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mskaye

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Michael Kochman
Neither did TELL THEM WILLIE BOY IS HERE, with its Conrad Hall photography. Joseph Sargent's COLOSSUS: THE FORBIN PROJECT, which started life as a TV-movie, looks nice and cinematic with its well-filled anamorphic frame, as does THE ANDROMEDA STRAIN. Both FAHRENHEIT 451 and SLAUGHTERHOUSE-FIVE are practically art films in terms of their visual style. It may have taken big-screen Universal a little longer than the other majors to embrace late 1960s social changes, but they eventually did, and their TV side aggressively pushed small screen filmmaking to its creative limits during the same period (an era and sensibility that eventually opened the door for Spielberg's DUEL). which All films mentioned above directed by
What all those films have in common is that they were not directed by competent studio hacks but by film artists of a very high order! Let's not overlook Don Siegel's films - The Killers, Coogan's Bluff and Charley Varrick which look like ... Don Siegel films! Siegel was a master and is influence on Eastwood and Peckinpah still resonate even in current cinema. Sargent was like a poor man's Lumet but I mean that in a good way. George Roy Hill was a great director who worked at a very high level (you mention Slaughterhouse-Five but there was The Sting and Slap Shot for Uni as well!) Robert Wise had some genius moments apart from the mega blockbusters he helmed (Odds Against Tomorrow and The Set Up anyone?) Fahrenheit 451 is such an odd individual adaptation and I love it for that.
 
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Gerani53

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Nov 26, 2020
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144
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Gary Gerani
Hey... it's all good! Or great. And all part of our shared Hollywood movie heritage.
 

Scott Voth

Agent
Joined
Oct 9, 1998
Messages
30
The two scenes that have always stayed in my memory from this film,much of the film is truly mediocre to be sure, but I feel the film is worth keeping mainly for two scenes, both Stewart scenes, and Stewart at his best.

The “do you like her?" scene.
When Doug McClure is asking for Stewart’s daughter’s hand in marriage.

And towards the third act, the “ If you don’t try, you don’t do…” scene.

Those are two “great life lesson moments” from the movies. I saw the film back in the sixties at the drive in with my folks when I was 8 years old.
I’m now 65, and I never forgot those two scenes. When I was teaching cinema at my community college I did a presentation on "What I learned from Westerns" and I started out with those two scenes.
It's been a while since I've seen it so forgive me with more specifics
but the scene that sticks in my memory is the one toward the end where the son is stabbed in the back along with his wife by the raiders after the war is over.
I probably first saw this movie when I was around 10 and I'm 61 now and it still sticks with me. For me anyway this is one of the best Civil War movies out there but I'm of the opinion that Jimmy Stewart never made a bad movie along with John Wayne. The other thing is this movie is from the perspective of the South which is rare and I'm from PA. As they say history gets told by the victors but I've worked with people from the South and for many of them that war is still a sore spot 150 plus years later. I've always been of the opinion that there's nothing wrong with being proud of where you come from.
 
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daddyora

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Nov 29, 2019
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Coy J. Ramsey
I thought that this movie did a pretty good job of illustrating life on the fringes of the civil war. People didn't want to be involved with the war until it came to them and then they fought in order to protect what was theirs. Some of the acting was marginal but the message was there.
 

roxy1927

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Jul 10, 2018
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vincent parisi
I can't read a number of these because I've never seen the film and they sound like they've got a number of spoilers. I hate reading about great scenes. I want to discover them for myself. But I must be responsible for a few. I could have throttled the critic who gave away the ending of The Cameraman for me the biggest spoiler ever.
 

Santee7

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kirk
It's been a while since I've seen it so forgive me with more specifics
but the scene that sticks in my memory is the one toward the end where the son is stabbed in the back along with his wife by the raiders after the war is over.
I probably first saw this movie when I was around 10 and I'm 61 now and it still sticks with me. For me anyway this is one of the best Civil War movies out there but I'm of the opinion that Jimmy Stewart never made a bad movie along with John Wayne. The other thing is this movie is from the perspective of the South which is rare and I'm from PA. As they say history gets told by the victors but I've worked with people from the South and for many of them that war is still a sore spot 150 plus years later. I've always been of the opinion that there's nothing wrong with being proud of where you come from.
the scene that sticks in my memory is the one toward the end
where the son is stabbed in the back

And I gotta say that is possibly the best "directed" moment in the movie. Immediately the raider,
after stabbing Patrick Wayne, has that slow walk up the stairs, we see and hear the saber bouncing on the stairs as the raider moves up towards the goal of the defenseless wife, and we never see what happens to her or her baby. We do imagine.

This is truly horrific moment that stays with us. And in a normal western we would see the "bad guy" caught or killed. But like life, often there is no justice, and the the innocent ones are the first to fall. A very strong moment and one of Andy’s best directed moments.
 
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Santee7

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53
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kirk
What all those films have in common is that they were not directed by competent studio hacks but by film artists of a very high order! Let's not overlook Don Siegel's films - The Killers, Coogan's Bluff and Charley Varrick which look like ... Don Siegel films! Siegel was a master and is influence on Eastwood and Peckinpah still resonate even in current cinema. Sargent was like a poor man's Lumet but I mean that in a good way. George Roy Hill was a great director who worked at a very high level (you mention Slaughterhouse-Five but there was The Sting and Slap Shot for Uni as well!) Robert Wise had some genius moments apart from the mega blockbusters he helmed (Odds Against Tomorrow and The Set Up anyone?) Fahrenheit 451 is such an odd individual adaptation and I love it for that.
on the subject of Robert Wise, he directed THE HAUNTING, one of the most perfectly imagined horror films and most beautiful films i've ever seen, and often see over and over again.
. I watch it often just to, literally, "watch it" for the perfect images, perfect composition. Its a visual poem to me.
 

Robert Crawford

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I can't read a number of these because I've never seen the film and they sound like they've got a number of spoilers. I hate reading about great scenes. I want to discover them for myself. But I must be responsible for a few. I could have throttled the critic who gave away the ending of The Cameraman for me the biggest spoiler ever.
A good point! I've edited some previous posts because they revealed too much about the movie for those that haven't seen this film yet. It's an almost 60 year old movie, but not every one has seen this film.
 

Santee7

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kirk
A good point! I've edited some previous posts because they revealed too much about the movie for those that haven't seen this film yet. It's an almost 60 year old movie, but not every one has seen this film.
Sorry about that Mr. Crawford, didn't think about that spoiler thing.
Is there a place to learn how to edit in that spoiler marker so I can use it in future posts?
I intended originally to just be a "lurker" to learn about recent physical media releases. But I keep coming back.
I'm not much of a joiner and it is really dangerous these days to voice an opinion. But this may be one of the last oasis of movie sites where the users actually know who Walter Brennan is, and this place is filled with folks who are actually excited about buying a movie with no mention of STAR WARS or THE MARVEL UNIVERSE. I know, I know I sound like such a snob. I guess I am. Anyway I couldn't resist discussing.
I will no doubt sin again but don't want to ruin a movie experience for others.
Thanks!
 

Robert Crawford

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Is there a place to learn how to edit in that spoiler marker so I can use it in future posts?
Spoiler button is on the toolbar. Either click it first and type your text between the tags, or highlight what you've already typed and click the button.

A few of our valued members talk about using the "Spoiler" button in the linked thread below.

 

Robin9

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Robin
I'm not much of a joiner and it is really dangerous these days to voice an opinion. But this may be one of the last oasis of movie sites where the users actually know who Walter Brennan is . . .
It's not dangerous to express an opinion in this forum. Walter Brennan was a well-known character actor who appeared in several films which have passed the test of time and have been released on disc. There were numerous less well-known character actors and B movie star who remain familiar to many regular posters here!
 

Robert Harris

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It's not dangerous to express an opinion in this forum. Walter Brennan was a well-known character actor who appeared in several films which have passed the test of time and have been released on disc. There were numerous less well-known character actors and B movie star who remain familiar to many regular posters here!
“Ever been bit by a dead bee?”
 

Santee7

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kirk
Spoiler button is on the toolbar. Either click it first and type your text between the tags, or highlight what you've already typed and click the button.

A few of our valued members talk about using the "Spoiler" button in the linked thread below.

Got it! Now I see, thanks man, again sorry for not using that afore.
 

Santee7

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kirk
Love all the Hawks appearances of "old Groot". But my favorite Brennan performances are the few times he played a heavy. Like in MY DARLING CLEMENTINE. Where all those Brennan isms come to represent something much darker. And Ford was great in giving those tight close ups on Walter's face that showed the emptiness in his eyes. Anyway, as one who teaches 17-20 year olds, who are familiar with nothing beyond THE AVENGERS it is refreshing to discuss movies with those that know and remember.
 

Santee7

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Jul 18, 2021
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kirk
“Ever been bit by a dead bee?”
this was my response but put it in wrong place, makes me hungry to rewatch Have and Have not this afternoon

Love all the Hawks appearances of "old Groot". But my favorite Brennan performances are the few times he played a heavy. Like in MY DARLING CLEMENTINE. Where all those Brennan isms come to represent something much darker. And Ford was great in giving those tight close ups on Walter's face that showed the emptiness in his eyes. Anyway, as one who teaches 17-20 year olds, who are familiar with nothing beyond THE AVENGERS it is refreshing to discuss movies with those that know and remember.
 

Robin9

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Walter Brennan's range was wider than many people realise. I love it when he was cast against type; for example in Hangmen Also Die and Slightly Dangerous.
 

smithbrad

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Brad
Anyway, as one who teaches 17-20 year olds, who are familiar with nothing beyond THE AVENGERS it is refreshing to discuss movies with those that know and remember.
Shows where my head is that. When I first read this I was thinking "wow...17-20 year olds know the The Avengers, the British TV show form the 60's". Then reality sank in.
 

Nick*Z

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NICK
I've always enjoyed the movie for Stewart's homespun nuggets of wisdom on life, love and women. But for the rest, it really does have the look of a made-for-TV movie, the costumes, props and sets - just that, instead of appearing as timeless clothes, functioning utensils and authentic locations. It's the artifice that cripples much of the movie - also, the stilted acting from virtually everyone except Stewart. Also, the flat key lighting yields to no mood at all. There's no suspense to the several murders that take place here. It's a very pedestrian flick on the whole. But I still regard it for Stewart's marvelous work. Truly, the 'every man' was in a class apart. One of Hollywood's irrefutable untouchables!
 

jim_falconer

Supporting Actor
Joined
Nov 11, 2004
Messages
880
I've always enjoyed the movie for Stewart's homespun nuggets of wisdom on life, love and women. But for the rest, it really does have the look of a made-for-TV movie, the costumes, props and sets - just that, instead of appearing as timeless clothes, functioning utensils and authentic locations. It's the artifice that cripples much of the movie - also, the stilted acting from virtually everyone except Stewart. Also, the flat key lighting yields to no mood at all. There's no suspense to the several murders that take place here. It's a very pedestrian flick on the whole. But I still regard it for Stewart's marvelous work. Truly, the 'every man' was in a class apart. One of Hollywood's irrefutable untouchables!
Andy did the same thing a few years later in Chisum as well. Western clothes right off the rack, hairstyles and makeup right out of a 60s TV show, and a god-awful song in the middle of the film that completely stops it in its tracks for 3-4 minutes.

That said, the film being reviewed here is much more enjoyable than Chisum.
 

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