A few words about...™ Susan Slept Here -- in Blu-ray

Robert Harris

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Frank Tashlin began his career in animation in the early 1930s at Van Beuren, before joining the Schlesinger team at WB. After a short stint over at Columbia, he returned to WB animation, while concurrently working on feature screenplays for several studios.

Among the more famous, Monsieur Beaucaire, The Fuller Brush Man, One Touch of Venus, The Paleface ( and Son of).

If you see a pattern here, Susan Slept Here, which he directed for RKO, fits right in.

Presumably in production late 1953 or early '54, Susan Slept Here is one of those miraculous early Eastman Color productions (probably shot on early 5248 stock), which unlike it later brethren, has stood the test of time in terms of fade characteristics.

Because of that, Warner Archive's new Blu-ray of the Dick Powell, Debbie Reynolds film, is a visual delight.

As a film, it's fun, but decidedly lightweight.

It's also the only film that I can think of, that's narrated by an Oscar.

A gorgeous Blu-ray from Warner Archive, and technologically an interesting example of what Eastman Color actually looked like in the early days of single strip negative.

Image - 5

Audio - 5

4k Up-rez - 5

Pass / Fail - Pass


RAH
 
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Will Krupp

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Oh wow! All this time I thought Susan Slept Here was a late three-strip title due to its look and the fact that it was produced at RKO during the late Howard Hughes era. The studio favored it and they were, I think, the last studio to regularly use the old cameras through 1954. I had no idea it wasn't. I always enjoyed this title. Who has ever been cuter than Debbie Reynolds?

I have to ask, though, (not to have the temerity to doubt you but I was really really convinced this was a three strip title) are you sure it was shot on Eastman single strip?
 
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classicmovieguy

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This was THE very first Warner Archive disc I ever purchased, back in early 2011 and I remember being very impressed how well it looked upscaled. As a Debbie fan I will happily double-dip for this.

Hope that we see more of Debbie on Blu-ray from the Archive... "Unsinkable Molly Brown", "Athena", "Two Weeks with Love", "The Gazebo", and "The Tender Trap"...
 

Matt Hough

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I LOVE Two Weeks With Love, but the dark DVD indicates the film needs much work to make it to Blu-ray.
 

Astairefan

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Yay! Looking forward to seeing this movie on Blu-ray! Out of curiosity Mr. Harris, do you know whether WAC have any more titles like this one that they are working on for Blu-ray? And to clarify, I mean titles that they themselves released on DVD without prior release by WHV, since this one was a bit of a surprise (to me, anyways).
 

classicmovieguy

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Yay! Looking forward to seeing this movie on Blu-ray! Out of curiosity Mr. Harris, do you know whether WAC have any more titles like this one that they are working on for Blu-ray? And to clarify, I mean titles that they themselves released on DVD without prior release by WHV, since this one was a bit of a surprise (to me, anyways).
It was a surprise to me as well - I never entertained the idea that titles released on DVD through the Archive could get Blu-ray upgrades...
 

Astairefan

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It was a surprise to me as well - I never entertained the idea that titles released on DVD through the Archive could get Blu-ray upgrades...
I wondered whether it was possible, but I thought it unlikely (especially since films released on MOD DVDs aren't exactly coming on Blu-ray very fast from anybody, with the exception of all the MGM films being licensed out). I can't help but wonder if this film is an experiment for WAC to see if they can do this with any more films.
 

notmicro

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Its funny how much staggering misinformation/misunderstanding there is around concerning Technicolor cinematography (which I personally worship the legacy of). The last movie filmed in Technicolor was Foxfire in mid-1954 (released 1955). I am CONSTANTLY running into things like on Wikipedia (surprise!) describing, say, a 1959 movie as "filmed in VistaVision and Technicolor", jeez; there's tons and tons of nonsense like that around.

What is true is that, from the mid 1950s to 1960s, hundreds of movies filmed using Eastman Color were turned over to Technicolor labs, where they were optically converted to 3-strip versions and printed in the Technicolor process (although I've never known if Technicolor started with negatives or edited inter-positives).

Note that the advent of Eastman/demise of Technicolor made possible the 1950s explosion of --
-- the brief 3D craze
-- CinemaScope
-- VistaVision
-- Cinerama
-- 70mm
none of which would have been practical/possible with the old 3-strip camera method.
 

Robin9

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Its funny how much staggering misinformation/misunderstanding there is around concerning Technicolor cinematography (which I personally worship the legacy of). The last movie filmed in Technicolor was Foxfire in mid-1954 (released 1955). I am CONSTANTLY running into things like on Wikipedia (surprise!) describing, say, a 1959 movie as "filmed in VistaVision and Technicolor", jeez; there's tons and tons of nonsense like that around.

What is true is that, from the mid 1950s to 1960s, hundreds of movies filmed using Eastman Color were turned over to Technicolor labs, where they were optically converted to 3-strip versions and printed in the Technicolor process (although I've never known if Technicolor started with negatives or edited inter-positives).

Note that the advent of Eastman/demise of Technicolor made possible the 1950s explosion of --
-- the brief 3D craze
-- CinemaScope
-- VistaVision
-- Cinerama
-- 70mm
none of which would have been practical/possible with the old 3-strip camera method.
Most of us go by what the film's credit titles say. If the credit titles say "Technicolor" and do not mention Eastman Color, we assume the film was shot using Technicolor. That assumption may sometimes be wrong but it's not nonsensical.
 

Will Krupp

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Its funny how much staggering misinformation/misunderstanding there is around concerning Technicolor cinematography (which I personally worship the legacy of). The last movie filmed in Technicolor was Foxfire in mid-1954 (released 1955). I am CONSTANTLY running into things like on Wikipedia (surprise!) describing, say, a 1959 movie as "filmed in VistaVision and Technicolor", jeez; there's tons and tons of nonsense like that around.

What is true is that, from the mid 1950s to 1960s, hundreds of movies filmed using Eastman Color were turned over to Technicolor labs, where they were optically converted to 3-strip versions and printed in the Technicolor process (although I've never known if Technicolor started with negatives or edited inter-positives).

Note that the advent of Eastman/demise of Technicolor made possible the 1950s explosion of --
-- the brief 3D craze
-- CinemaScope
-- VistaVision
-- Cinerama
-- 70mm
none of which would have been practical/possible with the old 3-strip camera method.
I'm not sure if this is in response to the question I asked about whether or not this was a three-strip production but, considering I'm the only one who brought it up, I have to assume it is. I can assure you I'm not a novice as far as Technicolor history/comprehension is concerned and I'm not attempting to spread misinformation or misunderstanding. I asked the question due to a few different factors. SUSAN SLEPT HERE was produced PRIOR to FOXFIRE. RKO routinely used Technicolor cameras for standard widescreen features up until they were discontinued and SUSAN did not use any patented process (not even SUPERSCOPE) that would require Eastman stock. Since asking the question initially I've also discovered that Richard Haines lists it outright as a late 3-strip production in his book about the history of dye-transfer printing, TECHNICOLOR MOVIES. Given those factors, all of which point to a general idea that Susan was not shot with early Eastman stock, it came as something of a surprise to read that it was. The question was simply a request for clarification.
 
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Robert Harris

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"He is not perfect."

Therefore, I'm fact-checking.

Color is referenced on print as Color by Technicolor," which generally denotes dye transfer print derived from a mono-pack source.

To clear up another point, dye transfer prints, derived from color negative, were struck from printing matrices, exposed from a negative.

Production ended in 1974 in LA, with Godfather 2, and a selection of reprints. In London in 1977, with, as I recall, Star Wars.
 

Will Krupp

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Thank you for checking Mr. Harris, I appreciate your time.

Color is referenced on print as Color by Technicolor," which generally denotes dye transfer print derived from a mono-pack source.
See, I always thought that was "PRINT by Technicolor." LOL

Any way you look at it, whether we're talking about color, sound, or aspect ratios, 1954 is THE most confusing year EVER!

Thanks again!
 

Bob Furmanek

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Note that the advent of Eastman/demise of Technicolor made possible the 1950s explosion of --
-- the brief 3D craze
In early 1953, Technicolor built a dual-strip camera rig for 3-D productions. MONEY FROM HOME and FLIGHT TO TANGIER were both photographed in Dynoptic 3-D with six rolls (YCM left/right) running through for each take.

Money-collage.gif
 

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