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bujaki

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Jan 1, 2012
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Jose Ortiz-Marrero
I used to see Ms. McMahon at MoMA during the WB retrospective in 1973. She came by herself to watch her films. She looked like a sweet heavy-set Irish grandmother. She kept to herself and politely, very politely, refused to grant autographs.
Her supporting dramatic performance in the all-but-forgotten All the Way Home, alongside the brilliant Jean Simmons, is quite affecting. The film is not on disc but it's available to buy digitally. I recommend you do. It's based on the Pulitzer-prize-winning novel by James Agee, A Death in the Family, and the Pulitzer-prize-winning play All the Way Home. Highly recommended. I haven't seen the digital. I only saw the film once in 35mm and was stunned by the beauty of it.
I read the novel, the play and watched the film.
 

sbjork

Second Unit
Joined
Aug 1, 2020
Messages
331
Real Name
Stephen
So does RAH or anyone else who is smarter than me (which is an admittedly big pool to draw from) know anything about some optical work in one of the shots during "We're in the Money?" The shot where the camera starts on the face of Ginger Rogers and then pans from chorus girl to chorus girl before returning to Rogers is dupe footage, and it wasn't immediately obvious why, but then I noticed that there are extra frames duplicated during the closeup on each chorus girl's face. Just a frame or two on each, enough to hold the shot on each of them a fraction of a second longer. I'm wondering if anyone knows why that was done. All that I can think of is that the timing of the shot didn't quite work out, and it got back to Rogers too early, so the extra frames were added in post, where they would theoretically be the least noticeable, in order to extend it to match playback. But that's just an ill-informed guess.
 

Robert Harris

Archivist
Reviewer
Senior HTF Member
Joined
Feb 8, 1999
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15,685
Real Name
Robert Harris
So does RAH or anyone else who is smarter than me (which is an admittedly big pool to draw from) know anything about some optical work in one of the shots during "We're in the Money?" The shot where the camera starts on the face of Ginger Rogers and then pans from chorus girl to chorus girl before returning to Rogers is dupe footage, and it wasn't immediately obvious why, but then I noticed that there are extra frames duplicated during the closeup on each chorus girl's face. Just a frame or two on each, enough to hold the shot on each of them a fraction of a second longer. I'm wondering if anyone knows why that was done. All that I can think of is that the timing of the shot didn't quite work out, and it got back to Rogers too early, so the extra frames were added in post, where they would theoretically be the least noticeable, in order to extend it to match playback. But that's just an ill-informed guess.
One would have to examine negative edge codes for an accurate answer.
 

Bert Greene

Supporting Actor
Joined
Apr 1, 2004
Messages
961
I used to see Ms. McMahon at MoMA during the WB retrospective in 1973. She came by herself to watch her films. She looked like a sweet heavy-set Irish grandmother. She kept to herself and politely, very politely, refused to grant autographs.
Her supporting dramatic performance in the all-but-forgotten All the Way Home, alongside the brilliant Jean Simmons, is quite affecting. The film is not on disc but it's available to buy digitally. I recommend you do. It's based on the Pulitzer-prize-winning novel by James Agee, A Death in the Family, and the Pulitzer-prize-winning play All the Way Home. Highly recommended. I haven't seen the digital. I only saw the film once in 35mm and was stunned by the beauty of it.
I read the novel, the play and watched the film.

I always particularly liked Aline MacMahon's rare star turn in "Heat Lightning" (1934), one of my favorite WB-er's. With its crisp location work out in the desert, it would make for a nifty blu. Love its backdrop of roadside diners and motor-courts of the 1930s. Used to collect old postcards of such. Another movie from that same year utilizing such a backdrop was "She Made Her Bed" (1934-Paramount). It's not as good a movie, but it had the memorably unusual finale of Sally Eilers being stalking and menaced in her darkened diner at night by a live tiger, which her nogoodnik husband had bought as a tourist-trap attraction!
 

Jimbo.B

Grip
Joined
Dec 5, 2021
Messages
16
Real Name
Dimitrios
I just watched this after sitting on it for a couple of weeks and was totally stunned by how gorgeous it was. The opening number “We’re in the Money” absolutely sparkled off the screen! It’s so hard to believe these images are from 1933. It made me feel like I was in the audience on opening night.
 

cinefan

Stunt Coordinator
Joined
Sep 10, 2007
Messages
53
Real Name
Stephen
I always particularly liked Aline MacMahon's rare star turn in "Heat Lightning" (1934), one of my favorite WB-er's. With its crisp location work out in the desert, it would make for a nifty blu. Love its backdrop of roadside diners and motor-courts of the 1930s. Used to collect old postcards of such. Another movie from that same year utilizing such a backdrop was "She Made Her Bed" (1934-Paramount). It's not as good a movie, but it had the memorably unusual finale of Sally Eilers being stalking and menaced in her darkened diner at night by a live tiger, which her nogoodnik husband had bought as a tourist-trap attraction!
I'm quite late to this Aline MacMahon appreciation party, but am compelled to mention a starring dramatic performance that I only caught up with in the last couple years and that impressed me: Kind Lady (1935) from MGM, where
she's victimized by con-man Basil Rathbone in what eventually amounts to a home invasion.
Good movie.
 

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