9,328
    Likes Received:
    3,180
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    I think you might need the proverbial chill pill. Just because a movie is called "A Quiet Place" doesn't mean the audience needs to be absolutely silent as well.

    What are audiences supposed to do - use mittens to eat during the movie?
     
  5. Dick

    Dick Lead Actor
    Supporter

    Joined:
    May 22, 1999
    Messages:
    8,272
    Likes Received:
    4,940
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Maine
    Real Name:
    Rick
    Great idea!
     
  6. TravisR

    TravisR Studio Mogul

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2004
    Messages:
    34,081
    Likes Received:
    11,339
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    The basement of the FBI building
    You're right that some of the "LOUD noise!" scares didn't always make sense in terms of something making a particular sound but I thought that A Quiet Place was somewhat reserved in its use of cheap "LOUD noise!" scares. Sure, there's some but it wasn't like a lot of modern movies where they have to use them because they failed to actually create suspense.
     
    Sam Posten and Josh Steinberg like this.
  7. Dick

    Dick Lead Actor
    Supporter

    Joined:
    May 22, 1999
    Messages:
    8,272
    Likes Received:
    4,940
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Maine
    Real Name:
    Rick
    I agree that the director was, as you put it, "reserved" in his use of such loud scares. But even the ones he did use were quite unnecessary. I just think there were a half-dozen times when he second-guessed himself, and needn't have.
     
  8. Sam Posten

    Sam Posten Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 1997
    Messages:
    27,703
    Likes Received:
    4,887
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Aberdeen, MD & Navesink, NJ
    Real Name:
    Sam Posten
    Doug Wallen, Tino and TonyD like this.
  9. TonyD

    TonyD Who do we think I am?
    Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 1999
    Messages:
    19,941
    Likes Received:
    1,801
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Gulf Coast
    Real Name:
    Tony D.
    Me too. I didn’t notice anything that came across as unnecessary or gratuitous.
     
    Tino likes this.
  10. Tino

    Tino Executive Producer
    Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 1999
    Messages:
    16,991
    Likes Received:
    8,665
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Metro NYC
    Real Name:
    Valentino
    This film has stuck with me since I saw it a week ago. Can’t wait to see it again.
     
  11. Message #111 of 143 Apr 15, 2018
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2018
    WillG

    WillG Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2003
    Messages:
    6,854
    Likes Received:
    832
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Saw it last night. Overall I was impressed with it. A film with barely any spoken dialogue is a risky prospect in this day and age. I liked that it was different (though if you’ve ever played “The Last of Us” not wholly original). Some of the plot holes some have mentioned didn’t bother me all that much (let’s face it, the premise of this move could never possibly work IRL), but there were some things that were questionable to me

    Why did that pipe suddenly fail and flood the basement. I guess it’s something that could happen in real Iife but usually a movie will telegraph it to some degree

    For how prepared that Krasinski seemed a lot of time in this world I was kind of curious why he didn’t carry some kind of noisemaking device on him when he was outside that he could toss as a diversion in a emergency. Maybe like some M-80s or something. Would have come in handy near the end. And BTW I was kind of hoping Krasinski’s would different, I don’t necessarily fault the movie, but I find the Father sacrifices himself to be kind of cliche at this point.

    I kind of though that the daughter and her sense of guilt and feeling that her father blamed her for the death of their other child was somewhat underdeveloped. Unless I missed something, it didn’t really seem to get addressed until near the end

    I’m surprised no one has seems to have discussed the ending so far

    im not sure what to think about it. I don’t mind a movie keeping its ending ambiguous, but this movie just ended right in the middle of rising action. Normally I would think it’s kind of a cheat to end a movie like that, but my rationale I guess in this case is that whatever the outcome of what was about to happen doesn’t really matter, ultimately this family is pretty much fated to eventual doom. And maybe in a way that’s better. For me this is defiantly one of those movies that presents a world in which I feel that I wouldn’t want to survive anyway
     
  12. Adam Lenhardt

    Adam Lenhardt Director

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2001
    Messages:
    22,559
    Likes Received:
    8,028
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Albany, NY
    Given the stellar reviews, and the way this movie showcased the sound the way Darkest Hour showcased Gary Oldman's performance, I think this is already the frontrunner for the Sound Design and (especially) Sound Mixing Oscars next year.

    After Wonderstruck and this, I think Millicent Simmonds has a real shot at being the next Marlee Matlin (ie. a Deaf actress who is a name actress even among hearing audiences).

    In a way, it becomes a self-sustaining thing: Directors hire her because they have a Deaf character and she's the only Deaf actress in the age range they've heard of, which in turn builds the resume and builds the competitive advantage for future roles. And there's probably quiet a few talented young Deaf actresses that can't break in because nobody's willing to take the risk to give them that first silver screen part to prove themselves.

    None of which is a slight against Simmonds. She is phenomenal here; in may ways, her character's arc is the spine of the movie.

    In the silent film era, lots of Deaf actors got hired, often playing hearing characters. When you spend most of your day every day surrounded by people unequipped to communicate in your native language, you get really good at nonverbal communication, using body language and facial expression to get your point across. Even though she's not even old enough to drive, Simmonds had far more experience than any of the other actors at the kinds of communication this story required -- and not just sign language.

    If I was the parent of young children in a post-apocalyptic world where ferocious carnivore alien apex predators were roaming the countryside, I'd keep my kids close too.

    If my middle child was seriously ill and needed antibiotics, I'd go to the one pharmacy in my small farm town to acquire them. I'd trust that after three months of driving the importance of silence into their heads that my kids would continue to follow the rules as they have at home for weeks and weeks now.

    The sister very purposefully gave her younger brother the toy but not the batteries to power it. The father clearly explained the consequences of the toy and why they had to leave it. It's on the kid that he didn't listen.

    I will give you this one. If ever there was a time to utilize birth control, it's this scenario right here.

    This is something the movie did very well. I was expecting a ton of jump scares, but there were only a small handful. The movie got far more tension out of the genuine suspense, where we could see the alien but the characters couldn't.

    It wasn't simply bent over, though. It was firmly nailed into the stair. Only the head of the nail was slightly bent. The mother's laundry bag or whatever caught on the raised edge of the head of the nail and pried it up.

    I agree. And two of the shows I enjoyed a lot in recent years, "Switched at Birth" and "The Magicians", had prominent Deaf characters with subtitled sign language.

    My one complaint in this area is that Krasinski and his DP Charlotte Bruus Christensen were too tight with the framing in these moments, so that most of the signing wasn't visible on screen. Given that this movie is likely to attract a lot of interest from the Deaf community, it would have been nice for them to photograph it in such a way that those who are fluent in ASL didn't have to rely on the subtitles to understand what the characters are signing.

    For me, definitely. It'd be like discussing Psycho in 1960 and revealing that Janet Leigh gets murdered in the shower. Yeah, it happens early in the running time, but it's a crucial surprise on which the remainder of the film pivots.

    The New York Times review spoiled this one for me. And while it wasn't a huge surprise (based on who was and wasn't present in the trailers), the movie still would have been a bit more effective if I hadn't gone in knowing that.

    I thought the movie did a very good job of giving us the information we needed to understand the rules of the world very early on, first with the old newspapers outside the pharmacy and then a short while later with the panning shot of the basement with all of the clippings the father had collected as he attempted to piece together information about this new and harrowing threat.

    My favorite bit was the signal fires on top of the grain silos, so that the surviving families in the valley could communicate to each other that they were still there. And then the hopelessness that comes by the end, when the kids light the fire but don't have enough lighter fluid left to get the flames high enough, and no responses come back.

    I loved that
    It was the daughter who figured out the connection between high frequency sound and weakening/disorienting the alien monsters. The father/daughter estrangement is the heart of the movie, and the payoff of that, with the father following the son's advice and telling the daughter he loves her and has always loved her right before he sacrifices himself, and then her using the improvised hearing aid he made to neutralize the threat -- just perfect.

    And the use of the wireless analog security cameras was extremely elegantly done; the daughter saw that the signal broke up into snow when the aliens got too close, and that it destroyed the broadcast equipment when it got too close, which allowed her to put two and two together with the very high frequency signal in a visual way, which in turn allowed her to make the connection with the painful feedback from the new hearing aid.

    I would agree that Marco Beltrami's score was one of the weaker points for the film. I would have liked a lot more moments where the sound effects were allowed to just stand by themselves and create the ambience, without the score telling you how to feel.

    I think there was a complex interplay going on there between the fallout from her decision to give her youngest brother the toy and her father's perceptions about the limitations inherent with her disability. The father's fear seemed to be that if she couldn't hear the noises that draw the aliens and the noises the aliens themselves make, it made her vulnerable and therefore the son was a better investment for training to be his backup. But presumably before the stakes were life and death, he never put such limitations on her and engaged in ableist thinking so the daughter thinks he's punishing her for what happened at the beginning of the movie.

    I had the exact opposite interpretation:
    The movie ends with the daughter having found the frequency that debilitates the aliens, and the mother used the shotgun to kill the first one while it was in that state. My guess is that they killed the other two local aliens shortly after the movie cut to credits, and then worked to spread the word to other survivors. The global population is obviously decimated at this point, probably less than one percent of what it was before Day 1. But that's still potentially millions of people around the world, enough to get the human race started again.

    If they do a sequel, they could either:
    follow the surviving family members as they work to exterminate the threat and share their knowledge, or they could follow a different group of survivors elsewhere in the country or the world and see how they're dealing with the threat.
     
  13. TonyD

    TonyD Who do we think I am?
    Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 1999
    Messages:
    19,941
    Likes Received:
    1,801
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Gulf Coast
    Real Name:
    Tony D.
    I agree with adam on the ending I saw it as a clear
    "Sign of Hope."
     
    Doug Wallen and Tino like this.
  14. Colin Jacobson

    Colin Jacobson Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2000
    Messages:
    9,328
    Likes Received:
    3,180
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Disagree. Makes MUCH more sense to leave the kids at home with one parent and send the other parent to get the medicine.

    The family is way more vulnerable in the unpredictable environment of the town than the relative safety of their home.

    Also much more likely one of the kids will 'go rogue' and cause problems when in a less structured setting.


    A) It's only been 3 months, as you note - not a ton of time to absorb the new reality of this world.
    B) Kids are inherently unpredictable - and the younger they are, the less predictable.

    Sorry - I still see zero reason for anyone other than the father to go into town. It's simply a choice that exists to motivate the plot and not something that makes "real world" sense...


    Another disagreement.

    You can't leave a little kid unsupervised and expect him to "follow the rules". He's very young and clearly doesn't really understand the reality of the situation - he thinks the family will be able to take a rocket and fly away from the creatures.

    This development was 100% on the parents. They supervised the kid poorly - he should've never been there in the first place, and even if you think he did need to be there, they should've watched him better...
     
  15. Adam Lenhardt

    Adam Lenhardt Director

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2001
    Messages:
    22,559
    Likes Received:
    8,028
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Albany, NY
    If we accept that as true, then his fate was inevitable. If not this incident, then some other incident where his immaturity and failure to comprehend consequences would have led to the exact same reason.

    I think the point of comparison can't be a kid his age in 2018 Dutchess County New York. It has to be a kid his age during the Blitz, or in a war zone, or amidst an epidemic. Kids adapt remarkably well to life and death situations.
     
  16. Colin Jacobson

    Colin Jacobson Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2000
    Messages:
    9,328
    Likes Received:
    3,180
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Not necessarily - all the kid needed was a little supervision. Don't let him roam unattended in the store!

    I know the older daughter was supposed to watch him, but the kid was still the parents' responsibility.

    Besides, the older daughter's "failure" existed just as another cheap plot point so she could have a rift with the dad.

    Buck stops with the parents. Like I've said, there was no reason the whole family needed to go on this trip, and there was also no reason one parent couldn't tend to the sick kid while the other one supervised the other 2 kids.

    Besides, having a sick kid makes the "let's take the whole family!" thing even dumber. He's pretty sick but they think it's a great idea to make him trudge a few miles into town?

    And hey, no way a sick kid could possibly cough, sneeze, wheeze or make other noises. Makes much more sense to expose him to the elements instead of leaving him home in a better protected situation! :rolleyes:

    Agreed - but it's still a lot to expect a 6-year-old - or however old the youngest is supposed to be - to have the maturity necessary to really absorb the gravity of the situation.

    If you have kids in a circumstance like the one in the film, you would want to keep them as restricted and controlled as humanly possible. You wouldn't let them play in old cars or wander drug stores or whatever.

    Of course, 90 minutes of a family stuck in a bunker wouldn't be much of a movie, so I get that some stretches of logic must exist - I just think that "Quiet Place" pushes these too far, and there are too many of them.

    It's still hard for me to exist that these dolts are part of the apparent 0.01% of civilization who managed to survive! :laugh:
     
    Seppo likes this.
  17. Robert Crawford

    Robert Crawford Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 1998
    Messages:
    45,368
    Likes Received:
    21,032
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Michigan
    Real Name:
    Robert
    Adam,

    I'm glad you liked the film so did I and I plan on seeing it again this week.
     
    Tino and Adam Lenhardt like this.
  18. Sam Posten

    Sam Posten Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 1997
    Messages:
    27,703
    Likes Received:
    4,887
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Aberdeen, MD & Navesink, NJ
    Real Name:
    Sam Posten
  19. mattCR

    mattCR Executive Producer
    Reviewer

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2005
    Messages:
    10,896
    Likes Received:
    666
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Lee Summit, Missouri
    Real Name:
    Matt
    Major spoiler


    I was looking for a truly gritty version of that film. Success :)
     
    TravisR and TonyD like this.
  20. Message #120 of 143 Apr 19, 2018
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2018
    Malcolm R

    Malcolm R Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2002
    Messages:
    18,049
    Likes Received:
    4,835
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Real Name:
    Malcolm
    Our local hometown reviewer did not like it:

     

Share This Page

Movie information in first post provided by The Movie Database