What's new

GerardoHP

Supporting Actor
Joined
Jan 10, 2001
Messages
740
Location
Los Angeles, California
Real Name
Gerardo Paron
Nomadland felt to me like a flat documentary without any dramatic arc. No conflict, no rising and falling action, no extraordinary denouement. I wasn't bored because the images were strong but, as soon as it was over, I felt empty enough that I wanted to watch something else, anything.
 

haineshisway

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Oct 26, 2011
Messages
5,020
Location
Los Angeles
Real Name
Bruce
One day, I'll try to watch it on Amazon Prime or Hulu as I can't remember which service has it. However, I know I'll have to be in a certain mood to do so.
I'll be the contrarian and say that I pretty much hated every minute of it. I thought it was not well directed (I stopped counting the sun just disappearing shots after about fourteen) - the actors were fine, but I was just so bored of all the staring off into space shots. I know I'm a voice in the wind on this one, but someone has to be.
 

Colin Jacobson

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Apr 19, 2000
Messages
10,762
Nomadland felt to me like a flat documentary without any dramatic arc. No conflict, no rising and falling action, no extraordinary denouement. I wasn't bored because the images were strong but, as soon as it was over, I felt empty enough that I wanted to watch something else, anything.

I think there's a dramatic arc, as the movie shows Fern's potential re-engagement with society.

Using spoilers so I don't get yelled at:

She's a complete loner at the start, but the movie depicts how she allows herself to get (semi) close to David and she also reconnects with her family.

Does she wind up anywhere different at the end than at the beginning? Perhaps not, but that's fine as well, and the movie leaves open the possibility she'll eventually reconsider her choices.

For me, the idea of whether or not she would abandon her disengagement with society was a definite "dramatic arc". No, I wasn't on the edge of my seat, but the question of whether or not she'd let down her walls and allow herself a personal relationship again...
 

Chuck Mayer

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2001
Messages
8,247
Location
Northern Virginia
Real Name
Chuck Mayer
I watched (Streamed) Nomadland this weekend to remove the unpleasant aftertaste of Without Remorse. Went in with minimal preconceptions, other than a) Frances McDormand is a treasure and b) if the People's Republic of China doesn't like Chloe Zhao, then I like her tremendously.

And I found the film wonderful. The discussion about whether it was inherently depressing or hopeful is an interesting one, reflective of the viewer more than the film itself. I found it deeply personal, and the filmmaking on display reminiscent of older Malick films (which I mean as a complement). I think the film makes it clear, more than once, that Fern is choosing this life, albeit for complex reasons. What she says, what her sister says, what her friends say (and her observations). I admired and appreciated this look at life on the other side of my middle class experiences, the good, the odd, the challenging, and the sublime.

McDormand deserves all accolades, and I equally felt Zhao's camerawork and structure really served the film well. It is a measured pace, without much in the way of traditional movie highs and lows, but I think such a format served the subjects very well.
 
Last edited:

Mark Booth

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Aug 25, 1999
Messages
3,006
NOT a depressing film. It's got some darkish moments but I wouldn't remotely call it depressing.

It deserved its Oscars and everyone that considers themselves a film buff should see this film.

But, if I was in charge, I would have still given Best Picture to 'Soul'.

Mark
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Forum Sponsors

Latest Articles

Forum statistics

Threads
347,106
Messages
4,802,838
Members
141,997
Latest member
merrickw
Top