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A little confused on how non-anamorphic discs will be displayed on a 16x9 TV.

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by jeff lam, Aug 12, 2002.

  1. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    Jeff Lam
    Just when I think I figured it out, I find another way to get confused.
    A long time ago, someone pointed out this site with this page and while thinking a non anamorphic image on a 16x9 set will have a 4x3 letterboxed image on the screen with black or grey bars on the sides as well as black bars at the top just like the page has it. I am wondering what TV mode (4x3, full, just, zoom) will display this image and if it will change when you change the mode.
    http://www.thedigitalbits.com/articl...516x9tvlbx.jpg
    For this image, is this using the full mode or 4x3 mode? I think I understand it as using a 4x3 mode. what will hapen to it using full mode? I understand it as stretching it horizontally only and it looking very, very wide. Is this correct?
    Also, will viewing a non-anamorphic disc in zoom mode allow you to get the propper picture on the screen while preserving the aspect ratio?
    What is the "JUST" setting?
    Also, what happens when a DVD player scales? When you have a player that scales, can you leave the TV in full mode?
    Thanks!
     
  2. Brian Kleinke

    Brian Kleinke Supporting Actor

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    http://www.thedigitalbits.com/articl...516x9tvlbx.jpg
    That image on my Sony XBR 57" 16:9 RPTV would be considered Normal or 4x3 mode. In full it would stretch the image out. The Sony's have a zoom mode which correctly stretches the picture so that it's in the proper aspect ratio.
    Hopefully that helps.
    Brian
     
  3. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    When the DVD player scales...
    The more common DVD player scaling shrinks the picture horizontally while leaving the height the same. Its purpose is for 4:3 programs played on TV sets that are stuck in 16:9 mode (Avoid buying such a TV set, that discussion is another program) The effect is the same as regular 16:9 mode on the player and selecting the aspect ratio on the TV. Try it both ways to see which gives the better picture. There is a right way and a wrong way to do it. The right way makes each of the 720 pixels of picture content on a DVD scan line 1/960'th the screen width in thickness and adds black pixels at the sides. The wrong way scales each row of 720 pixels onto the inner 540 pixels of the scan line. NOTE: This scaling is not the same as 4:3 pan and scan mode, it does not chop the sides off the picture.
    The other kind of DVD scaling spreads the inner 360 rows of pixels to occupy all 480 scan lines and its purpose is to display non-anamorphic wide screen programs better with the TV in 16:9 mode. Some TV set zooms do the same thing (electronic zoom), other TV set zooms spread out the inner 360 scan lines to fill the screen (optical zoom). Here, also, the quality can vary depending on the formula used and may or may not look better than optical zoom.
    Try the player in the store before buying to see whether it has either or both of these scalings and see how good it is.
    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/vidscale.htm
     
  4. Jan Strnad

    Jan Strnad Screenwriter

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  5. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    The picture on a non-anamorphic DVD already has less resolution when it was produced, compared with the same program on an anamorphic disk (assuming both editions exist). The reason is in the reply immediately above. Zooming the TV or scaling the DVD player for a non-anamorphic disk should not lose any more. But once resolution is lost due to fewer scan lines, scaling up to more scan lines will not reclaim it.
     

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