A few questions to get me started

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Scott Basham, Oct 31, 2001.

  1. Scott Basham

    Scott Basham Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi guys (and gals), this is my first time posting so I'll try to keep it as brief as possible (in a relative type of way)
    I'm looking to have both a home theater system and standard day time TV room all wrapped into one.
    Here's my HT bio :
    I've just purchased a Yamaha RX-V1000 which handles DTS + ES, Digital 6.1 and so forth. Along with it, I bought a Yamaha 6280 DVD changer (component out, but non-progressive scan) to feed the receiver and TV. For sound, I have Klipsch RF-3 II front speakers with a Bose 6.2 center, Klipsch Quintet satellites for the rear and a mid-grade subwoofer handling the bass.
    I guess that my next item to upgrade is my 9 year old Hitachi 27" TV that doesn't even have SuperVHS.
    Due to a short, but wide room, the minimum viewing distance is only about 8ft from the screen of my current TV. Also, I have a really nice (my standards) oak entertainment center that holds everything now. The entertainment system has a 27"H x 31.5"W opening for a TV.
    I'm strictly a movie guy, but there are 2 others in my family (1 big, 1 little) that will use whatever TV we get for mostly cable broadcast (they are happy with the TV we have now as long a QVC and Spongebob come in).
    Questions begin here:
    How am I doing so far? Any wrong purchases?
    What would you recommend I do about a television? 4:3 or 16:9? Buy one that fits in the cabinet or chuck it all and start over? I'm looking for a bigger screen with the best quality that I can afford. Nothing over 2k and preferably a LOT less.
    Would something on the order of the Toshiba 40" work well at that close of a distance, even when just viewing standard broadcast? Also, what's the side angle that these can be viewed at and still be considered acceptable? How dim must the room be? There are none locally to view in person. Is there a greater chance of getting a damaged TV from the shaking and pounding this things go through on the truck?
    Sorry for all the Q's. I just feel like I've got a good start, but need to finish it out with an improved TV. I will notice a huge difference right?
    thanks so much guys!
     
  2. Petros G

    Petros G Auditioning

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    Hey Scott Welcome to the HTF, i was kind of in the same predictament as u, i was in a great debate with myself about getting a large screen 16*9 or a 4*3 but I backed off the 16*9 do to the lack of programming in canada,i also backed off on a large screen for now, I ended up buying a 32" Toshiba for now and hope to upgade it 2-3 years from now. Hoping HDTV prices will drop by then.
    I belive your question regarding the 40" tv would work fine, Tuff decision getting rid of the wall unit though u might think of doing the same thing i did and get a new 27" tv for now and pick up something nicer down the road, just my thoughts, sorry if i made your decision tuffer pete.
    P.S. sorry for any spelling errors, spell check doesn't seem to be connecting at time of writing
     
  3. Max Knight

    Max Knight Supporting Actor

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    I would say ditch the cabinet and buy based on features and price/performance. You'll always second guess if you buy based on anything else.
    Don't be shy of projection TVs, they have much larger angles of visibility now, and you don't need to totally dim the room to see them.
    Depending on your budget, you might want to get an inexpensive tv for cable/sat viewing and a drop down screen for a front projection for movie time. The best of both worlds!
    What sort of budget do you have, and what does your room look like?
    -Max
     
  4. Scott Basham

    Scott Basham Stunt Coordinator

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    Max,
    My room would be a very nice size for what I want to do if, no make a a BIG IF I could talk the finance contorl officer [​IMG] that it would be okay do so some removing of partial walls built to give the idea of more quaint room.
    The room measures 13'x 15'. bit removing a partial or faux wall that comed out about 5' from the long wall. Where it ends, it has a about 1 1/2 foot of boarder crossing the cieling so that it give it the evect of being a somewhat separate rooms. I'm probably not doing a very good job of describing this, but you my have saw a similar design where the dining room is bewteen the kitchen and the tv or living room. I have no idea if this will turn up correctly, but try it out and see. If gives you a brief idea of what I'm dealing with. CLICK ON EDIT FUNCTION IN THIS POST AND YOU'LL SEE THE DIAGRAM THAT I'M TRYING TO GIVE.
    Kitchen Door
    |
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    ^ V
    | IIIII==IIIIIIII
    | I |cpu| I
    10' I I
    |
     
  5. Max Knight

    Max Knight Supporting Actor

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    Hi Scott,
    I think you are right to keep your direct view TV costs under $1200. Any more and you might as well buy a projection.
    As for how projection TVs look, they will have a distinctly different look than direct view. Less "shiny" and more film like, in my book. A progressive scan image on a direct TV is very film like.
    I couldn't quite tell from the diagram, but it looks like your preferred setup would put the TV off angle to you because the kitchen doorway is in the middle of the wall. I think that it is pretty important to have a straight view of the TV (not to mention speaker setup gets difficult if you have the whole seating area off to one side). I would actually put the TV along the long wall and your seating are along the other long wall across from it. Here is where a projection TV might be a big advantage, as they are much thinner than comparable direct views. My home theater uses a Toshiba 40H80, which is only about 18" thick. I have the couch about 7' away from it, and the surround speakers on tall stands a bit behind the couch. The whole space is about 10 or 11 feet deep, which would fit fine in your room.
    In other words, I would put your TV where your {ME} location is in your second diagram, and the seating across the room from that. This would leave a nice front soundstage area for your speakers, and your surrounds could go on the wall behind you.
    Hope this helps!
    -Max
     

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