What's new

Robert Crawford

Crawdaddy
Moderator
Patron
Senior HTF Member
Joined
Dec 9, 1998
Messages
62,134
Location
Michigan
Real Name
Robert
All I can say is what I see.

On my Sony 4K player and LG 4K OLED, the 4K appeared notably darker than the BD.

Did you compare the two? Maybe you'll think the BD looks too bright and the 4K "just right".

I found the BD more satisfying, but YMMV.
As I stated, I'm very happy with the 4K disc so why should I bother to watch the Blu-ray looking for issues. I can understand you as a reviewer doing so, but I'm a happy camper.
 

obscurelabel

Stunt Coordinator
Joined
Dec 11, 2003
Messages
152
Real Name
Larry
There is a scene near the end that looks quite a bit more "dupey" than the rest of the film, at least on the Collector's Edition DVD. I don't have the disc at hand to check and my memory isn't perfect, but I believe it's just before the school pageant, during the daytime, and Atticus and Scout are walking down the street. It's possible that this scene is a blowup, or of course the best available material was used if none better exists. If my description isn't too far off, can anyone comment on how the scene looks now?
 

Matt Hough

Reviewer
Senior HTF Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2006
Messages
25,247
Location
Charlotte, NC
Real Name
Matt Hough
I watched my old Blu-ray last night (which was part of the Gregory Peck Collection which I reviewed when it was released). I adore the film, but it looked just wonderful to me, and I'm satisfied with what I have.
 

HarleyDog

Stunt Coordinator
Joined
Oct 13, 2011
Messages
69
Real Name
Dennis Haney
I will add my two cents. My partner came into the room when I was watching the 4k and commented how amazing the picture looked. To Kill a Mockingbird is one of his very favorite films, having watched the BD many times, and he usually doesn't notice such things. He was also blown away by how much improved Blow Out looked in 4k, noting how grungy the film used to look.
 

Jonathan Perregaux

Screenwriter
Joined
Oct 10, 1999
Messages
1,871
Real Name
Jonathan Perregaux
I started watching this last night. Beautiful film, beautiful 4K. Everything about this movie is pure magic.
The film was shot in an early process called black & white, which eliminated color.
I understand it was also captured on a substance called celluloid, which eliminates all the constituent atoms from a subject and its environment. This innovation produces a much lighter (and thinner) representation of, say, Gregory Peck, or the Universal Studios backlot in Hollywood, where it was shot.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Forum Sponsors

Latest Articles

Forum statistics

Threads
353,234
Messages
5,012,263
Members
143,426
Latest member
lamywaby
Recent bookmarks
0
Top