A quick HDTV question.

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by George_W_K, Mar 5, 2003.

  1. George_W_K

    George_W_K Screenwriter

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    I was wondering about HD tvs. I know you need a separate tuner to watch a high definition signal. My question is, is this only for tuning in local high definition signals? Or do you need a separate tuner to watch digital cable and satelite tv? What about D-VHS? I thought you only needed the separate tuner for local broadcasts but the signs at Best Buy confused me and I wanted to be sure.

    Thanks for your help.
     
  2. Chris Clarno

    Chris Clarno Agent

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    Perhaps you should edit the title of your post as this is not a 'quick' question :wink:

    Most "HDTV" sets that you find today are actually 'HD-Ready' this means that while the set is capable of displaying an HD image, an HD tuner is not built-in. The reason most manufacturers don't include tuners, is they aren't sure how you'll be getting your TV signals. You may be on satellite, and if so, is it DirecTV, Dish Network or a BUD (Big Ugly Dish). Or perhaps you are on cable, and if so which of the hundreds of cable companies are you with, or perhaps you just use a plain old set of rabbit ears. Rather than include a tuner that you may or may not be able to use and thus increasing the overall cost of the set, they simply provide the appropriate connections for whatever tuner you need. These sets will offer various ways to connect an external tuner. The most common type is component video cables. This is a set of three separate video cables (1 red 1 blue and 1 green). Another, less common connection is RGB. This is very similar to a connection you might see on the back of a computer. Then there is DVI (Digital Visual Interface). this is a multi-pin connection that carries the signal to the set digitally. A variation on DVI called DVI-HDCP can be encrypted to protect digital content from unauthorized copying. For this reason Hollywood is pushing for DVI-HDCP to become a standard.
    [​IMG] The picture illustrates the back of a Samsung SIR-TS160 HD DirecTV box which sports Component, RGB, and DVI connections in addition to standard RCA (composite), Y/C (S-Video), RCA stereo, Coaxial Digital Audio and Toslink optical outputs.
    [​IMG]
    Yet another connection is IEEE 1394 (commonly known as Firewire or iLink). Mitsubishi and a few others are championing this connection. It can handle HD video and muti channel audio on the same wire. D-VHS and some HD STBs include IEEE 1394. The image above is the rear of a JVC D-VHS machine with IEEE 1394.
     
  3. George_W_K

    George_W_K Screenwriter

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  4. Robert_J

    Robert_J Lead Actor

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  5. George_W_K

    George_W_K Screenwriter

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    [​IMG]

    Thanks, Rob and Chris, for your help. That makes sense to me now. Now I can feel more comfortable when I start shopping around for a new set.
     

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