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A Few Words About A few words about...™ Suburbicon -- in Blu-ray (1 Viewer)

Robert Harris

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As is my norm, I went into George Clooney's Suburbicon not having an inkling as to what it was about.

Outwardly, it had all the basic appearances of a high-end Hallmark production -- a film that would be good for you, and leave you smiling as it came to a close. I presumed that it would be some sort of comedy.

And I was correct.

Sort of.

Outwardly, this late 1950s drama has all the Hallmark trappings. Pretty people, nice community...

Except for one point, which in a way became a bit of a red herring.

The wonderful community of Suburbicon, est. 1947, was designed as the best place on the planet for close-minded white people to live.

That herring is that a wonderfully Hallmarkish black family moves in, which causes a bit of a kerfuffle.

Well. More than a bit.

With a terrific cast led by Matt Damon, the Moore sisters, and Oscar Issac, it takes awhile until we begin to realize that the film is not at all what it appears to be.

And then it turns distinctly Coenish.

A bit over 100 minutes later, I decided that I loved it.

The film is not for all tastes, and will probably never win one of those awards with the dove on it, but if you have a desire to see something with a slightly darker bent than the typical Hallmark epic, this one may just be for you.

Shot by Robert Elswit with a large format Arri Alexa, Paramount's Blu-ray is a magnificent affair.


Image - 5

Audio - 5 (DTS-HD MA 5.1)

Pass / Fail - Pass

Upgrade from DVD - Definitely

Highly Recommended

RAH

 
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Thomas T

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My main problem with it is that it purports to be a film about racism yet marginalizes the black characters so that they're barely in the film. They're stick figures while the white characters get fleshed out. It feels like two films fighting it out for dominance. One about a psychotic white family, the other about racism in suburbia. Frankly, I feel if Clooney wasn't going to give the black characters equal time, he should have dropped the storyline and focused on the psychotic white family's story. There were much better films along this line in 2017 like Get Out and Mudbound.
 

TravisR

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There were things that I liked about this movie (the Julianne Moores being a highlight) and things that I didn't like at all.

I saw it with a fairly decent-sized audience and it was kind of awkward when very few of the jokes generated laughs.
 

Richard V

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My main problem with it is that it purports to be a film about racism yet marginalizes the black characters so that they're barely in the film. They're stick figures while the white characters get fleshed out. It feels like two films fighting it out for dominance. One about a psychotic white family, the other about racism in suburbia. Frankly, I feel if Clooney wasn't going to give the black characters equal time, he should have dropped the storyline and focused on the psychotic white family's story. There were much better films along this line in 2017 like Get Out and Mudbound.

I could be wrong, but I think Clooney juxtaposed how the Idyllic white community demonizes the black family as being "unfit" to live in our neighborhood, while the seemingly "angelic" white community openly harasses, vandalizes, commits adultery, blackmails, gambles, conspires, defrauds, and commits murder. I figure the reason Clooney didn't flesh out the black family was intentional, showing how the white community didn't make any effort to get to know them as people either.
 

Colin Jacobson

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I could be wrong, but I think Clooney juxtaposed how the Idyllic white community demonizes the black family as being "unfit" to live in our neighborhood, while the seemingly "angelic" white community openly harasses, vandalizes, commits adultery, blackmails, gambles, conspires, defrauds, and commits murder. I figure the reason Clooney didn't flesh out the black family was intentional, showing how the white community didn't make any effort to get to know them as people either.

I agree with the first part - the "ironic" contrast - but less sure of the second. I think the lack of detail for the black family was more an attempt to make them symbols than anything else, so keeping their details fuzzy worked better in that regard - we could see them as "perfect" because we didn't know them well.

And I also think it was basic sloppy writing/filmmaking. Maybe there's a reason the script sat around unproduced for 30 years! :3dglasses:
 

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