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Nelson Au

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I took a look on Amazon for the Columbia 4K set that contains Lawrence of Arabia and I see it appears to be out of print. Prices on Amazon and eBay are reflecting short supply. I was looking because it looks like I’ll finally be upgrading my display to 4K.

I did see the post earlier that there is a sliver of hope that Lawrence could get a single release next year.
 

John Sparks

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Just looked up the price, $3K at Best Buy...is that a good price? My 65" TV barely fits into my wall space with 1/4 inch to spare. It would be nice to get a larger one, but it's not in the cards.

Enjoy yours!
 

Johnny Angell

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Just looked up the price, $3K at Best Buy...is that a good price? My 65" TV barely fits into my wall space with 1/4 inch to spare. It would be nice to get a larger one, but it's not in the cards.

Enjoy yours!
Yeah, that is the going price at the moment. When we first started to seriously look, the price was $3300. I can’t believe I’m spending this much for a TV and giving up 3D.
 

John Sparks

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Glad I have my PJ. My Mit 65738 shows 3D perfectly, but it doesn't look real from where I sit, 12', everything looks too small, that's why I bought the PJ.
 
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Nelson Au

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Johnny, I have my eyes set on the Sony A90J. I can’t believe I’m considering spending that much too. I hope it lasts a long time and stays from being obsoleted for a while. The technology now is changing so fast.

I don’t have it yet. I am talking to the dealer now.
 

Johnny Angell

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@Nelson Au Good luck on that. I looked on Amazon and the prices on Sony’s are pretty elevated, up there in Mt Everest terrify. We’re paying $3000 for the LG 77” C1. The 65” sony is $3800.
 

PaulRossen

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I took a look on Amazon for the Columbia 4K set that contains Lawrence of Arabia and I see it appears to be out of print. Prices on Amazon and eBay are reflecting short supply. I was looking because it looks like I’ll finally be upgrading my display to 4K.

I did see the post earlier that there is a sliver of hope that Lawrence could get a single release next year.

I believe that there’s more than a silver of hope that Lawrence is released in 4k uhd next year. It’s the 60th Anniversary in December 2022. It will happen sometime next year.
 

ManW_TheUncool

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Johnny, I have my eyes set on the Sony A90J. I can’t believe I’m considering spending that much too. I hope it lasts a long time and stays from being obsoleted for a while. The technology now is changing so fast.

I don’t have it yet. I am talking to the dealer now.
@Nelson Au Good luck on that. I looked on Amazon and the prices on Sony’s are pretty elevated, up there in Mt Everest terrify. We’re paying $3000 for the LG 77” C1. The 65” sony is $3800.

IF you can wait, maybe wait til next year's model announcement for the prices to get slashed for this year's. Think I saw that for last year's Sony OLEDs a couple months back... or at least wait til the usual holiday shopping or Super Bowl season sales I guess...

_Man_
 

Blu_rayfan66

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@Nelson Au Good luck on that. I looked on Amazon and the prices on Sony’s are pretty elevated, up there in Mt Everest terrify. We’re paying $3000 for the LG 77” C1. The 65” sony is $3800.
Compared to what large, good quality CRT's (tube tv's) were selling for 20 years ago we really have never had it so good.
 

ShellOilJunior

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Still no news of an unboxed UHD release for Lawrence but something for your amusement.

Prince Faisal's Mercedes is up for auction. Current bid: $1,611,111
 

Chewbabka

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Stephen PI

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Just put this on Facebook........

The story behind the post production schedule of LAWRENCE OF ARABIA was something akin to a nightmare.
Production was completed in late September 1962, consisting of the St. Paul's funeral sequence and Lawrence's death. They were still shooting in early October, mostly inserts.
To get the film completed by December 1962, was akin to an organized military operation.
Editor Anne Coates had been on the film since the beginning (the film started shooting in April/May 1961 in Jordan).
It was decided that the film would be cut by two teams. Director David Lean and Coates were based at Columbia Pictures' base (Warwick Theater) on South Audley Street in London. The cutting room assistants were Ray Lovejoy and Willy Kemplen, son of Ralph.
Coates had the sound cutting team, headed by Lean veteran Winston Ryder, all based down at Shepperton Studios.
Lean decided it would be better for the sound editors if they cut act two first as it was the busiest from the sound effects point of view.
Lean, although based at a nearby hotel ultimately had a bed set up at the offices at Columbia as it would save valuable needed time.
Eventually as the 1000 foot reels came to the fine cut stage, black and white or/and color dupes were made and sent down to Shepperton so that the sound editors' team could forge ahead.
The color cutting copy was then sent to Technicolor's London laboratory where the negative cutters went to work on the thousands of 65mm negative.
Once the first reel of 65mm negative had been assembled, a mute 70mm print was made and was sent to the Odeon Theater in Leicester Square, London. Lean would then go down to the Odeon in the mornings and view as each reel was completed.
The soundtrack was mixed in Shepperton's Westrex dubbing theater in a 4-track configuration mix (Left, Center, Right and mono surround.
Maurice Jarre, the assigned composer to write the score had sketches of his cues that he had written sent over to orchestrator Gerard Schurmann's flat and they were shuttled back and forth constantly as the music parts had to be prepared immediately for recording on Shepperton's music stage.
Famed conductor Sir Adrian Boult was assigned as conductor of the score but was unable to follow the methods of music recording with the visual streamers and fixed tempos. He did, however, conduct the overture which did not require picture.
Lean, while still cutting, found the time to view completed 70mm reels at the Odeon and make an appearance at the music recording sessions.
As the sound reels had been cut and dubbed, they were sent to Technicolor where they had a method or formula of converting the 4-track mix to a six-track 'spread'. The 70mm reels were magnetically striped and recorded and were then, again, sent to the Odeon where they were given the go-ahead by Lean.
This incredible schedule proved to be successful as the 222 minute version made it to its Royal World Premiere at the Odeon.
While the film was experiencing its successful Roadshow run at the Odeon, Lean returned and fine-tuned the film and reduced it by twenty minutes to 202. The twenty minutes were then removed from the original 65mm camera negative. The film had to be partially re-mixed which took place at Shepperton Studios in January 1963.
The revised version made its debut on February 7th at the Metropole theater in Victoria, London.
 
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Robert Harris

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Just put this on Facebook........

The story behind the post production schedule of LAWRENCE OF ARABIA was something akin to a nightmare.
Production was completed in late September 1962, consisting of the St. Paul's funeral sequence and Lawrence's death. They were still shooting in early October, mostly inserts.
To get the film completed by December 1962, was akin to an organized military operation.
Editor Anne Coates had been on the film since the beginning (the film started shooting in April/May 1961 in Jordan).
It was decided that the film would be cut by two teams. Director David Lean and Coates were based at Columbia Pictures' base (Warwick Theater) on South Audley Street in London. The cutting room assistants were Ray Lovejoy and Willy Kemplen, son of Ralph.
Coates had the sound cutting team, headed by Lean veteran Winston Ryder, all based down at Shepperton Studios.
Lean decided it would be better for the sound editors if they cut act two first as it was the busiest from the sound effects point of view.
Lean, although based at a nearby hotel ultimately had a bed set up at the offices at Columbia as it would save valuable needed time.
Eventually as the 1000 foot reels came to the fine cut stage, black and white or/and color dupes were made and sent down to Shepperton so that the sound editors' team could forge ahead.
The color cutting copy was then sent to Technicolor's London laboratory where the negative cutters went to work on the thousand's of 65mm negative.
Once the first reel of 65mm negative had been assembled, a mute 70mm print was made and was sent to the Odeon Theater in Leicester Square, London. Lean would then go down to the Odeon in the mornings and view as each reel was completed.
The soundtrack was mixed in Shepperton's Westrex dubbing theater in a 4-track configuration mix (Left, Center, Right and mono surround.
Maurice Jarre, the assigned composer to write the score had sketches of his cues that he had written sent over to orchestrator Gerard Schurmann's flat and they were shuttled back and forth constantly as the music parts had to be prepared immediately for recording on Shepperton's music stage.
Famed conductor Sir Adrian Boult was assigned as conductor of the score but was unable to follow the methods of music recording with the visual streamers and fixed tempos. He did, however, conduct the overture which did not require picture.
Lean, while still cutting, found the time to view completed 70mm reels at the Odeon and make an appearance at the music recording sessions.
As the sound reels had been cut and dubbed, they were sent to Technicolor where they had a method or formula of converting the 4-track mix to a six-track 'spread'. The 70mm reels were magnetically striped and recorded and were then, again, sent to the Odeon where they were given the go-ahead by Lean.
This incredible schedule proved to be successful as the 222 minute version made it to its Royal World Premiere at the Odeon.
While the film was experiencing its successful Roadshow run at the Odeon, Lean returned and fine-tuned the film and reduced it by twenty minutes to 202. The twenty minutes were then removed from the original 65mm camera negative. The film had to be partially re-mixed which took place at Shepperton Studios in January 1963.
The revised version made its debut on February 7th at the Metropole theater in Victoria, London.
Wonderful notes Stephen!

One addendum.

There was a processing problem at Technicolor, the affect of which was that every 70mm print, and there were about ten of them, began to turn GREEN, literally green, within a few weeks of dispatch from London.

This caused innumerable problems and costs. The end result was that Tech, which had already produced the 222 printing matrices, ate their cost.
 

Stephen PI

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Messages
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Wonderful notes Stephen!

One addendum.

There was a processing problem at Technicolor, the affect of which was that every 70mm print, and there were about ten of them, began to turn GREEN, literally green, within a few weeks of dispatch from London.

This caused innumerable problems and costs. The end result was that Tech, which had already produced the 222 printing matrices, ate their cost.
Thanks Robert that's great information to know.
One question, you mention Technicolor producing '222 matrices' (which I assume you are referring to the dye-transfer printing ones), when the film was cut, were the matrices re-made or were they cut to conform, or were you referring to terminology relating to 70mm printing?
 
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Paul Penna

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There was a processing problem at Technicolor, the affect of which was that every 70mm print, and there were about ten of them, began to turn GREEN, literally green, within a few weeks of dispatch from London.
Could have been worse; could have been TEAL:D
 

roxy1927

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vincent parisi
Well then what's that story about David Selznick walking with Lean on Fifth Av and telling him not to cut the film after the opening at the Criterion in NY. I thought the film that opened at the Odeon in London was the same film that opened in NY and Lean cut it only after its NY opening getting cold feet despite Selznick's advice. Was it cut after its London premiere and then again after its premiere in NY?
Of course it could have been cut in London before the NY premiere and after seeing it in NY Lean was thinking of further cuts.


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