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TonyD

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Remind me .... how does it end again?
Excuse Me What GIF
 

sbjork

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One of the greatest screenplays.

Ever.
One of life's delightful little ironies is that David S. Ward was unhappy when Universal chose to settle a plagiarism suit from The Big Con author David W. Maurer out of court, as while Ward had used the book as a source, is is non-fiction and it was just one of many such sources that he used. So he really had the last laugh when he later won Best Original Screenplay (deservedly so, may I add.)
 

sbjork

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DNR is still evident, and I wish it was gone completely from this release. It is random, and it is minor, but it is there.

This could have been perfect, but for some reason it isn't. Like I said this is still by far the best it has ever looked on home video. I'm happy but just a bit confused as to why the film wasn't handled with the same level of respect throughout the entire film.
I don't agree that there is anything random about it. The Sting is loaded with optical transitions such as wipes, dissolves, & fades, and the shots with DNR are generally the leading and trailing shots surrounding those transitions. Universal must have opted for DNR in those shots to soften the grain structure and better match the surrounding material. The reason why it may seem random is that there are so many such transitions that after awhile you don't really associate the softer shots with them. Some of those shots are pretty long, too, which also makes it easy to forget that they are attached to the transitions.
 

ManW_TheUncool

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I don't agree that there is anything random about it. The Sting is loaded with optical transitions such as wipes, dissolves, & fades, and the shots with DNR are generally the leading and trailing shots surrounding those transitions. Universal must have opted for DNR in those shots to soften the grain structure and better match the surrounding material. The reason why it may seem random is that there are so many such transitions that after awhile you don't really associate the softer shots with them. Some of those shots are pretty long, too, which also makes it easy to forget that they are attached to the transitions.

It would seem so... though unfortunately, it's still fair enough that many will find that to be seemingly "random" (and jarring) for their actual experience and enjoyment of the movie.

Personally, I just mostly ignored/overlooked that artifact (of the overall process), but it's obvious enough and may well be too jarring for many others...

_Man_
 

MartinP.

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In 2012 there was a 100 year retrospective of 36 Universal Studios Films at the Hammer Museum's Billy Wilder Theater in Westwood. When I saw The Sting, Robert L. Crawford was a Q&A guest afterwards. (I also saw Cobra Woman and Sweet Charity during the two month series.)
 

PMF

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