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UHD Review A few words about...™ The Wizard of Oz -- in 4k UHD Blu-ray

Discussion in 'Blu-ray and UHD' started by Robert Harris, Oct 21, 2019.

  1. Robert Harris

    Robert Harris Archivist
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    Alignment of the matrices in 1939 was perfect, within the exigencies of the dye transfer imbibition system at that time, inclusive of the slightly soft bi-pack record.

    There is no difference between analogue alignment and digital, which is helpful in correcting shrinkage, and thereby attaining the original alignment.

    The only difference between a 1939 print and a 4k presentation is the increased resolution, which creates its own set of problems, that must be addressed.
     
  2. KMR

    KMR Stunt Coordinator

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    I don't see a smiley here, so I'm wondering: Is this a joke post?
     
  3. MatthewA

    MatthewA Lead Actor

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  4. Cranston37

    Cranston37 Cinematographer

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  5. Timothy A Goldich

    Timothy A Goldich Auditioning

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    The digital alignment is more perfect than a mechanical alignment could ever be. Wires have been digitally removed from the flying monkeys and lion's tail etc. Color, contrast, etc. have been adjusted to micro perfection. Every blemish, every scratch, every hair has been removed---no print of the film, not even a print that had never been played, could be as absolutely perfect as what we're seeing now.
     
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  6. Timothy A Goldich

    Timothy A Goldich Auditioning

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    Well, of course, they could. In fact, they have. Using that home footage that exists and various surviving still photos, there is a recreation of the lost sequence. If brilliant enthusiasts chose to go all out with it and truly fully reproduce the sequence, I'd be happy to see what they managed to create. It might even be fun to have the option of seeing it reinserted in the film. But it was cut for a reason. It messed up the pace of the film and the song wasn't very good and they correctly surmised that its reference to the "Jitterbug" dance would date the movie.

    Widening the film, if it was done well enough, would present no such issues.
     
  7. Robert Harris

    Robert Harris Archivist
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    We are discussing different technologies. Original prints were perfect. There were no wires to remove. Nor were there blemishes, scratches, or other detritus.
     
  8. AnthonyClarke

    AnthonyClarke Cinematographer

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    Yes, it's super-resolution of the new technology which suddenly poses the problems which now have to be resolved.
     
  9. Timothy A Goldich

    Timothy A Goldich Auditioning

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    Huh, elsewhere one hears about the digital restoration revealing a level of detail never seen before. Did some light from heaven materialize these flawless original prints you imagine? How is there no wires to remove? Did the monkeys fly and the tail wave by magic?
     
  10. Robert Harris

    Robert Harris Archivist
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    Have you ever seen an original print?

    You seem to be conflating two worlds.
     
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  11. Stephen_J_H

    Stephen_J_H All Things Film Junkie

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    Indeed. I believe the appropriate descriptive word for a flawless IB print is “velvety”. A perfectly registered IB print could cover a multitude of technical flaws, and reduce apparent grain. This was why part of the Techniscope package was IB printing, since reducing frame height by half, then squeezing or vertically stretching that element to produce an anamorphic print would increase the size of apparent grain.
     
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