What's new

Tino

Taken For Ballast
Premium
Senior HTF Member
Joined
Apr 19, 1999
Messages
24,019
Location
Metro NYC
Real Name
Valentino
but I just don't see how it would look better in 4K than the Blu-ray I already own given the TV movie quality sets, effects, etc
I disagree with your opinion about the effects and sets but based on advanced reviews, the 4K will look a lot better than the bluray. As I expect all 4K upgrades to. And yes, welcome to the forum. ;)
 

Tino

Taken For Ballast
Premium
Senior HTF Member
Joined
Apr 19, 1999
Messages
24,019
Location
Metro NYC
Real Name
Valentino
On the Star Trek VI transfer per TDB

Paramount has completed a new 4K scan of the original camera negative and master interpositive elements to produce a new 4K Digital Intermediate, complete with color grading for High Dynamic Range (both HDR10 and Dolby Vision options are available). While the film’s use of Super 35 results in a little more grain and a slight reduction in image detail, this presentation still represents a massive improvement over the 2009 Blu-ray. No longer is the image plagued by edginess, compression artifacting, and the dreaded Digital Noise Reduction that made the previous Blu-ray image so appalling to watch. Skin and costume texturing is nicely refined and the grain is organic at all times. Most of the large format VFX footage looks absolutely spectacular—the arrival at Spacedock for example, as well as the exterior matte shot of Camp Khitomer, the entire battle with Chang’s Bird of Prey, and the stunning shot of Enterprise and Excelsior orbiting into the sunset.
 

ManW_TheUncool

His Own Fool
Premium
Senior HTF Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2001
Messages
12,307
Location
The BK
Real Name
ManW
Yeah, I previously passed on nearly all the BDs of these 6 films, except the later, 4K sourced/remastered TWOK, because they were so mediocre/poor -- Paramount should never have released them that way, again excepting the later BD version of TWOK.

Of course, that was nothing new/unusual coming from Paramount. They had long been very poor and/or inconsistent w/ both their quality and quantity of catalog title BD output w/ relatively few exceptions.

_Man_
 

uncledougie

Supporting Actor
Joined
Jun 17, 2022
Messages
634
Real Name
Doug
I appreciated reading Mr. Thatcher’s well presented perspective. I was never into the original series, although certainly well aware of it during its first television run. I was familiar enough with the characters that ST:TMP resonated with me as a pleasant reunion with added one-off characters and a touching resolution to the V-ger question that resonated more in 1979 than it would today. I didn’t especially think of it in comparison to Star Wars from two years before (but then that year I was more of a Close Encounters fan in comparison - heresy to some, I know), but appreciated that the special effects were just a tad less convincing than either of the 1977 releases. I had an appreciation, though, for the more serious scientific tone Mr. Wise took instead of the in jokes and self referential mugging in later efforts. So different viewers come with different expectations and preferences, and that’s all to the good. I gladly watched the later Voyager and Next Generation shows because my other half was into all things Star Trek. And I’ve seen each of the newer reboot films with mild appreciation for the attempt. Label me on the fence about the whole enterprise (pun intended), but I’m glad there are fervent admirers, as it has certainly proved to be a cultural milestone over the decades. So that says something.
 

Robert Saccone

Premium
Joined
Jan 3, 2000
Messages
717
I grew up a fan of the original series which I was a bit too young to see when they were first run. Started watching them early in their syndication runs. After Star Wars I was thrilled that it was the catalyst to get Star Trek on the big screen. At the time I was disappointed in the first film but over the years it has grown on me. Really loved what Meyer did with II followed by Nimoy’s turns at the helm. I never thought the effects in the rest of the original motion picture series looked subpar compared to anything else that came out at the time. Certainly they don’t look like TV movie productions. Glad they are are all being released in 4K and I am looking forward to revisiting them in these new releases.
 

Dick

Senior HTF Member
Joined
May 22, 1999
Messages
10,012
Real Name
Rick
I'm not sure where I'd wind up on the Trekker/Trekkie continuum. The Original Series is always going to be the standard bearer for me. The Next Generation looks a bit fancy schmancy in comparison, but it still is limited in effects, etc. However, these are charms baked into these series. If these series were redone with unlimited budgets for effects, and only top notch Royal Shakespearean actors playing the parts (Patrick Stewart not included), it would lose all of the intangibles that made these series comfort food for me.

I have always found The Motion Picture cold and lacking those intangibles. Despite the best intentions that have been attributed to Director Wise in helping bring this movie to completion, I never felt that he was tuned in to the chemistry of what made the original series. Did he even see it? I get that his movie, his version of Star Trek, was trying to be intelligent and serious-- the anti-Star Wars-- but that's where I think it was the wrong approach. Much of the series at the top of its game was a buddy-buddy-buddy-buddy (including Scotty) adventure comedy, a social satire, and at the very least, a live-action cartoon dramedy. The effects didn't really matter to me, other than they looked okay. It was following the main characters, getting to know them, and rooting for them to succeed in their adventures. This is why the first movie, which was gestating for a very long time with many writers, and with Roddenberry's tendencies for pretension, has always been a slog for me. Truckloads of noble intentions still won't make me care for either of the movie's main characters, Decker and Ilya, even if the best effects surrounded them. Most of the movie seems more like a cast reunion special with too many ideas, and not enough on the chemistry that made the original series what it is in spite of cheap sets. Because The Motion Picture wants to be at least as technically proficient as Star Wars but not be Star Wars, it didn't put enough into wanting to be Star Trek.

From Star Trek II through Star Trek IV, the intangibles from the original series were rediscovered, and thus made these movies entertaining. Nicholas Meyer actually watched the TV series! However, I have always felt that V and VI were like postscripts to I-IV. Because Spock got to direct IV, and make it a solid entry in the series, V was fated to be a self-indulgent concilliation to Kirk, who was given the drek-tor's chair, almost like you have to give twin children the same gift, without preferring one over the other. As a result of Paramount having to do this, whatever V was originally supposed to be (the proposed Sean Connery version), the movie came out like a ready-made MST3K episode. I can almost imagine that the campfire scene complete with a round of "Row, Row, Row Your Boat" (itself a mockery or private joke that made no sense) was to be just like the beans afflicted one in "Blazing Saddles" until someone put their foot down. Star Trek V looks every bit like a made-for-cable show of the 1980s, and the intangibles of the original series largely forgotten, except for the choice bits from other parts squeezed into the Captain's. By the time Star Trek VI came out, I gave up expecting super-duper effects, as this entry looked as up-to-date as a Universal mystery-of-the-week TV movie, but had a decent story with the original series intangibles.

As to the newest 4K release, I took the bait back when the 4-movie set was first offered. I anticipated that the studio would re-issuing the same stuff over with extra junk just to get the one disc I want. I would like to see the director's cut of ST:TMP if only just to see it because I doubt that my opinion of it will change; the movie will still insist that I care about the leaden leads and not to the original characters that made me want to follow them to the big screen. I can live without Star Trek V, even though it is very unintentionally funny at the very same time it is very embarrassingly painful to watch. It gets sad after repeat viewings to never unsee the hair pieces, the Grecian formula, and the girdles. Star Trek VI to me is a good TV movie with the original series folks, certainly miles better than V, but I just don't see how it would look better in 4K than the Blu-ray I already own given the TV movie quality sets, effects, etc.

Please forgive my ranting as I have a love/hate relationship with the whole franchise. Don't get me started with the reboot movies!

Ya know, if you're gonna write three long paragraphs about STAR TREK V, I think you should be more concise with regards your feelings about it. Don't be afraid to let it all hang out!

;)
 
Last edited:

ScottRE

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2005
Messages
3,486
Location
New York, Planet Earth
Real Name
Scott
I'm not sure where I'd wind up on the Trekker/Trekkie continuum. The Original Series is always going to be the standard bearer for me.

I have always found The Motion Picture cold and lacking those intangibles. Despite the best intentions that have been attributed to Director Wise in helping bring this movie to completion, I never felt that he was tuned in to the chemistry of what made the original series. Did he even see it? I get that his movie, his version of Star Trek, was trying to be intelligent and serious-- the anti-Star Wars-- but that's where I think it was the wrong approach. Much of the series at the top of its game was a buddy-buddy-buddy-buddy (including Scotty) adventure comedy, a social satire, and at the very least, a live-action cartoon dramedy.

From Star Trek II through Star Trek IV, the intangibles from the original series were rediscovered, and thus made these movies entertaining. Nicholas Meyer actually watched the TV series!
As a fan since the young age of 4 years old, I know exactly where I'd wind up!

TMP was one that grew on me over time and I love it, honestly. Wise wasn't really all that familiar with the series, but the people who wrote it certainly were. The blame for coldness and lack of banter falls on them.

Classic Trek wasn't an adventure comedy unless we're talking about the three outright comedies Gene Coon produced in the second season. He was certainly responsible for the character familiarity and banter, but the series was still primarily serious. The social messages were more often serious commentary rather than satire. But there were a few satirical episodes. I feel like most people who peg TOS as campy, cheesy or overly comedic are looking at it through a modern lens.

As for Nicholas Meyer, he didn't watch the series in prep for TWOK, but Harve Bennett did. He watched every episode when he got the keys to the shop, which is why Khan was chosen as the adversary. People overlook his contributions and keep laying the title of Franchise Savior on Meyer when Bennett was the guy who wanted the films to return to their series roots. He was trying to make good Trek films and also wanted to please the fans. Granted, Meyer came in and saved TWOK from the mess of ideas it was, but he was in and out of the series while Bennett was there for four films. And while ST5 wasn't successful, at least it was close in spirit to the series and I still find it more enjoyable than both The Voyage Home and the overrated The Undiscovered Country.

I am thrilled the entire film series has gotten the 4K treatment. I'm not too annoyed at the release of the first 4 and then the rerelease later, since the success of the first release made these possible. So, for all of you who waited...you're welcome.

As for the "low rent" feel of the films, I disagree that they all look this way, The first two look great and TWOK looks more expensive than it was. However, the others, whether or not I love them, show their budgets.
 

sbjork

Supporting Actor
Joined
Aug 1, 2020
Messages
809
Real Name
Stephen
IIRC some of the themes from Goldsmith's earlier work in The Wind And The Lion were recycled for ST:TMP.
He also recycled the arpeggios during the V'ger flyby for Poltergeist. Bob Ezrin recycled the arpeggios from "Sad Song" on Lou Reed's Berlin for "Comfortably Numb" on The Wall. That's a perfectly natural way of reshaping motifs for different contexts. It's not quite the same thing as what James Horner tended to do, which bordered on open copying -- not just from others, but also from himself.
 

Colin Jacobson

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Apr 19, 2000
Messages
13,328
Again, as to specifics, color, densities, black levels, basic grain structure all looks pleasant.

Listening to the new "technical commentary" and they refer to having removed grain but they then "reintroduced it" to the "Director's Edition" of "The Motion Picture" yet.

Haven't watched it yet myself.

Thoughts about this "removal/reintroduction" topic?
 

Tino

Taken For Ballast
Premium
Senior HTF Member
Joined
Apr 19, 1999
Messages
24,019
Location
Metro NYC
Real Name
Valentino
People overlook his contributions and keep laying the title of Franchise Savior on Meyer when Bennett was the guy who wanted the films to return to their series roots. He was trying to make good Trek films and also wanted to please the fans
This! Bennett practically saved the franchise and indeed doesn’t get enough credit.
 

FWAJMB

Stunt Coordinator
Joined
Oct 22, 2013
Messages
70
Real Name
Jason Blosser
Likely to be lost in what will undoubtedly be thousands of responses to this post from rabid Trek fans (like myself). Paramount has never known what to do with Star Trek. As RAH pointed out, the films have always looked low rent. The fact that Paramount put the Six-Million Dollar Man producer in charge of films 2-5 says a lot right there. Space Adventures with William Shatner on a TV budget.

Star Trek II is one of my favorite movies of all time. I recently re-watched the film in 4K with a critical eye to sets and backgrounds. The improved clarity reveals so much cheese and duct tape holding some of the sets together. To fully engage with the original cast films, one has to often engage with the story and overlook the TV production quality.

I will disagree with RAH in terms of Star Trek: The Motion Picture. It is the one film in the series that benefits from a theatrical budget and stands up better today than some of the other films. It's the most "science fiction" film of the series.

And don't even get me started on the JJ Abrams reboot filmed at the Apple Store.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Sign up for our newsletter

and receive essential news, curated deals, and much more







You will only receive emails from us. We will never sell or distribute your email address to third party companies at any time.

Latest Articles

Forum statistics

Threads
357,880
Messages
5,145,245
Members
144,504
Latest member
hebecz
Recent bookmarks
0
Top