What's new

Blu-ray Review A Few Words About A few words about...™ - The Shootist -- in Blu-ray (1 Viewer)

Robert Harris

Archivist
Reviewer
Senior HTF Member
Joined
Feb 8, 1999
Messages
18,702
Real Name
Robert Harris
It was mastered at 2K. Doesn’t mean it wasn’t scanned at 4K or higher. Not sure it’s the kind of film that would benefit enormously from a 4K presentation. Ultimately everyone has budgetary limitations to work within and 4K mastering is a significant expense over 2K mastering, so if Arrow was only provided the rights to release it as a Blu-ray or felt the title wouldn’t sell enough for a UHD release to recoup its investment, that would explain their choice.
That’s not the point. One Never, Ever takes a unique element from the vault and does a 2k image harvest. You want an asset, and 2k ain‘t it.
 

Josh Steinberg

Premium
Reviewer
Senior HTF Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2003
Messages
26,552
Real Name
Josh Steinberg
That’s not the point. One Never, Ever takes a unique element from the vault and does a 2k image harvest. You want an asset, and 2k ain‘t it.

I’m not disagreeing with that.

The verbiage from Arrow states that they did their home video mastering in 2K. It says nothing about what resolution Paramount did the underlying image harvest in.

What I suspect - and the point I was attempting to make which may have gotten lost - is that it is entirely possible, indeed probable, that Paramount scanned the negative in 4K resolution and that those 4K base files were delivered to Arrow, who used them to create a 2K home video master.

If Arrow has only been granted a license to release this title on Blu-ray and/or concluded that a 4K UHD release wasn’t financially viable for them, it makes sense that they would not have put the extra time and expense into creating a 4K master they couldn’t monetize, when creating a 2K master out of a 4K scan is a lesser expense.
 

Robert Harris

Archivist
Reviewer
Senior HTF Member
Joined
Feb 8, 1999
Messages
18,702
Real Name
Robert Harris
I’m not disagreeing with that.

The verbiage from Arrow states that they did their home video mastering in 2K. It says nothing about what resolution Paramount did the underlying image harvest in.

What I suspect - and the point I was attempting to make which may have gotten lost - is that it is entirely possible, indeed probable, that Paramount scanned the negative in 4K resolution and that those 4K base files were delivered to Arrow, who used them to create a 2K home video master.

If Arrow has only been granted a license to release this title on Blu-ray and/or concluded that a 4K UHD release wasn’t financially viable for them, it makes sense that they would not have put the extra time and expense into creating a 4K master they couldn’t monetize, when creating a 2K master out of a 4K scan is a lesser expense.
Makes perfect sense. The cost is all in clean-up.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Sign up for our newsletter

and receive essential news, curated deals, and much more







You will only receive emails from us. We will never sell or distribute your email address to third party companies at any time.

Latest Articles

Forum statistics

Threads
357,599
Messages
5,141,326
Members
144,419
Latest member
Azy
Recent bookmarks
0
Top