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RolandL

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Roland Lataille

M90GM

Stunt Coordinator
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JUSTIN
Over the past thirty years or so, on various threads here on HTF and elsewhere, there has been such a hue and cry for Brothers Grimm to be restored, them folks better ste up.

First and most important, this is not a restoration, and I'm fully aware what that word means.

David Strohmaier and Tom March have gone so far beyond that concept, creating a version of the film that looks far better than it did upon release, that restoration is the wrong word.

They've taken it upon themselves to correct a multitude of technical problems, mostly applied to the animation work, that viewing this new Blu-ray from Warner Archive is a surprising pleasant expectation, beyond what many people many have been perceiving going in.

The multiple 2k scans, going out to 6, have been downrezzed to 4k and then to Blu-ray resolution without a hiccup in sight.

Blend lines are virtually non-existent, color is crisp and clean, images are stable to one another, and all is well in Grimmland.

There's also a terrific documentary on the tech courtesy of Harrison Engle, that runs over 30 minutes and breaks down the multiple layers of work into simple terms. It's beautifully made.

Please purchase at least three copies each and gift them for the Holidays.


For those unaware, the film comes two ways - letteredboxed and smile-boxed. Ya pays yer money, ya takes yer choice.

Image – 5

Audio – 5

Pass / Fail – Pass

Upgrade from DVD – Yes

Works up-rezzed to 4k - Yes

Highly Recommended

RAH
Nothing short of a magical release - how do they go beyond restoring and creating a "masterpiece" from an average-good overlong movie? Buy this package to see how....
 

John Sparks

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Another fantastic film. That 4 man toboggan was out of this world!:thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:

Next up is WINDJAMMER.
1652331468145.png
 

Dick

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Might just be a fingerprint on the disc. Try some washing-up liquid and lukewarm water.

For fingerprints or surface markings, you can clean it dry - use a clean microcloth, breath lightly on the disc, and run the cloth upwards from the center ring to the outer edge, repeating all the way around. I understand that mild dish soap is fine, but I prefer to avoid using liquid on a disc.

If the Blu-ray or DVD continues to freeze on one machine but not on others, try cleaning your player lens with one of those discs with the tiny brushes on them. If that doesn't work, either, your player may be aging and the lens is simply not reading the pits as well as it once did. I find that players die a slow death in this way, until it's so bad, they won't read many discs at all.
 

Stephen_J_H

All Things Film Junkie
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Put the Smilebox disc in last night, watched the restoration featurette and started the main feature. Absolutely gorgeous. Dave Strohmaier and Tom March have worked some major magic here. I don’t like the phrase “it looks like it was shot yesterday,” but this release looks fresh and bright, likely better than it did on original release. It also still looks like film, which I think is the highest compliment I can pay.
 

John Sparks

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Yeah, after the movie was over and when the wife called it a night, I decided to watch the Extras and feel asleep. Will have to save for another days.

Can’t wait to view them.
 

Matt Hough

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Great to have someone young being so enthusiastic about it. Those of us who saw it in Cinerama in its original release knew of its charms (which had been compromised all these decades by subpar elements), but now it's there for all to see.
 

roxy1927

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vincent parisi
For those who went to three panel Cinerama films wasn't sitting in the orchestra sides or even the mezz and balcony disappointing? I imagine the number of seats in the 'sweet' spot in the orchestra was pretty limited and hard to come by for the full immersion effect.
 

sbjork

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Stephen
For those who went to three panel Cinerama films wasn't sitting in the orchestra sides or even the mezz and balcony disappointing? I imagine the number of seats in the 'sweet' spot in the orchestra was pretty limited and hard to come by for the full immersion effect.
That's true of Cinerama screens in general, regardless whether or not they're exhibiting three panel Cinerama films. I used to see films all the time on the old Cinerama screen at the Cooper Theatre in St. Louis Park, MN. In fact, that's why I picked up a nearly life-long habit. When my dad took us to see anything there, he insisted on getting there at least an hour early, to make sure that we got seats in the optical center, at optimal eye level. Basically, dead center, in one of two rows. I spent decades of my life getting to any theatre ridiculously early, to ensure that I was at the front of the line, and could get the best seats.

Those days are over now, with the advent of online reserved seating, but I still have fond memories of standing for an hour with my dad, just to get those perfect Cooper seats.
 

Vern Dias

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Theodore V Dias
For those who went to three panel Cinerama films wasn't sitting in the orchestra sides or even the mezz and balcony disappointing? I imagine the number of seats in the 'sweet' spot in the orchestra was pretty limited and hard to come by for the full immersion effect.
Yes, very true.
I would always sit in the 4th or 5th row orchestra, dead center.

Of course, being 15 years old when The Princess theatre in Honolulu HI. was converted to 3 strip Cinerama in 1958, I always went to the matinee showings and getting that seat was very easy.

To this day in my HT, my primary seating is 8.5 feet from a 144 inch wide 2.76:1 curved screen.
 

RolandL

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Roland Lataille
That's true of Cinerama screens in general, regardless whether or not they're exhibiting three panel Cinerama films. I used to see films all the time on the old Cinerama screen at the Cooper Theatre in St. Louis Park, MN. In fact, that's why I picked up a nearly life-long habit. When my dad took us to see anything there, he insisted on getting there at least an hour early, to make sure that we got seats in the optical center, at optimal eye level. Basically, dead center, in one of two rows. I spent decades of my life getting to any theatre ridiculously early, to ensure that I was at the front of the line, and could get the best seats.

Those days are over now, with the advent of online reserved seating, but I still have fond memories of standing for an hour with my dad, just to get those perfect Cooper seats.


coopermab.jpg


coopermsc.jpg


100 foot louvered screen
coopermso.jpg


cooperml.jpg


cooperml2.jpg


coopert.jpg
 
Last edited:

RolandL

Senior HTF Member
Joined
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Messages
6,091
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Florida
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Roland Lataille
Yes, very true.
I would always sit in the 4th or 5th row orchestra, dead center.

Of course, being 15 years old when The Princess theatre in Honolulu HI. was converted to 3 strip Cinerama in 1958, I always went to the matinee showings and getting that seat was very easy.

To this day in my HT, my primary seating is 8.5 feet from a 144 inch wide 2.76:1 curved screen.


Princess - In 1958, the Princess became the 13th location in the country to be equipped for the new panoramic film sensation, Cinerama, which featured three projectors and a deeply curved wide screen. In this photograph, crowds gather for the premiere of the first film, This Is Cinerama, on July 22, 1958. The vertical neon sign alternately spelled “P-R-I-N-C-E-S-S” and “C-I-N-E-R-A-M-A.”
1653773209201.png


1653773337181.png
 

sbjork

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Stephen
There's also a list of all movies that played at the Cooper from 1962-1991, when it was shut down. It's on the St. Louis Park Historical Society website, or rather there's a link to it in the first sentence under "Cooper Theatre Milestones." Their site used to just mention that the list existed, but I encouraged them to track it down and upload it, which they graciously did. It brings back memories.

 

RolandL

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Roland Lataille
There's also a list of all movies that played at the Cooper from 1962-1991, when it was shut down. It's on the St. Louis Park Historical Society website, or rather there's a link to it in the first sentence under "Cooper Theatre Milestones." Their site used to just mention that the list existed, but I encouraged them to track it down and upload it, which they graciously did. It brings back memories.


Thank you Stephen for the link! They also have a link to Cinematreasures.com to see pictures of the Cooper. Most of those pictures were copied from my web site by kinospoter. I wish there was a way to contact him and ask him to stop and just show a link to my web site,

 

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