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Robert Harris

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Robert Harris
I'm always hopeful, in an odd way, that there are some folks who will read these words and think "Sounds like a decent film. Time I saw it."

And I'm always a bit jealous of those folks, as although you can see a film dozens of times, you can only see it for the first time once.

And the impression of that initial viewing can be monumental.

Most people are unaware that To Kill a Mockingbird was actually based upon an award-winning novel by a young woman from Alabama - a friend of Truman Capote's.

The film was beautifully cast, especially the children. Gregory Peck has a meaty lead role, for which he received an award. Copies of his eyewear from this film are available in several colors. I probably need a pair.

Direction by Robert Mulligan is superb. Score by Elmer Bernstein.

There are two rumors that began flying about years ago. The first was that the film was shot in NaturalVision. The second is that it was Robert Duvall's first appearance on film.

I believe the first is false, while the second appears to be true.

The film was shot in an early process called black & white, which eliminated color.

Initial inclination learning this was coming to 4k was abject fear of hot white spots, and 4.0 density black.

Thank goodness, it didn't happen.

While the new 4k from Universal is encoded for HDR10, the process was performed with a very light hand, and for that I'm eternally grateful.

Beautiful work by Universal.

Grain structure is appropriate for the era, while not ever appearing obvious, especially from a nominal seating distance.

Gray scale is magnificent throughout, as would befit the work of Russell Harlan.

Now to the important feature of this unpacking podcast.

The packaging is simple yet elegant. Imagery with Mr. Peck at the centered in color, with a scene from the trial as background in black & white.

The slipcase is finished in matte, with the 4k Ultra HD logo at the top against a glossy black background.

The news here, and the reason for collectors to grab the first pressing, is that the title of the film, not only on the obverse, but also on the spine are beautifully embossed, with lettering in glossy black.

Normal reverse allowing for all the pertinent information.

Shot on location in Monroeville, Alabama, as well as on the Universal lot.

Tons of extras. One can probably spend a couple of weeks watching them.

Image – 5 (HDR10)

Audio – 5 (DTS-HD MA 5.1 & 2.0 Monuaral)

Pass / Fail – Pass

Plays nicely with projectors - Yes

Upgrade from Blu-ray - Yes

Makes use of and works well in 4k - 4

Very Highly Recommended

RAH


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Robert Crawford

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I'm always hopeful, in an odd way, that there are some folks who will read these words and think "Sounds like a decent film. Time I saw it."

And I'm always a bit jealous of those folks, as although you can see a film dozens of times, you can only see it for the first time once.

And the impression of that initial viewing can be monumental.

Most people are unaware that To Kill a Mockingbird was actually based upon an award-winning novel by a young woman from Alabama - a friend of Truman Capote's.

The film was beautifully cast, especially the children. Gregory Peck has a meaty lead role, for which he received an award. Copies of his eyewear from this film are available in several colors. I probably need a pair.

Direction by Robert Mulligan is superb. Score by Elmer Bernstein.

There are two rumors that began flying about years ago. The first was that the film was shot in NaturalVision. The second is that it was Robert Duvall's first appearance on film.

I believe the first is false, while the second appears to be true.

The film was shot in an early process called black & white, which eliminated color.

Initial inclination learning this was coming to 4k was abject fear of hot white spots, and 4.0 density black.

Thank goodness, it didn't happen.

While the new 4k from Universal is encoded for HDR10, the process was performed with a very light hand, and for that I'm eternally grateful.

Beautiful work by Universal.

Grain structure is appropriate for the era, while not ever appearing obvious, especially from a nominal seating distance.

Gray scale is magnificent throughout, as would befit the work of Russell Harlan.

Now to the important feature of this unpacking podcast.

The packaging is simple yet elegant. Imagery with Mr. Peck at the centered in color, with a scene from the trial as background in black & white.

The slipcase is finished in matte, with the 4k Ultra HD logo at the top against a glossy black background.

The news here, and the reason for collectors to grab the first pressing, is that the title of the film, not only on the obverse, but also on the spine are beautifully embossed, with lettering in glossy black.

Normal reverse allowing for all the pertinent information.

Shot on location in Monroeville, Alabama, as well as on the Universal lot.

Tons of extras. One can probably spend a couple of weeks watching them.

Image – 5 (HDR10)

Audio – 5 (DTS-HD MA 5.1 & 2.0 Monuaral)

Pass / Fail – Pass

Plays nicely with projectors - Yes

Upgrade from Blu-ray - Yes

Makes use of and works well in 4k - 4.25

Very Highly Recommended

RAH
I'm thinking of including this movie as part of my titles I'm watching in the "HTF October Scary Movie Challenge". In 1962, this movie scared the crap out of me more than any other movie I watched in my childhood. Both, this movie and "The Night of the Hunter" had a profound effect on me as not all monsters have to be supernatural nor creatures that walk on more than two feet. These type of monsters are real and even more scary to me.
 

benbess

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After this strong review I've placed an order, and the movie will now have a place on my chronologically arranged blu-ray shelf with the other movies from 1962, including Lawrence of Arabia, Billy Budd, Gypsy, The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm, Mutiny on the Bounty, How the West Was Won, and The Manchurian Candidate.
 

Robert Harris

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I'm thinking of including this movie as part of my titles I'm watching in the "HTF October Scary Movie Challenge". In 1962, this movie scared the crap out of me more than any other movie I watched in my childhood. Both, this movie and "The Night of the Hunter" had a profound effect on me as not all monsters have to be supernatural nor creatures that walk on more than two legs. These type of monsters are real and even more scary to me.
Amen!
 

Jonathan

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I haven’t seen this movie in far too long. I think it’s due time I see it again. Thanks for the reminder.
 

Taylor * D

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I'm thinking of including this movie as part of my titles I'm watching in the "HTF October Scary Movie Challenge". In 1962, this movie scared the crap out of me more than any other movie I watched in my childhood. Both, this movie and "The Night of the Hunter" had a profound effect on me as not all monsters have to be supernatural nor creatures that walk on more than two feet. These type of monsters are real and even more scary to me.

Which performance was more scary Robert; Mitchum in The Night of the Hunter or in Cape Fear?
 

haineshisway

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Question: Have they redone the way they'd done the shots that were optical blow-ups - on the Blu-ray, those have been degrained - not horrible and it didn't bother me, but I'm just curious to know if that was still the case.
 

Robert Crawford

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Question: Have they redone the way they'd done the shots that were optical blow-ups - on the Blu-ray, those have been degrained - not horrible and it didn't bother me, but I'm just curious to know if that was still the case.
I thought they looked fine on this 4K disc, I was paying particularly close attention to the courtroom scenes when Mayella Ewell was testifying.
 

Robert Crawford

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Which performance was more scary Robert; Mitchum in The Night of the Hunter or in Cape Fear?
I was much younger when I first watched "The Night of the Hunter" so that was more frightening for me as Mitchum was after kids my age at that time. I didn't see "Cape Fear" until I was a young teenager so I was a little more mature to handle his performance.
 

madfloyd

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Nice to read that this was made with care. I've never seen it (but now have it) and am looking forward to experiencing it.
 

JoeBond

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I'm thinking of including this movie as part of my titles I'm watching in the "HTF October Scary Movie Challenge". In 1962, this movie scared the crap out of me more than any other movie I watched in my childhood. Both, this movie and "The Night of the Hunter" had a profound effect on me as not all monsters have to be supernatural nor creatures that walk on more than two feet. These type of monsters are real and even more scary to me.
Robert I agree. The Halloween scene is etched in my memory. I tried to make the case that this was a Halloween movie to my wife but she wasn’t buying it. Read the book in high school and saw the film then too. Agree on Night of the Hunter too. Haven’t seen it in a while but remember the creepiness of it all.
 

Bartman

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Trevor Bartram
I have the Blu-ray coming to replace my 2006 DVD boxset (finally). Online comparisons between the 2012 & 2022 Blu-rays show improved highlight detail (good) but reduced shadow detail (black crush, bad). Is this true for the 4K? If so, then there must be a technical reason for it. If it's not true, what's the reason (a by product of HDR grading?). Hopefully the 2022 Blu-ray has not been intentionally dumbed down. Why can't we get the best of both (Blu-ray) worlds?
 

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