A Question about 16:9 recording

Discussion in 'Playback Devices' started by SteveK, Jul 21, 2004.

  1. SteveK

    SteveK Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2000
    Messages:
    518
    Likes Received:
    0
    My Toshiba PVR/DVDR offers a choice of recording in 4:3 or 16:9 aspect ratios, but I'm assuming that I would have no use for the 16:9 as I do not receive any HDTV signals. I do record widescreen movies from Turner Classic Movies, Fox Movie Channel and IFC, but I'm assuming that these are broadcast in a 4:3 letterbox ratio rather than true 16:9. Is this a correct assumption, or should I record in 16:9 and use the enhanced 16:9 mode on my Sony to watch widescreen recordings?

    The few movies I've recorded from TCM I've recorded using the 4:3 setting, and I'm assuming that the 16:9 setting would distort the signal. Please verify that this assumption is correct. Also, when would the 16:9 setting on the DVD recorder be the correct one to use? I could try it and see what happens, but TCM doesn't repeat their movies often enough to make re-recording a viable option (although a movie would likely be repeated some future month).

    Thanks in advance for any explanations.

    Steve K.
     
  2. JohnDG

    JohnDG Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2000
    Messages:
    238
    Likes Received:
    0
    Steve,

    You understand correctly: 16:9 is pretty much only for HDTV signals that are down rezzed to 480i and directed to output an anamorphic signal. This may also apply to digital cameras that can record in 16:9.

    jdg
     
  3. SteveK

    SteveK Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2000
    Messages:
    518
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks, John, that's what I thought. I was hoping I was wrong, as I'd love to be able to use the enhanced 16x9 setting on my television for TCM widescreen movies that I record so that I could benefit from the improved resolution. Oh well, maybe that day will come sooner or later. Thanks again for confirming my assumptions.

    Steve K.
     

Share This Page